112

I have been going over async/await and after going over several articles, I decided to test things myself. However, I can't seem to wrap my head around why this does not work:

async function main() {  
    var value = await Promise.resolve('Hey there');
    console.log('inside: ' + value);
    return value;
}

var text = main();  
console.log('outside: ' + text);

The console outputs the following (node v8.6.0) :

> outside: [object Promise]

> inside: Hey there

Why does the log message inside the function execute afterwards? I thought the reason async/await was created was in order to perform synchronous execution using asynchronous tasks.

Is there a way could I use the value returned inside the function without using a .then() after main()?

  • 4
    No, only time machines can make asynchronous code synchronous. await is nothing but sugar for promise then syntax. – Bergi Oct 1 '17 at 18:59
  • Why does main return a value? If it should, probably it's not entry point and needs to be called by another function (e.g. async IIFE). – Estus Flask Oct 1 '17 at 19:12
  • @estus it was just a quick function name while I was testing things in node, not necessarily representative of a program's main – Felipe Oct 1 '17 at 23:11
  • 2
    FYI, async/await is part of ES2017, not ES7 (ES2016) – Felix Kling Oct 2 '17 at 17:48
163

I can't seem to wrap my head around why this does not work.

Because main returns a promise; all async functions do.

At the top level, you must either:

  1. Use a top-level async function that never rejects (unless you want "unhandled rejection" errors), or

  2. Use then and catch, or

  3. (Coming soon!) Use top-level await, a proposal that has reached Stage 3 in the process that allows top-level use of await in a module.

#1 - Top-level async function that never rejects

(async () => {
    try {
        var text = await main();
        console.log(text);
    } catch (e) {
        // Deal with the fact the chain failed
    }
})();

Notice the catch; you must handle promise rejections / async exceptions, since nothing else is going to; you have no caller to pass them on to. If you prefer, you could do that on the result of calling it via the catch function (rather than try/catch syntax):

(async () => {
    var text = await main();
    console.log(text);
})().catch(e => {
    // Deal with the fact the chain failed
});

...which is a bit more concise (I like it for that reason).

Or, of course, don't handle errors and just allow the "unhandled rejection" error.

#2 - then and catch

main()
    .then(text => {
        console.log(text);
    })
    .catch(err => {
        // Deal with the fact the chain failed
    });

The catch handler will be called if errors occur in the chain or in your then handler. (Be sure your catch handler doesn't throw errors, as nothing is registered to handle them.)

Or both arguments to then:

main().then(
    text => {
        console.log(text);
    },
    err => {
        // Deal with the fact the chain failed
    }
);

Again notice we're registering a rejection handler. But in this form, be sure that neither of your then callbacks doesn't throw any errors, nothing is registered to handle them.

#3 top-level await in a module

You can't use await at the top level of a non-module script, but the top-level await proposal (Stage 3) allows you to use it at the top level of a module. It's similar to using a top-level async function wrapper (#1 above) in that you don't want your top-level code to reject (throw an error) because that will result in an unhandled rejection error. So unless you want to have that unhandled rejection when things go wrong, as with #1, you'd want to wrap your code in an error handler:

// In a module, once the top-level `await` proposal lands
try {
    var text = await main();
    console.log(text);
} catch (e) {
    // Deal with the fact the chain failed
}
  • Thinking of it as a promise explains now why the function returns immediately. I experimented with making a top-level anonymous async function and I get results that make sense now – Felipe Oct 1 '17 at 23:10
  • 1
    @Felipe: Yes, async/await are syntactic sugar around promises (the good kind of sugar :-) ). You're not just thinking of it as returning a promise; it actually does. (Details.) – T.J. Crowder Oct 2 '17 at 6:48
  • I don't think you should mix async and old Promise.catch(), it makes it harder to read the code. If you use async, you should also use regular try/catch. – Not loved Not their people Apr 30 at 5:17
  • 1
    @LukeMcGregor - I showed both above, with the all-async option first. For the top-level function, I can see it either way (mostly because of two levels of indentation on the async version). – T.J. Crowder Apr 30 at 7:01
  • 2
    @Felipe - I've updated the answer now that the top-level await proposal has reached Stage 3. :-) – T.J. Crowder Jun 18 at 8:27
2

The actual solution to this problem is to approach it differently.

Probably your goal is some sort of initialization which typically happens at the top level of an application.

The solution is to ensure that there is only ever one single JavaScript statement at the top level of your application. If you have only one statement at the top of your application, then you are free to use async/await at every other point everwhere (subject of course to normal syntax rules)

Put another way, wrap your entire top level in a function so that it is no longer the top level and that solves the question of how to run async/await at the top level of an application - you don't.

This is what the top level of your application should look like:

import {application} from './server'

application();
  • You are correct that my goal is initialization. Things such as database connections, data pulls etc. In some cases it was necessary to get a user's data before proceeding with the rest of the application. Essentially you are proposing that application() be async? – Felipe Aug 8 '18 at 15:41
  • No, I'm just saying that if there is only one JavaScript statement at the root of your application then your issue is gone - the top level statement as shown is not async. The problem is that it is not possible to use async at the top level - you can't get await to actually await at that level - therefore if there is only ever one statement at the top level then you have sidestepped that issue. Your initialization async code is now down in some imported code and therefore async will work just fine, and you can initialize everything at the start of your application. – Duke Dougal Aug 8 '18 at 22:40
  • CORRECTION - application IS an async function. – Duke Dougal Aug 8 '18 at 22:47
  • 3
    I'm not being clear sorry. The point is that ordinarily, at the top level, an async function does not await.... JavaScript goes straight on to the next statement so you cannot be certain that your init code has completed. If there is only one single statement at the top of your application that that just does not matter. – Duke Dougal Aug 8 '18 at 22:51
2

Top-Level await has moved to stage 3, so the answer to your question How can I use async/await at the top level? is to just add await the call to main() :

async function main() {  
    var value = await Promise.resolve('Hey there');
    console.log('inside: ' + value);
    return value;
}

var text = await main();  
console.log('outside: ' + text)

Or just:

const text = await Promise.resolve('Hey there');
console.log('outside: ' + text)

Do keep in mind that it's still only available in Webpack@v5.0.0-alpha.15.

1

To give some further info on top of current answers:

The contents of a node.js file are currently concatenated, in a string-like way, to form a function body.

For example if you have a file test.js:

// Amazing test file!
console.log('Test!');

Then node.js will secretly concatenate a function that looks like:

function(require, __dirname, ... a bunch more top-level properties) {
  // Amazing test file!
  console.log('test!');
}

The major thing to note, is that the resulting function is NOT an async function. So you cannot use the term await directly inside of it!

But say you need to work with promises in this file, then there are two possible methods:

  1. Don't use await directly inside the function
  2. Don't use await

Option 1 requires us to create a new scope (and THIS scope can be async, because we have control over it):

// Amazing test file!
// Create a new async function (a new scope) and immediately call it!
(async () => {
  await new Promise(...);
  console.log('Test!');
})();

Option 2 requires us to use the object-oriented promise API (the less pretty but equally functional paradigm of working with promises)

// Amazing test file!
// Create some sort of promise...
let myPromise = new Promise(...);

// Now use the object-oriented API
myPromise.then(() => console.log('Test!'));

I personally hope that, if it's workable, node.js will by default concatenate code into an async function. That would get rid of this headache.

-1

Since main() runs asynchronously it returns a promise. You have to get the result in then() method. And because then() returns promise too, you have to call process.exit() to end the program.

main()
   .then(
      (text) => { console.log('outside: ' + text) },
      (err)  => { console.log(err) }
   )
   .then(() => { process.exit() } )
  • 2
    Wrong. Once all promises have been accepted or rejected and no more code is running in the main thread, the process terminates by itself. – user6516765 May 29 '18 at 21:31
  • @Dev: normally you would like to pass different values to exit() to signal whether an error happened. – 9000 May 9 at 16:14
  • @9000 Yes, but that is not being done here, and since an exit code of 0 is the default there's no need to include it – user6516765 May 11 at 1:45
  • @9000 in fact, the error handler should probably be using process.exit(1) – user6516765 May 15 at 9:20

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