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I just started learning R and in my first assignment, I face a problem where I need to compare a bunch of variables and while doing that I am supposed to get false when comparing two variables not only when they are not equal but also when their type is not same. For example :

7 == "7"

gives true which should be false. Currently, I am doing the same as follows:

var1 = 8 == "8"
var2 = typeof(8) == typeof("8")
var1 & var2

I guess there should be some much simpler approach for the same. It seems like it implicitly converting 7 to "7" as it does when we add numeric to a character vector. So is there a way to get the same result in 1 line?

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    R coerces elements so that they can be compared. In that case, 7 becomes "7" so that it can be compared to "7" on the right hand side. You could do identical("7", 7), for example. Read the help file, ?"==", and you'll see that all sorts of coercions go on under the hood depending on the situation. – lmo Oct 2 '17 at 16:00
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    Here is the point in the help file key to your question: If the two arguments are atomic vectors of different types, one is coerced to the type of the other, the (decreasing) order of precedence being character, complex, numeric, integer, logical and raw. – lmo Oct 2 '17 at 16:06
  • "<7>" is not equal to 7. – Hong Ooi Oct 2 '17 at 16:07
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    @lmo the identical() function works great . And thanks for a suggestion regarding ?"==". This actually shown me how to get help using "?" :) – Mandar Sadye Oct 2 '17 at 16:09
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From the ?Comparison help page:

If the two arguments are atomic vectors of different types, one is coerced to the type of the other, the (decreasing) order of precedence being character, complex, numeric, integer, logical and raw.

On the same help page, the authors warn for using == and != for tests in if-expressions. They recommend using identical() instead:

7 == "7"
# TRUE
identical(7, "7")
# FALSE
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    This does not mean that one shouldn't still be very carefull: identical(8L, 8) [1] FALSE. This can happen if you define a vector, say, x <- 1:8 and then try to compare identical(x[8], 8). Guess the result. – Rui Barradas Oct 2 '17 at 16:27
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    True. At the same time, identical(8, 8.0) [1] TRUE. Seems like R automatically assumes that numeric data are floats, unless explicitly specified otherwise – KenHBS Oct 2 '17 at 16:29

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