12

I've got a dictionary like

dic = {'s_good': 23, 's_bad': 39, 'good_s': 34}

I want to remove all the keys that begins with 's_'

So in this case first two will be removed.

Is there any efficient way to do so?

22

This should do it:

for k in dic.keys():
  if k.startswith('s_'):
    dic.pop(k)
  • darn. beat me to the answer - stachoverflow only lets me post one answer per 3 minutes – tekknolagi Jan 11 '11 at 2:39
  • 1
    +1 FWIW I prefer pop to del – inspectorG4dget Jan 11 '11 at 2:51
  • 3
    Not a good idea, in general, to mutate something you're iterating over -- and on Python 3, keys is a dictview not a list. – agf Apr 14 '12 at 1:15
  • 1
    Python2 returns a copy of the dictionary keys which we iterate over so we are not changing the container. Python3 returns a dictview, a lazy sequence, that sees changes in the underlying dictionary so this will not work unless 'dic.keys()' is changed to 'list(dic.keys())' – Spaceghost Apr 17 '12 at 13:16
  • 1
    I want revert my vote because in python 3 for key in parameters.keys(): RuntimeError: dictionary changed size during iteration – Sérgio May 18 '17 at 17:47
18
for k in dic.keys():
    if k.startswith('s_'):
        del dic[k]
  • +1 However, FWIW I prefer pop to del – inspectorG4dget Jan 11 '11 at 2:51
  • 12
    but 'del' is the preferred way and it's faster. That is, "a={'x': 1}; a.pop('x')" takes 0.286 µsec per loop while "a={'x': 1}; del a['x']" takes only 0.178 µsec per loop. – Andrew Dalke Jan 11 '11 at 3:47
  • 6
    Not only that, it is also semantically better. del tells that you wish to remove the entry while pop tells you wish to retreive it. So in this case I prefer del to pop. ;) – johndodo Feb 29 '12 at 9:54
7

With python 3 to avoid the error:

RuntimeError: dictionary changed size during iteration 

This should do it:

list_keys = list(dic.keys())
for k in list_keys:
  if k.startswith('s_'):
    dic.pop(k)
5

How about something like this:

dic = dict( [(x,y) for x,y in dic.items() if not x.startswith('s_')] )
  • 1
    That doesn't remove the keys from the dict. It creates a new dict without the keys, instead. – nosklo Jan 11 '11 at 2:42
  • 1
    It's interesting that you felt the need to down vote in addition to supplying your own answer. I guess pedantism is alive and well, eh? I wonder (not having tested it) if removing from the existing list is actually faster that creating a new one. That was actually his primary question. – Peter Rowell Jan 11 '11 at 5:13
  • 2
    I haven't down voted you, but (1) @nosklo is correct (2) the word is "pedantry" (3) you omitted to mention that the code should differ between 2.x and 3.x (iteritems vs items) (4) the square brackets are redundant in modern Python (5) whether it is faster or not will be influenced by how many keys start with 's_' – John Machin Jan 11 '11 at 5:37
  • @John Mahin: Actually, the word pedantism is correct, if a bit old fashioned, he said pedantically :-). It is a variant form of pedantry. Ref. dictionary.reference.com/browse/pedantism and other online sources. – Peter Rowell Jan 11 '11 at 16:27
3

You can use a dictionary comprehension in Python 3:

{k: v for k, v in dic.items() if not k.startswith("s_")}

This similar syntax in Python 2 does the same thing:

dict((k, v) for k, v in dic.items() if not k.startswith("s_"))

Note that both these create a new dictionary (which you can assign back to dic if you like) rather than mutating the existing dictionary.

  • That doesn't remove the keys from the dict. It creates a new dict without the keys, instead. – nosklo Jan 11 '11 at 2:42
  • I don't see how that's wrong, since the question didn't specify mutating the dictionary in place. – Greg Hewgill Jan 11 '11 at 2:45
  • 2
    The question specifically asks to remove the keys from the dict. – nosklo Jan 11 '11 at 2:48
  • 1
    In any case, the existence of alternative answers show the OP that there is more than one way to do what was requested. For a beginning Python programmer, is is absolutely worth knowing about the list and dict comprehension syntax. – Greg Hewgill Jan 11 '11 at 2:55
  • ok, I don't oppose that. I'm just mentioning that a new dict will be created. You forgot to mention that in your first revision. – nosklo Jan 11 '11 at 3:12

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