I am trying to invert a bmp file and am soooo close to getting the correct output but I have no idea where I went wrong.

[My Output][1]

As with inverting images, the original was white background with the black box and x in the middle. HOWEVER, there was no black line at the top right (my output has a white line near the top right). Any clarification will be appreciated.

Loop that does the inverting:

int index = 0;
while (index < dibHeader.width) {
    int index2 = 0;
    while (index2< dibHeader.length) {

        fread(&pixel.b, 1, 1, file);
        unsigned int blue = pixel.b;
        blue = ~blue;
        pixel.b = (char) blue;

        ... Same for green/red

        fseek(file, -3, SEEK_CUR);
        f(write(&pixel.b, 1, 1, file);

        ... Same for green/red

        index2++;
    }
    index++;
}

Struct for pixels:

struct Pixels {
    unsigned char b, g, r;
}

Declaration of pixel

struct Pixels pixel;
  • Can you include the code which declares pixel and also that which progresses &pixel please? – Reg Oct 1 '17 at 21:18
  • 3
    How are you handling the required padding to make each row a multiple of 4 bytes? – Retired Ninja Oct 1 '17 at 21:22
  • Don't read and seek every pixel. Read the whole thing in, process it and write back as a whole. That will be much more efficient. – rustyx Oct 1 '17 at 21:38
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The image you have posted has a width of 273 pixels. It appears your code is handling a 24-bit image. The width in 24-bit image has to be padded to make sure it is a multiple of 4.

int padding = dibHeader.width % 4; 

The bitmap is read from bottom to top, row by row, and then column by column. In this case it doesn't matter if you go from top to bottom, but you have to iterate through the rows first, and the columns, and apply the padding for each row.

//24-bit image:
int padding = dibHeader.width % 4;
index = 0;
while(index < dibHeader.height) //<== go through the height
{
    index2 = 0;
    while(index2 < dibHeader.width) 
    {
        fread...
        pixel.r = ~pixel.r;
        pixel.b = ~pixel.b;
        pixel.g = ~pixel.g;

        fseek(f, -3, SEEK_CUR);
        fwrite...
        fflush(f);
        index2++;
    }
    fseek(f, padding, SEEK_CUR); //<== skip padding
    index++;
}

There are at least two things that are suspicious here:

First, with pixel.b = (char) blue, you cast an unsigned integer to a char before assigning it then to an unsigned char. Simply write pixel.b = blue.

Second, whenever you swich between reading and writing, you have to call fseek (or fflush), even if you don't move the file position index; otherwise the behaviour is undefined. So you'll have to introduce a fseek after your writes:

index2++;
fseek(file, 0, SEEK_CUR);

Note that your program requires to open the file in binary mode, i.e. "rb+".

I think you need rewrite this:

unsigned int blue = pixel.b;
blue = ~blue;
pixel.b = (char) blue;

on this:

pixel.b ~= pixel.b;

and use buffer for data. Don't need reading and writing few bytes. Read all data in buffer, work with them, and after that write data out of file. Also I see you forgot insert fseek(file, -3, SEEK_CUR); after writing data in file. But any way, be more powerfull and perfect working with buffer.

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