30

On Unix, I can either use \r (carriage return) or \b (backspace) to overwrite the current line (print over text already visible) in the shell.

Can I achieve the same effect in a Windows command line from a Python script?

I tried the curses module but it doesn't seem to be available on Windows.

1
  • My question about a Python Download Progress Indicator might be helpful.
    – cschol
    Jan 21, 2009 at 13:55

11 Answers 11

34

yes:

import sys
import time

def restart_line():
    sys.stdout.write('\r')
    sys.stdout.flush()

sys.stdout.write('some data')
sys.stdout.flush()
time.sleep(2) # wait 2 seconds...
restart_line()
sys.stdout.write('other different data')
sys.stdout.flush()
1
  • 12
    If second data is shorter than first, first data's characters are left on console
    – Hilal
    Aug 9, 2016 at 12:19
21

I know this is old, but i wanted to tell my version (it works on my PC in the cmd, but not in the idle) to override a line in Python 3:

>>> from time import sleep
>>> for i in range(400):
>>>     print("\r" + str(i), end="")
>>>     sleep(0.5)

EDIT: It works on Windows and on Ubuntu

2
  • Count Mac OS in
    – eggmatters
    Jul 31, 2020 at 17:48
  • Still no solution for IDLE?
    – PouJa
    Nov 12, 2020 at 19:29
14
import sys 
import time

for i in range(10):
    print '\r',         # print is Ok, and comma is needed.
    time.sleep(0.3)
    print i,
    sys.stdout.flush()  # flush is needed.

And if on the IPython-notebook, just like this:

import time
from IPython.display import clear_output

for i in range(10):
    time.sleep(0.25)
    print(i)
    clear_output(wait=True)

http://nbviewer.ipython.org/github/ipython/ipython/blob/master/examples/notebooks/Animations%20Using%20clear_output.ipynb

1
  • 1
    ipython notebook/jupyter is what i was looking for!
    – dmeu
    Aug 13, 2015 at 14:28
7

I just had this problem. You can still use \r, even in Windows Command Prompt, however, it only takes you back to the previous linebreak (\n).

If you do something like this:

cnt = 0
print str(cnt)
while True:
    cnt += 1
    print "\r" + str(cnt)

You'll get:

0
1
2
3
4
5
...

That's because \r only goes back to the last line. Since you already wrote a newline character with the last print statement, your cursor goes from the beginning of a new empty line to the beginning of the same new empty line.

To illustrate, after you print the first 0, your cursor would be here:

0
| # <-- Cursor

When you \r, you go to the beginning of the line. But you're already on the beginning of the line.

The fix is to avoid printing a \n character, so your cursor is on the same line and \r overwrites the text properly. You can do that with print 'text',. The comma prevents the printing of a newline character.

cnt = 0
print str(cnt),
while True:
    cnt += 1
    print "\r" + str(cnt),

Now it will properly rewrite lines.

Note that this is Python 2.7, hence the print statements.

1
  • The newline-avoidance exactly fixed my problem, thanks! Just as an addition, in Python 3 one can use print(msg, end=' ') to avoid newlines. May 14, 2020 at 7:15
6

Easy method:

import sys
from time import sleep
import os

#print("\033[y coordinate;[x coordinateH Hello")
os.system('cls')
sleep(0.2)
print("\033[1;1H[]")
sleep(0.2)
print("\033[1;1H  []")
sleep(0.2)
print("\033[1;1H    []")
sleep(0.2)
print("\033[1;1H      []")
sleep(0.2)
print("\033[1;1H        []")
sleep(0.2)
print("\033[1;1H      []")
sleep(0.2)
print("\033[1;1H    []")
sleep(0.2)
print("\033[1;1H  []")
sleep(0.2)
print("\033[1;1H[]")
sleep(0.2)
3
  • but it keeps the old content visible ... May 10 at 11:24
  • Yes. It just give you ability for character location control. You must use more space character for overwrite. May 12 at 14:17
  • There are very good libraries in python that show percentiles and better coloring and writing support. May 12 at 14:19
3

Simple way if you're just wanting to update the previous line:

import time
for i in range(20):
    print str(i) + '\r',
    time.sleep(1)
2

Easiest way is to use two \r - one at the beginning and one at the end

for i in range(10000):
    print('\r'+str(round(i*100/10000))+'%  Complete\r'),

It will go pretty quickly

1
  • :-/ The first \r will be processed 9999 times for naught. If you don't know where your cursor is, you can call print('\r') once before the loop. Sep 4, 2017 at 9:56
1

On Windows (python 3), it seems to work (not using stdout directly):

import sys

for i in reversed(range(0,20)):
  time.sleep(0.1)
  if(i == 19):
    print(str(i), end='', file=sys.stdout)
  else:
    print("\r{0:{width}".format(str(i), width = w, fill = ' ', align = 'right'), end='', file=sys.stdout)
  sys.stdout.flush()
  w = len(str(i))

The same line is updated everytime print function is called.

This algorithm can be improved, but it is posted to show what you can do. You can modify the method according to your needs.

1
  • This won't work as you are defining w after it is called.
    – Aidan H
    Jun 3, 2019 at 3:02
1

Thanks for all the useful answers in here guys. I needed this :)

I found nosklo's answer particularly useful, but I wanted something fully contained within a function by passing the desired output as a parameter. Also, I didn't really need the timer, since I wanted the printing to take place after a specific event).

This is what did the trick for me, I hope someone else finds it useful:

import sys

def replace_cmd_line(output):
    """Replace the last command line output with the given output."""
    sys.stdout.write(output)
    sys.stdout.flush()
    sys.stdout.write('\r')
    sys.stdout.flush()
1
  • You need just a single flush() at the end. I'm not sure sys.stdout.write(output + '\r') would be that much faster than two method calls (because of allocating memory for the string, copying, GC), so keeping them separate is probably OK. Jan 25, 2017 at 9:47
1

Yes, this question was asked 11 years ago but it's cool. I like to improvise. Add-on to nosklo's answer:

import sys
import time

def restart_line():
    sys.stdout.write("\r")
    sys.stdout.flush()

string_one = "some data that is very long..."
sys.stdout.write(string_one)
sys.stdout.flush()

time.sleep(2)
restart_line()

string_two = "shorter data"
if len(string_two) < len(string_one):
    string_two = string_two+(" "*int((len(string_one)-len(string_two))))
    # This will overwrite the characters that would be left on the console

sys.stdout.write(string_two)
sys.stdout.flush()
1

Tested on PyCharm 2020.3 and Python version 3.9, to overwrite written printout I use the following:

from time import sleep

for x in range(10):
    print(f'\r {x}', end='')
    sleep(0.6)

That's the code I mainly use for my programs. Using end='\r' will overwrite the whole text for me, ignoring sleep.

In real scenario, I set it up as follows:

    def progress_callback(progress):
        print(f'\rDownloading File: {progress.dlable.file_name}  Progress: ' + '{0:.2f}%'.format(progress.percent), end='')
        # `return True` if the download should be canceled
        return False

    print('\nDownload complete!)

The print after the overwrite function has to be in new line, or the same line before will be overwritten.

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