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This question pertains to formulating a query in PostgreSQL Suppose I have the following table:

record   entity   docid   sentencid   
1   A   123   1231   
1   A   123   1232
1   A   100   1001
1   C   100   1002
1   B   121   1212
1   B   123   1234
2   B   102   1021
2   D   111   1111
2   D   102   1022
2   E   101   1011   
3   C   111   1115
3   C   111   1113
3   C   111   1114

Is there a PostgresSQL query that I can use to select all rows for n (or less) random groups of entities for each record in this table? Lets say n is 2. So the query should select all rows for record 3 and all rows for any 2 random entity groups of record 1 and 2. The final result should be ordered by accession, entity, docid, sentenceid.

Here is an example result with n=2:

record   entity   docid   sentencid   
1   A   100   1001
1   A   123   1231   
1   A   123   1232
1   B   121   1212
1   B   123   1234
2   D   102   1022
2   D   111   1111
2   E   101   1011   
3   C   111   1113
3   C   111   1114
3   C   111   1115

assuming that the entities A and B were randomly selected from the set of entities (A,B,C) for record 1 and the entities D and E were randomly selected from the set of entities (B,D,E) for record 2. The n entities should be selected randomly for each record.

I have searched extensively for answers to this question but did not find any working query. Thank you for looking into this!

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  • Can you post the expected result for n = 2 – Pரதீப் Oct 3 '17 at 4:56
  • I provided an acceptable result for n=2. Please let me know if you have any other question. Thanks! – ltt Oct 3 '17 at 5:07
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You can use row_number with a random() order to randomly select n entities per record group. Then join this to your main table

select * from Table1 t1
join (
    select * from (
        select record, entity,
            row_number() over (partition by record order by random()) rn
        from Table1
        group by record, entity
    ) t where rn <= 2
) t2 on t1.record = t2.record and t1.entity = t2.entity

Demo

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  • 1
    Thanks for your response. However 1) I need more than 1 entity per record. In the example above, I showed 2 entities per record. I may need more than 2 as well, but the number will stay constant. 2) I don't want to explicitly exclude record 3 using 'where record<=2'. I gave an example table above for a more general question. Record 3 will not necessarily have only one entity type in each case. – ltt Oct 3 '17 at 5:25
  • 1
    Thanks a ton! It works :D and makes sense too. Your detailed explanation as well as the demo helped me understand the query and test it out quickly. I tried upvoting your response but my reputation isn't high enough to do that yet. – ltt Oct 3 '17 at 6:05

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