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Near-duplicate / related:


Out of interest, I decided to compare the performance of (inexpertly) handwritten C vs. Python/numpy performing a simple matrix multiplication of two, large, square matrices filled with random numbers from 0 to 1.

I found that python/numpy outperformed my C code by over 10,000x This is clearly not right, so what is wrong with my C code that is causing it to perform so poorly? (even compiled with -O3 or -Ofast)

The python:

import time
import numpy as np

t0 = time.time()
m1 = np.random.rand(2000, 2000)
m2 = np.random.rand(2000, 2000)
t1 = time.time()
m3 = m1 @ m2
t2 = time.time()
print('creation time: ', t1 - t0, ' \n multiplication time: ', t2 - t1)

The C:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

int main(void) {

    clock_t t0=clock(), t1, t2;

    // create matrices and allocate memory  
    int m_size = 2000;
    int i, j, k;
    double running_sum;
    double *m1[m_size], *m2[m_size], *m3[m_size];
    double f_rand_max = (double)RAND_MAX;
    for(i = 0; i < m_size; i++) {
        m1[i] = (double *)malloc(sizeof(double)*m_size);
        m2[i] = (double *)malloc(sizeof(double)*m_size);
        m3[i] = (double *)malloc(sizeof(double)*m_size);
    }
    // populate with random numbers 0 - 1
    for (i=0; i < m_size; i++)
        for (j=0; j < m_size; j++) {
            m1[i][j] = (double)rand() / f_rand_max;
            m2[i][j] = (double)rand() / f_rand_max;
        }
    t1 = clock();

    // multiply together
    for (i=0; i < m_size; i++)
        for (j=0; j < m_size; j++) {
            running_sum = 0;
            for (k = 0; k < m_size; k++)
                running_sum += m1[i][k] * m2[k][j];
            m3[i][j] = running_sum;
        }

    t2 = clock();

    float t01 = ((float)(t1 - t0) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC );
    float t12 = ((float)(t2 - t1) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC );
    printf("creation time: %f", t01 );
    printf("\nmultiplication time: %f", t12 );
    return 0;
}

EDIT: Have corrected the python to do a proper dot product which closes the gap a little and the C to time with a resolution of microseconds and use the comparable double data type, rather than float, as originally posted.

Outputs:

$ gcc -O3 -march=native bench.c
$ ./a.out
creation time: 0.092651
multiplication time: 139.945068
$ python3 bench.py
creation time: 0.1473407745361328
multiplication time: 0.329038143157959

It has been pointed out that the naive algorithm implemented here in C could be improved in ways that lend themselves to make better use of compiler optimisations and the cache.

EDIT: Having modified the C code to transpose the second matrix in order to achieve a more efficient access pattern, the gap closes more

The modified multiplication code:

// transpose m2 in order to capitalise on cache efficiencies
// store transposed matrix in m3 for now
for (i=0; i < m_size; i++)
    for (j=0; j < m_size; j++)
        m3[j][i] = m2[i][j];
// swap the pointers
void *mtemp = *m3;
*m3 = *m2;
*m2 = mtemp;


// multiply together
for (i=0; i < m_size; i++)
    for (j=0; j < m_size; j++) {
        running_sum = 0;
        for (k = 0; k < m_size; k++)
            running_sum += m1[i][k] * m2[j][k];
        m3[i][j] = running_sum;
    }

The results:

$ gcc -O3 -march=native bench2.c
$ ./a.out
creation time: 0.107767
multiplication time: 10.843431
$ python3 bench.py
creation time: 0.1488208770751953
multiplication time: 0.3335080146789551

EDIT: compiling with -0fast, which I am reassured is a fair comparison, brings down the difference to just over an order of magnitude (in numpy's favour).

$ gcc -Ofast -march=native bench2.c
$ ./a.out
creation time: 0.098201
multiplication time: 4.766985
$ python3 bench.py
creation time:  0.13812589645385742
multiplication time:  0.3441300392150879

EDIT: It was suggested to change indexing from arr[i][j] to arr[i*m_size + j] this yielded a small performance increase:

for m_size = 10000

$ gcc -Ofast -march=native bench3.c # indexed by arr[ i * m_size + j ]
$ ./a.out
creation time: 1.280863
multiplication time: 626.327820
$ gcc -Ofast -march=native bench2.c # indexed by art[I][j]
$ ./a.out
creation time: 2.410230
multiplication time: 708.979980
$ python3 bench.py
creation time:  3.8284950256347656
multiplication time:  39.06089973449707

The up to date code bench3.c:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

int main(void) {

    clock_t t0, t1, t2;

    t0 = clock();
    // create matrices and allocate memory
    int m_size = 10000;
    int i, j, k, x, y;
    double running_sum;
    double *m1 = (double *)malloc(sizeof(double)*m_size*m_size),
                *m2 = (double *)malloc(sizeof(double)*m_size*m_size),
                *m3 = (double *)malloc(sizeof(double)*m_size*m_size);
    double f_rand_max = (double)RAND_MAX;

    // populate with random numbers 0 - 1
    for (i=0; i < m_size; i++) {
        x = i * m_size;
        for (j=0; j < m_size; j++)
            m1[x + j] = ((double)rand()) / f_rand_max;
          m2[x + j] = ((double)rand()) / f_rand_max;
            m3[x + j] = ((double)rand()) / f_rand_max;
    }
    t1 = clock();

    // transpose m2 in order to capitalise on cache efficiencies
    // store transposed matrix in m3 for now
    for (i=0; i < m_size; i++)
        for (j=0; j < m_size; j++)
            m3[j*m_size + i] = m2[i * m_size + j];
    // swap the pointers
    double *mtemp = m3;
    m3 = m2;
    m2 = mtemp;


    // multiply together
    for (i=0; i < m_size; i++) {
        x = i * m_size;
        for (j=0; j < m_size; j++) {
            running_sum = 0;
            y = j * m_size;
            for (k = 0; k < m_size; k++)
                running_sum += m1[x + k] * m2[y + k];
            m3[x + j] = running_sum;
        }
    }

    t2 = clock();

    float t01 = ((float)(t1 - t0) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC );
    float t12 = ((float)(t2 - t1) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC );
    printf("creation time: %f", t01 );
    printf("\nmultiplication time: %f", t12 );
    return 0;
}
  • 3
    In the numpy code, you have m3 = m1 * m2. That is element-wise multiplication. Use m3 = m1.dot(m2), or, if you are using Python 3, m3 = m1 @ m2. (I haven't looked closely at your C code, so I don't know if there are any issues there.) – Warren Weckesser Oct 3 '17 at 19:44
  • 1
    In addition to the above, it's kind of comparing apples to oranges. How have you compiled your C program? Have you enabled any optimizations? Why do you think numpy is operating with a float-equivalent, rather than double? – Eugene Sh. Oct 3 '17 at 19:45
  • 4
    By the way....How can you detect x10000 difference with this code and 1 second time resolution? – Eugene Sh. Oct 3 '17 at 19:53
  • 1
    Your C accesses m2[k][j] in the inner loop over k. Compilers aren't smart enough to optimize your naive matmul by transposing first. (And compilers probably aren't allowed to, because there's nowhere to keep the temporary array.) @EugeneSh.: IDK about the 10k, but with gcc7.1.1 -Ofast -march=native output on a Skylake i7-6700k takes 37 seconds, running at 0.10 instructions per cycle. According to perf stat -d, L1-dcache-loads throughput was 139 M loads/s. The python multiply time is ~0.012 seconds, with perf counters (for the whole process) showing 1977 M loads / sec, 2.28 IPC. – Peter Cordes Oct 3 '17 at 20:34
  • 1
    Average CPU clocks for both C and python were about 3.8GHz, so those load per second numbers are directly proportional to loads per clock. The C run time is totally dominated by waiting for cache misses, with vastly higher traffic to last-level cache. And it can't take good advantage of SIMD. Even if python was doing a matmul, it would win by a lot because a naive C matmul is garbage. That's why there are optimized libraries for it. – Peter Cordes Oct 3 '17 at 20:37
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CONCLUSION: So the original absurd factor of x10,000 difference was largely due to mistakenly comparing element-wise multiplication in Python/numpy to C code and not compiled with all of the available optimisations and written with a highly inefficient memory access pattern that likely didn't utilise the cache. A 'fair' comparison (ie. correct, but highly inefficient single-threaded algorithm, compiled with -Ofast) yields a performance factor difference of x350 A number of simple edits to improve the memory access pattern brought the comparison down to a factor of x16 (in numpy's favour) for large matrix (10000 x 10000) multiplication. Furthermore, numpy automatically utilises all four virtual cores on my machine whereas this C does not, so the performance difference could be a factor of x4 - x8 (depending on how well this program ran on hyperthreading). I consider a factor of x4 - x8 to be fairly sensible, given that I don't really know what I'm doing and just knocked a bit of code together whereas numpy is based on BLAS which I understand has been extensively optimised over the years by experts from all over the place so I consider the question answered/solved.

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