0

I'm trying to detect when an input has a double quote in it (") using ONLY CSS: When invalid, i.e. has character in it, it should then show message. Note: The input value is dynamically placed in my editing interface.

form div#intdblquote > input[type="text"]:valid {
  display: none;
  position: relative}

form div#intdblquote > input[type="text"]:valid ~ .requirements {
  display: none}
  
form div#intdblquote > input[type="text"]:invalid {
  display: block}
  
form div#intdblquote > input[type="text"]:invalid ~ .requirements {
  display: block} 
<form>
  <div id="intdblquote">
   <input type="text" id="intdblquote" name="intdblquote" pattern="[^'\x22]+" placeholder= " " value="MyEntry""  required />
   <div class="requirements">Must not contain double quote.</div>
  </div>
</form>

  • Duplicate of HTML5 input pattern search for quote - Change your pattern to pattern="[^'\x22]+" – Tyler Roper Oct 2 '17 at 21:01
  • I changed pattern to suggested, but it's still not changing, based on what is in value. – parti Oct 2 '17 at 21:11
  • @Santi It's still not working properly, I added a quote to the end of my value, so you can see the new pattern is still not returning invalid. – parti Oct 2 '17 at 21:26
  • 2
    You can't put double quotes inside an HTML attribute. It isn't valid. The value property ends at the second quote, and thinks that your extra " is just a mistake. It works fine. – Tyler Roper Oct 2 '17 at 21:40
  • @Santi Well, I understand about ending at second quote, but your example stripped out the value, which I need & the text will be dynamically put in there. – parti Oct 2 '17 at 21:48
1

Maybe I am not getting it right, but I guess everything is almost allright. You might have messed up styles and escaping. This seems to work: the warning is shown when " symbol is typed in. If you want your default value to be MyEntry" enclose the attribute in '.

form div#intdblquote > input[type="text"]:valid ~ .requirements {
  display: none;
}
  
form div#intdblquote > input[type="text"]:invalid ~ .requirements {
  display: block;
} 
<form>
  <div id="intdblquote">
   <input type="text" id="intdblquote" name="intdblquote" pattern="[^\x22]+" placeholder="" value='MyEntry"' required/>
   <div class="requirements">Required. Must not contain double quote.</div>
  </div>
</form>

The pattern attribute specifies a regular expression that the element's value is checked against. When the regexp is not satisfied, then :invalid pseudoclass takes over. Otherwise the :valid one comes into play.

Also notice that if nothing typed in :invalid pseudoclass comes into force since attribute required is present.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.