0

i have function and i want to create it as default

ALTER FUNCTION [dbo].[ModifiedBy]() 
RETURNS varchar(50) 
AS 
BEGIN 
    RETURN host_name() 
END 

I want to do something like this, but it doesnt work. is it possible?

create default default_modifiedBy AS dbo.ModifiedBy()

Eror is User-defined functions, partition functions, and column references are not allowed in expressions in this context.

  • Can you order the code that you have tried and add it in the post? Question is not clear – Suvethan Nantha Oct 3 '17 at 7:52
  • What is default_modifiedBy ? You want to create a column in table, type or what? – Amit Oct 3 '17 at 7:55
  • its same like "Create default "abc" AS getdate()" – efysis Oct 3 '17 at 7:58
  • >>>This is function returning name of user who modified something<<< This function returns host_name() that has nothing to do with user and with modifications. It returns what your application passed as host_name with its connection string, and it can be everything – sepupic Oct 3 '17 at 8:10
2

I have just tried doing this and it works fine for me:

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[ModifiedBy]()
RETURNS varchar(50) 
AS 
BEGIN 
    RETURN host_name() 
END 
GO


CREATE TABLE Test (
                     ID INT
                   , Hostname VARCHAR(50) DEFAULT ([dbo].[ModifiedBy]())
                 );
GO

Test

INSERT INTO dbo.Test ( ID )
VALUES  ( 1 )

SELECT * FROM  dbo.Test
0

From the MSDN page for create default:

Any constant, built-in function, or mathematical expression can be used, except those that contain alias data types. User-defined functions cannot be used

Like M.Ali writes, you can use a user-defined function if you create a column-bound default constraint with alter table ... add constraint or create table ... (col1 default dbo.MyFunc());.

  • From MSDN: Any constant, built-in function, or mathematical expression can be used, except those that contain alias data types. User-defined functions cannot be used – Andomar Oct 3 '17 at 8:10
  • 1
    Ah, the restriction only applies to create default, not to defaults you apply directly to a database table. – Andomar Oct 3 '17 at 8:24

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