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In the following code snippet, an interrupt routine uses one of many arrays for its execution. The array used is selected synchronously, not asynchronously (it will never change while the ISR is executing). On a single core microcontroller (this question assumes an STM32L496 if the architecture is important), is the volatile specifier required in the declaration of foo?

int a[] = {1, 2, 3};
int b[] = {4, 5, 6};
int * foo; //int * volatile foo? int volatile * volatile foo?

main(){
    disable_interrupt();
    foo = a;
    enable_interrupt();
    ...
    disable_interrupt();
    foo = b;
    enable_interrupt();
}

void interrupt(){
    //Use foo
}

My assumption is that the volatile specifier is not required because any caching of the value of foo will be correct.

EDIT:

To clarify, the final answer is that volatile or some other synchronisation is required because otherwise writes to foo can be omitted or reordered. Caching is not the only concern.

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  • well, if it is OK to leave foo to just point to a for the whole execution of the program... – Antti Haapala Oct 1 '17 at 10:28
  • The volatile keyword is not for synchronization, it's more for inhibiting optimizations for variables marked as volatile. In this case I see no need for it. – Some programmer dude Oct 1 '17 at 10:29
  • volatile is a qualifier, not a specifier. – too honest for this site Oct 1 '17 at 17:42
  • This has been asked numerous times before. Please do some research on SO before asking a question. A SO search for "C volatile ISR" gives around 50 more or less identical questions. – Lundin Oct 2 '17 at 11:15
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volatile stops the compiler optimizing it, forcing the compiler

  • To always read the memory, not a cached value from a register
  • To not move things before, or after the volatile read/write

On a complex CPU (e.g. x86), it is possible for the CPU to re-order operations before, or after a volatile access.

It is typically for memory-mapped-io, where regions of memory, are actually devices, and can change (even on a single core CPU), without visible cause.

The mechanism for C++11 is to use std::atomic to change a value which may occur on different threads of execution.

With a single core, the code will safely modify the value, and store it. If you use volatile, then it will be written to the memory point, before the interrupts are enabled.

If you don't use volatile, then the code may still have the new value in a register before it is used in the interrupt.

int * volatile foo;

Describes that foo can change, but the values it points to, are stable.


int volatile * volatile foo

Describes foo can change, and the things it points to can also change. I think you want int * volatile foo;

Update

For those who doubt that volatile is a compiler barrier.

From the standard n4296

Accessing an object designated by a volatile glvalue (3.10), modifying an object, calling a library I/O function, or calling a function that does any of those operations are all side effects, which are changes in the state of the execution environment. Evaluation of an expression (or a sub-expression) in general includes both value computations (including determining the identity of an object for glvalue evaluation and fetching a value previously assigned to an object for prvalue evaluation) and initiation of side effects. When a call to a library I/O function returns or an access to a volatile object is evaluated the side effect is considered complete, even though some external actions implied by the call (such as the I/O itself) or by the volatile access may not have completed yet.

and

From cppreference cv object

volatile object - an object whose type is volatile-qualified, or a subobject of a volatile object, or a mutable subobject of a const-volatile object. Every access (read or write operation, member function call, etc.) made through a glvalue expression of volatile-qualified type is treated as a visible side-effect for the purposes of optimization (that is, within a single thread of execution, volatile accesses cannot be optimized out or reordered with another visible side effect that is sequenced-before or sequenced-after the volatile access. This makes volatile objects suitable for communication with a signal handler, but not with another thread of execution, see std::memory_order). Any attempt to refer to a volatile object through a non-volatile glvalue (e.g. through a reference or pointer to non-volatile type) results in undefined behavior.

These seem to concur, that there is a compiler barrier, but some of the side effects of interacting with the volatile object may not have completed. For the single core processor, it appears to be a suitable mechanism if C++11 atomics are not available.

From : C++ standard : n4296

We have :-

Every value computation and side effect associated with a full-expression is sequenced before every value computation and side effect associated with the next full-expression to be evaluated.

From this I understand, there is a happens-before relationship for any operation with a side-effect.

Access to volatile objects are evaluated strictly according to the rules of the abstract machine

From this I understand, that there are rules (which maybe opaque).

Accessing an object designated by a volatile glvalue (3.10), modifying an object, calling a library I/O function, or calling a function that does any of those operations are all side effects, which are changes in the state of the execution environment. Evaluation of an expression (or a sub-expression) in general includes both value computations (including determining the identity of an object for glvalue evaluation and fetching a value previously assigned to an object for prvalue evaluation) and initiation of side effects. When a call to a library I/O function returns or an access to a volatile object is evaluated the side effect is considered complete, even though some external actions implied by the call (such as the I/O itself) or by the volatile access may not have completed yet.

From this I understand that access to volatile (and a few other things), create a side effect, which stops the compiler from re-ordering statements near a volatile access.

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  • "To not move things before, or after the register." - That's fatally wrong. – too honest for this site Oct 1 '17 at 17:44
  • thanks fixed to what i meant – mksteve Oct 1 '17 at 17:46
  • That's what I already read. And it is wrong. Volatile accesses are not compiler barriers. – too honest for this site Oct 1 '17 at 17:47
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    @mksteve you just repeat most popular myths about the volatile keyword. plus for you for explaining lack of atomicity and coherency. For the rest do some experiments yourself: godbolt.org/g/emifkE – P__J__ Oct 1 '17 at 19:46
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    @mksteve As stated, you should read about the exact meaning of volatile. Expecially about the common missconception about its atomicity and barrier behaviour. And I'd appreciate a reference to the standard defining "things". – too honest for this site Oct 1 '17 at 22:51

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