53

Is it possible to count how many items a collection has using the new firebase database, firestore?

If so, how do I do that?

65

As with many questions, the answer is - It depends.

You should be very careful when handling large amounts of data on the front end. On top of making your front end feel sluggish, Firestore also charges you $0.60 cents per million reads you make.


Small collection (less than 100 documents)

Use with care - Frontend user experience may take a hit

Handling this on the front end should be fine as long as you are not doing too much logic with this returned array.

db.collection('...').get().then(snap => {
   size = snap.size // will return the collection size
});

Medium collection (100 to 1000 documents)

Use with care - Firestore read invocations may cost a lot

Handling this on the front end is not feasible as it has too much potential to slow down the users system. We should handle this logic server side and only return the size.

The drawback to this method is you are still invoking firestore reads (equal to the size of your collection), which in the long run may end up costing you more than expected.

Cloud Function:

...
db.collection('...').get().then(snap => {
    res.status(200).send({length: snap.size});
});

Front End:

yourHttpClient.post(yourCloudFunctionUrl).toPromise().then(snap => {
     size = snap.length // will return the collection size
})

Large collection (1000+ documents)

Most scalable solution

By listening to any document deletes or creates we can add to or remove from a count field that is sitting in the database.

See the firestore docs - Distributed Counters Or have a look at Data Aggregation by Jeff Delaney. His guides are truly fantastic for anyone using AngularFire but his lessons should carry over to other frameworks as well.

Cloud Function:

export const documentWriteListener = 
    functions.firestore.document('collection/{documentUid}')
    .onWrite(event => {

    if (!event.data.previous) {
        // New document Created : add one to count
        db.doc(docRef).get().then(snap => {
            db.doc(docRef).update({numberOfDocs: snap.numberOfDocs + 1});
            return;
        });

    } else if (event.data.previous && event.data.exists) {
        // Updating existing document : Do nothing
        return;

    } else if (!event.data.exists) {
        // Deleting document : subtract one from count
        db.doc(docRef).get().then(snap => {
           db.doc(docRef).update({numberOfDocs: snap.numberOfDocs - 1});
           return;
        });
    }

});

Now on the frontend you can just query this numberOfDocs field to get the size of the collection.

  • 10
    Great solution for large collections! I would just like to add that implementers should wrap the read and write in a firestore.runTransaction { ... } block. This fixes concurrency issues with accessing numberOfDocs. – efemoney Apr 21 '18 at 21:09
  • 2
    These methods are using a recount of the number of records. If you use a counter and increment the counter using a transaction, would that not achieve the same result without the added cost and need of a cloud function ? – user3836415 Jun 17 '18 at 23:39
  • The solution for large collections is not idempotent and does not work at any scale. Firestore document triggers are guaranteed to run at least once, but may run multiple times. When this happens, even maintaining the update inside a transaction can run more than one time, which will give you a false number. When I tried this, I ran into issues with fewer than a dozen document creations at a time. – Tym Pollack Dec 29 '18 at 19:30
  • Hi @TymPollack. I have noticed some inconsistent behaviour using cloud triggers. Any chance you could link me to and article or forum to explain the behaviour you have experienced? – Matthew Mullin 5 hours ago
15

Simplest way to do so is to read the size of a "querySnapshot".

db.collection("cities").get().then(function(querySnapshot) {      
    console.log(querySnapshot.size); 
});

You can also read the length of the docs array inside "querySnapshot".

querySnapshot.docs.length;

Or if a "querySnapshot" is empty by reading the empty value, which will return a boolean value.

querySnapshot.empty;
  • 32
    Be aware that each document "costs" one read. So if you count 100 items in a collection this way, you are being charged for 100 reads! – Georg Jan 13 '18 at 12:37
  • Correct, but there isn't any other way to sum up the number of documents in a collection. And if you already fetched the collection, reading the "docs" array won't require any more fetching, hence won't "cost" more readings. – Ompel Jan 14 '18 at 20:28
  • 4
    This reads all the documents in memory! Good luck with that for large datasets... – Dan Dascalescu Feb 23 '18 at 12:51
  • 15
    this is really unbelievable that Firebase Firestore don't have kind of db.collection.count(). Thinking dropping them only for this – Blue Bot May 10 '18 at 20:02
8

As far as I know there is no build-in solution for this and it is only possible in the node sdk right now. If you have a

db.collection('someCollection')

you can use

.select([fields])

to define which field you want to select. If you do an empty select() you will just get an array of document references.

example:

db.collection('someCollection').select().get().then( (snapshot) => console.log(snapshot.docs.length) );

This solution is only a optimization for the worst case of downloading all documents and does not scale on large collections!

Also have a look at this:
How to get a count of number of documents in a collection with Cloud Firestore

4

Be careful counting number of documents for large collections. It is a little bit complex with firestore database if you want to have a precalculated counter for every collection.

Code like this doesn't work in this case:

export const customerCounterListener = 
    functions.firestore.document('customers/{customerId}')
    .onWrite((change, context) => {

    // on create
    if (!change.before.exists && change.after.exists) {
        return firestore
                 .collection('metadatas')
                 .doc('customers')
                 .get()
                 .then(docSnap =>
                     docSnap.ref.set({
                         count: docSnap.data().count + 1
                     }))
    // on delete
    } else if (change.before.exists && !change.after.exists) {
        return firestore
                 .collection('metadatas')
                 .doc('customers')
                 .get()
                 .then(docSnap =>
                     docSnap.ref.set({
                         count: docSnap.data().count - 1
                     }))
    }

    return null;
});

The reason is because every cloud firestore trigger has to be idempotent, as firestore documentation say: https://firebase.google.com/docs/functions/firestore-events#limitations_and_guarantees

Solution

So, in order to prevent multiple executions of your code, you need to manage with events and transactions. This is my particular way to handle large collection counters:

const executeOnce = (change, context, task) => {
    const eventRef = firestore.collection('events').doc(context.eventId);

    return firestore.runTransaction(t =>
        t
         .get(eventRef)
         .then(docSnap => (docSnap.exists ? null : task(t)))
         .then(() => t.set(eventRef, { processed: true }))
    );
};

const documentCounter = collectionName => (change, context) =>
    executeOnce(change, context, t => {
        // on create
        if (!change.before.exists && change.after.exists) {
            return t
                    .get(firestore.collection('metadatas')
                    .doc(collectionName))
                    .then(docSnap =>
                        t.set(docSnap.ref, {
                            count: ((docSnap.data() && docSnap.data().count) || 0) + 1
                        }));
        // on delete
        } else if (change.before.exists && !change.after.exists) {
            return t
                     .get(firestore.collection('metadatas')
                     .doc(collectionName))
                     .then(docSnap =>
                        t.set(docSnap.ref, {
                            count: docSnap.data().count - 1
                        }));
        }

        return null;
    });

Use cases here:

/**
 * Count documents in articles collection.
 */
exports.articlesCounter = functions.firestore
    .document('articles/{id}')
    .onWrite(documentCounter('articles'));

/**
 * Count documents in customers collection.
 */
exports.customersCounter = functions.firestore
    .document('customers/{id}')
    .onWrite(documentCounter('customers'));

As you can see, the key to prevent multiple execution is the property called eventId in the context object. If the function has been handled many times for the same event, the event id will be the same in all cases. Unfortunately, you must have "events" collection in your database.

  • 1
    They are phrasing this as if this behavior would be fixed in the 1.0 release. Amazon AWS functions suffer from the same problem. Something so simple as counting fields becomes complex, and expensive. – MarcG Oct 23 '18 at 15:28
  • Going to try this now since it seems like a better solution. Do you go back and purge your events collection ever? I was thinking of just adding a date field and purging older than a day or something just to keep the data set small (possibly 1mil+ events/day). Unless there's an easy way in FS to do that...only been using FS a few months. – Tym Pollack Dec 29 '18 at 20:11
  • Can we verify that context.eventId will always be the same on multiple invocations of the same trigger? In my testing it appears to be consistent, but I am unable to find any "official" documentation stating this. – Mike McLin Jan 4 at 14:13
  • So after using this a while, I've found that, while this solution does work with exactly one write, which is great, if too many triggers fire from multiple docs being written at once and trying to update the same count doc, you can get contention errors from firestore. Have you encountered those, and how did you get around it? (Error: 10 ABORTED: Too much contention on these documents. Please try again.) – Tym Pollack Jan 6 at 18:37
2

No, there is no built-in support for aggregation queries right now. However there are a few things you could do.

The first is documented here. You can use transactions or cloud functions to maintain aggregate information:

This example shows how to use a function to keep track of the number of ratings in a subcollection, as well as the average rating.

exports.aggregateRatings = firestore
  .document('restaurants/{restId}/ratings/{ratingId}')
  .onWrite(event => {
    // Get value of the newly added rating
    var ratingVal = event.data.get('rating');

    // Get a reference to the restaurant
    var restRef = db.collection('restaurants').document(event.params.restId);

    // Update aggregations in a transaction
    return db.transaction(transaction => {
      return transaction.get(restRef).then(restDoc => {
        // Compute new number of ratings
        var newNumRatings = restDoc.data('numRatings') + 1;

        // Compute new average rating
        var oldRatingTotal = restDoc.data('avgRating') * restDoc.data('numRatings');
        var newAvgRating = (oldRatingTotal + ratingVal) / newNumRatings;

        // Update restaurant info
        return transaction.update(restRef, {
          avgRating: newAvgRating,
          numRatings: newNumRatings
        });
      });
    });
});

The solution that jbb mentioned is also useful if you only want to count documents infrequently. Make sure to use the select() statement to avoid downloading all of each document (that's a lot of bandwidth when you only need a count). select() is only available in the server SDKs for now so that solution won't work in a mobile app.

  • This solution is not idempotent, so any triggers that fire more than once will throw off your number of ratings and average. – Tym Pollack Jan 10 at 13:28
1

I agree with @Matthew, it will cost a lot if you perform such query.

[ADVICE FOR DEVELOPERS BEFORE STARTING THEIR PROJECTS]

Since we have foreseen this situation at the beginning, we can actually make a collection namely counters with a document to store all the counters in a field with type number.

For example:

For each CRUD operation on the collection, update the counter document:

  1. When you create a new collection/subcollection: (+1 in the counter) [1 write operation]
  2. When you delete a collection/subcollection: (-1 in the counter) [1 write operation]
  3. When you update an existing collection/subcollection, do nothing on the counter document: (0)
  4. When you read an existing collection/subcollection, do nothing on the counter document: (0)

Next time, when you want to get the number of collection, you just need to query/point to the document field. [1 read operation]

In addition, you can store the collections name in an array, but this will be tricky, the condition of array in firebase is shown as below:

// we send this
['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e']
// Firebase stores this
{0: 'a', 1: 'b', 2: 'c', 3: 'd', 4: 'e'}

// since the keys are numeric and sequential,
// if we query the data, we get this
['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e']

// however, if we then delete a, b, and d,
// they are no longer mostly sequential, so
// we do not get back an array
{2: 'c', 4: 'e'}

So, if you are not going to delete the collection , you can actually use array to store list of collections name instead of querying all the collection every time.

Hope it helps!

  • For a small collection, maybe. But keep in mind the Firestore document size limit is ~1MB, which, if the document IDs in a collection are auto-generated (20 bytes), then you'll only be able to store ~52,425 of them before the doc holding the array is too big. I guess as a workaround to that you could make a new doc every 50,000 elements, but then maintaining those arrays would be entirely unmanageable. Further, as the doc size grows, it will take longer to read and update, which will eventually make any other operations on it time out being in contention. – Tym Pollack Jan 10 at 13:14
-1
firebaseFirestore.collection("...").addSnapshotListener(new EventListener<QuerySnapshot>() {
        @Override
        public void onEvent(QuerySnapshot documentSnapshots, FirebaseFirestoreException e) {

            int Counter = documentSnapshots.size();

        }
    });
  • 1
    This answer could use more context as to the code example. – ShellNinja Jun 1 '18 at 17:33
-4

You could use firebase cloud functions to keep track of count of documents in a collection. For more detail, have a look at: https://firebase.google.com/docs/functions

  • 2
    With 0 code and no real reference save for a link to an entire architecture doc, this answer is useless. – regretoverflow Nov 2 '18 at 3:07

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.