I need to generate a sequence like this:
[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17, 21, 25, 31, 37, 43, 49, 57, 65, 73, 81]

(17 numbers in this example)

The algorithm is:
[1, (previous + 2), (previous + 2), (previous + 2), (previous + 2), (previous + 4), (previous + 4), (previous + 4), (previous + 4) ...

So it's +2 for 4 first items, then +4 for next 4, then +6 for next 4. Increment is increased by 2 each four items.

I was able to do a quick and hacky version in Ruby:

def sequence
  incr = 0
  (0..16).each.inject([]) do |acc, counter|
    acc << (acc.last || 1) + incr
    incr += 2 if counter.modulo(4) == 0
    acc
  end
end

But I am having problems doing the same in Elixir - it turns out super-lame. Like this:

def sequence do
  { sequence, _ } =
    0..16
    |> Enum.reduce({[], 0}, fn(counter, {result, incr}) ->
      last = List.last(result)
      if last do
        result = result ++ [last + incr]
      else
        result = [1]
      end
      if rem(counter, 4) == 0 do
        incr = incr + 2
      end
      {result, incr}
    end)
  sequence
end

Obviously I should not be thinking imperatively here, but for this problem I can't :D I am also sure there is an approach where pipes are much more atomic.

How can this problem be solved in an Elixir way?

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'd start the accumulator with {[1], 0} to remove the special case you have in the body of the function. List.last and ++ are generally not recommended because they are inefficient (O(n)). The idiomatic way in Elixir is to build the list in reverse and reverse the list at the end. This means your List.last logic can now be handled by pattern matching the head of the list, which is cheap. You should also be getting a warning for assigning incr inside the if. The idiomatic way is to do something like incr = if ..., do: incr + 2, else: incr.

Here's how I'd write this:

(0..16)
|> Enum.reduce({[1], 0}, fn counter, {[h | _] = result, incr} ->
  incr = if rem(counter, 4) == 0, do: incr + 2, else: incr
  {[h + incr | result], incr}
end)
|> elem(0)
|> Enum.reverse
|> IO.inspect

Output:

[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17, 21, 25, 31, 37, 43, 49, 57, 65, 73, 81, 91]
  • Thanks heaps! Is there also an advantage of using :lists.reverse over Enum.reverse? – konnigun Oct 3 '17 at 21:41
  • 1
    Not really. :lists.reverse might be a teeny tiny bit faster since Enum.reverse will first do a type check and when it finds a list it'll delegate to :lists.reverse. The performance difference will be insignificant. I'll change it to Enum.reverse. – Dogbert Oct 3 '17 at 21:50

In this case you could also just use an equation:

f(n) = 1 + 2*(k+1)*(2k+j), where k = div(n/4), j = rem(n/4) 

which in elixir would be something like this:

Enum.map((0..16), fn n -> 
  k = div(n,4)
  1 + 2*(k+1)*(2*k + rem(n,4))
end)
# => [1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17, 21, 25, 31, 37, 43, 49, 57, 65, 73, 81]

This was an interesting problem :) https://stackoverflow.com/a/46601289/24105 looks like the best solution. If you can get a formula for something, that is always the fastest. However, in this case I wanted to see if there were other solutions. Here is my take:

defmodule S do
  #1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17, 21, 25, 31, 37, 43, 49, 57, 65, 73, 81
  #So it's +2 for 4 first items, then +4 for next 4, then +6 for next 4. Increment is increased by 2 each four items.
  def gen1(n) do
    0..(n-2)
    |> Enum.reduce([1], fn x, [prev | _] = acc ->
      incr = ((div(x, 4) + 1) * 2)
      [prev + incr | acc]
    end)
    |> Enum.reverse
  end

  def gen2(n) do
    (n - 1)
    |> incr_series
    |> Enum.reduce([1], fn incr, [prev | _] = acc ->
      [prev + incr | acc]
    end)
    |> Enum.reverse
  end

  defp incr_series(n) do
    1..(div(n, 4) + 1)
    |> Enum.flat_map(fn x -> List.duplicate(x*2, 4) end)
    |> Enum.take(n)
  end

  def generate(n, algorithm), do: apply(__MODULE__, algorithm, [n])
end

ExUnit.start

defmodule AccumSeqTest do
  use ExUnit.Case, async: true

  for fun <- [:gen1, :gen2] do

    describe to_string(fun) do
      test "first 4 should increment by 2" do
        assert S.generate(3, unquote(fun)) == [1, 3, 5]
        assert S.generate(5, unquote(fun)) == [1, 3, 5, 7, 9]
      end

      test "second 4 should increment by 4" do
        assert S.generate(6, unquote(fun)) == [1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13]
        assert S.generate(9, unquote(fun)) == [1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17, 21, 25]
      end

      test "third 4 should increment by 4" do
        assert S.generate(10, unquote(fun)) == [1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17, 21, 25, 31]
        assert S.generate(13, unquote(fun)) == [1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 17, 21, 25, 31, 37, 43, 49]
      end
    end

  end
end

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