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1.I'm trying to chain some promises with using functions on a global promise object. The chain sequence doesn't work as I thought. The following code output 1 3 4 2. 2.I wonder what is the reason for this. My thought is in the variable declaration pass, p.then() function registered but not its following promises, not until the p.then() function returns, it start to push the second then function in callback queue.

To answer the question why I'm doing this, I was trying to use an builder pattern for a sequence of actions. For example, builder().setupTestEnv().connectToDatabase().setupAuthServer().setupAuthClient(). Each function in this chain is intended to do _globalPromiseObject.then() to chain up following actions.

I know an alternative solution for this is, end the builder chain with an execute() call, which run Q.all() to run all promises in sequence. But just curious about this behavior of promise chain.

const Q = require('q');

const p = Q();

p
.then(
    function(){
        console.log(1);
    }
)
.then(
    function(){
        console.log(2);
    }
);

function foo(){
    p.then(
        function () {
            console.log(3);
        }
    );
}

function bar(){
    p.then(
        function () {
            console.log(4);
        }
    );
}

foo();
bar();
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  • 1
    If you want one sequence, you should write one chain not three. – Bergi Oct 1 '17 at 20:42
  • 1
    If you want the sequence 1,2,3,4, why do you make everything dependent on p? You have to CHAIN them, append them to one another, not to the same promise! You chain them all to the p promise, so the order will be the order you attached them to the chain on p. Always chain a callback (using .then(...)) to the promise it is supposed to depend on (and wait for). This can be an actual chain, or you can split a chain and use variables for each step. This method also helps to create promise dependency trees rather than only (linear) chains -- you are not limited to linear sequences. – Mörre Oct 1 '17 at 20:57
1

Not sure if this 100% answers your question, but perhaps it is helpful to look at this in terms of meaningful statements in your example:

  1. p.then()
  2. foo()
  3. bar()
  4. finally, #1's then fires

Those three operations happen immediately after each other, synchronously. Let's remove the foo and bar wrappers, as if you wrote their contents in place of calling them:

  1. p.then(/* log 1 */)
  2. p.then(/* log 3 */) contents of foo
  3. p.then(/* log 4 */) contents of bar
  4. finally, #1's then fires
5
  • A then never fires its callback synchronously. Not sure whether I misunderstood what you meant? – Bergi Oct 1 '17 at 20:44
  • @Bergi yeah. in this case, there is nothing happening besides those callbacks. – Lokua Oct 1 '17 at 20:48
  • Not the callback, but the calls to then itself in your program are happening synchronously, in that order. – Lokua Oct 1 '17 at 21:26
  • Cool. This makes sense. Thanks! – Eugene Lurks Oct 1 '17 at 21:44
  • Coz I have a different understanding of the then promise chan. I thought something like Promise.then() is returned synchronously and it will then keep building its following then() chain. But it makes sense it is not doing this. coz the behavior of following then() chain is related with the return value of previous then() results. We have to resolve the first then() first to register the following then() function. – Eugene Lurks Oct 1 '17 at 21:51
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You can return foo() and bar() from the respective function, then pass foo and bar to .then() .then(foo).then(bar) or return foo() and bar() from .then(function(){ return foo() })

const p = Promise.resolve();

p
  .then(
    function() {
      console.log(1);
    }
  )
  .then(
    function() {
      console.log(2);
    }
  )
  .then(function() {
    return foo()
  })
  .then(function() {
    return bar()
  })

function foo() {
  return p.then(
    function() {
      console.log(3);
      return
    }
  );
}

function bar() {
  return p.then(
    function() {
      console.log(4);
      return
    }
  );
}

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