46

I'm trying to build a Windows Service in .Net Core 2.0 but I've been banging my head on the wall for a full day and no progress at all. Everything seems to be using Core 1.0/1.1 even the Microsoft documentation:

Host an ASP.NET Core app in a Windows Service

TopShelf doesn't support 2.0 as well, for what I've seen.

I've seen some weird solutions that put all the code in a .Net Standard Class Library and then use a .Net Framework application to host the Windows Service, but this doesn't look elegant in my eyes and I'm trying to get rid of.Net Framework altogether.

Is what I want to do even possible at the moment? Am I missing something really basic?

  • 2
    'trying to get rid of.Net Framework altogether' whilst trying to build a Windows service might be an uphill battle.. – thisextendsthat Oct 4 '17 at 9:56
  • 2
    @thisextendsthat - there's a good reason to want to do this, though. .NET Core 2.1 has dramatic IO-related performance improvements that are not in .NET Framework. – Joel Mueller Aug 8 '18 at 18:48
  • I'm also looking to use .NET core 2.1, but more for futureproof some windows services that I'm updating. But looking to get stuff out to live quickly on our existing infrastructure, so windows services seems more favourable than running in docker etc – andrew pate Jul 30 at 9:08
  • @andrewpate As I said bellow I currently have my services running with DasMuli's nugget on .Net Core 2.0, but it might work with 2.1 as well – DGaspar Aug 1 at 14:33

10 Answers 10

27

It is now possible to write a Windows Service in .NET Core 2.0 without third-party libraries, thanks to the release of the Windows Compatibility Pack (at the time of writing, still in prerelease). As the page itself warns:

But before you start porting, you should understand what you want to accomplish with the migration. Just porting to .NET Core because it's a new .NET implementation isn't a good enough reason (unless you're a True Fan).

In particular, writing a Windows Service in .NET Core may now be possible, but you will not get cross-platform compatibility out of the box, because the assemblies for platforms other than Windows will just throw a PlatformNotSupportedException if you attempt to use service code. Working around this is possible (using RuntimeInformation.IsOSPlatform, for example), but that's another question altogether.

Also, third-party libraries may still offer a nicer interface with regards to installing the service: as of writing, the current version of the compatibility pack (2.0.0-preview1-26216-02) does not support the System.Configuration.Install namespace, so the default approach with a ServiceProcessInstaller class and installutil will not work. More on that later.

With all that said, let's suppose you have created a brand new Windows service (Service1) from the project template (not strictly required since it contains nothing interesting, other than a class inheriting from ServiceBase). All you need to do to make it build on .NET Core 2.0 is to edit and replace the .csproj with the new format:

<Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk" ToolsVersion="15.0">
  <PropertyGroup>
    <OutputType>Exe</OutputType>
    <TargetFramework>netcoreapp20</TargetFramework>
    <RuntimeIdentifier>win-x64</RuntimeIdentifier>
  </PropertyGroup>
  <ItemGroup>
    <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.Windows.Compatibility" Version="2.0.0-*" />
  </ItemGroup>
</Project>

And then delete properties\AssemblyInfo.cs since it's no longer required and will conflict with version information in the project itself.

If you already have a service and it has dependencies, the conversion may be more complicated. See here.

Now you should be able to run dotnet publish and get an executable. As mentioned, you can't use the ServiceProcessInstaller class to install the service, so you'll have to manually

  • register the event source the service uses;
  • create the actual service.

This can be done with some PowerShell. From an elevated prompt in the location that contains your published executable:

$messageResourceFile = "C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\EventLogMessages.dll"
New-EventLog -LogName Application -Source Service1 -MessageResourceFile $messageResourceFile
sc.exe create Service1 binPath= (Resolve-Path .\WindowsService1.exe)

This is not ideal in several ways: this hard-codes the path of the message resource file (we should really be determining where it is from the executable and the runtime paths in the registry), and it hard-codes the service name and executable name. You may want to give your project its own installation capabilities by doing some command-line parsing in Program.cs, or use one of the libraries mentioned in Cocowalla's answer.

  • I currently have my service running with github.com/dasMulli/dotnet-win32-service but when I can I'll try and fiddle with this solution, since it looks like the best for future proofing, and ofc it looks like it'll be the native way of doing it. If all goes well I'll accept your answer. – DGaspar Feb 27 '18 at 18:03
  • With this approach, what type of config file is supported? App.config or Appsettings.json? – Justin Mar 13 at 14:11
  • @Justin: there is nothing specific in the service code that mandates either. You can use whatever a regular .NET Core console application would support (which depends on the packages you add and the code you use). – Jeroen Mostert Mar 13 at 14:17
14

To host .NET Core 2.0 Web API as Windows Service. I followed this guide Host ASP.NET Core in a Windows Service. The Prerequisites part is unclear to me. After some mistakes, here is what I did: Source Code

  1. Create an ASP.NET Core Web Application enter image description here
  2. Choose API enter image description here
  3. Edit .csproj file, need to change target framework from netcoreapp2.0 to net461, explicitly list all the package references rather than using Microsoft.AspNetCore.All, as following

<Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk.Web">

  <PropertyGroup>
    <TargetFramework>net461</TargetFramework>
    <RuntimeIdentifier>win7-x64</RuntimeIdentifier>
    <!--<TargetFramework>netcoreapp2.0</TargetFramework>-->
  </PropertyGroup>

  <ItemGroup>
    <Folder Include="wwwroot\" />
  </ItemGroup>

  <ItemGroup>
    <!--<PackageReference Include="Microsoft.AspNetCore.All" Version="2.0.6" />-->
    <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.AspNetCore" Version="2.0.2" />
    <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.AspNetCore.Hosting.WindowsServices" Version="2.0.2" />
    <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc" Version="2.0.3" />
    <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.AspNetCore.StaticFiles" Version="2.0.2" />
    <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.Debug" Version="2.0.1" />
    <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.VisualStudio.Web.BrowserLink" Version="2.0.2" />
  </ItemGroup>

  <ItemGroup>
    <DotNetCliToolReference Include="Microsoft.VisualStudio.Web.CodeGeneration.Tools" Version="2.0.3" />
  </ItemGroup>

</Project>

  1. power shell [solution-folder] dotnet publish -o "[publish-folder]"
  2. power shell [solution-folder] sc.exe create CoreApi binpath="[publish-folder]\CoreApiHostedAsWindowsService.exe"
  3. power shell [solution-folder] sc.exe start CoreApi
  4. visit default api power shell [solution-folder] Invoke-WebRequest http://localhost:5000/api/values
  • 1
    Worked like a charm, thanks! – John McCann Apr 9 '18 at 20:58
  • 4
    In my case I don't want it to host a WebSite, I just want it to run some background tasks like zipping some files and upload them via FTP and some other stuff, would you recon this would work as well? – DGaspar Apr 13 '18 at 9:07
  • This worked. Should be higher up. Thanks! – Alex G. Apr 21 '18 at 21:09
  • @DGaspar For your requirement, I would try creating a .Net Core Console App, and use nssm to host the Console App. – Chenger May 22 '18 at 19:52
  • .net core != .NET Framework – ironic Aug 20 at 12:01
12

I'll summarise some options:

  1. Move your code into a .NET Standard library, and host it in a .NET Framework app, so you can use ServiceBase. This will of course need the .NET Framework to be installed on the target machine
  2. Use NSSM (the Non-Sucking Service Manager) to manage a .NET Core console app (it has a public domain license)
  3. Use Windows API calls to hook into Windows service methods. This is the approach taken by DotNetCore.WindowsService and dotnet-win32-service (both are MIT licensed)

I think @JeroenMostert's comment is a bit harsh - I can see the appeal of not being dependant on a particular .NET Framework version being available on the target machines. Plenty others obviously feel the same, as the 2 repos I linked to are rather popular.

  • I deleted my comment. I also wrote up a new answer to point out that there's now an MS-based solution for services in .NET Core 2.0 (although using some third-party solution is still more convenient). I trust that soothes any harshness. :-) – Jeroen Mostert Feb 27 '18 at 14:32
8

In .NET Core 2.1 you are able to use the Host and HostBuilder to get a console applicaiton that runs as a service. If you containerize your console application you can deploy the container anywhere and it is just the same as running as a service. You are able to use the Host and HostBuilder to manage DI, Logging, Graceful shut down, etc in you console app. Have a look at:

Hosting services in .NET Core console application

4

An easy way to create a .NET Core Windows service is by using Peter Kottas' DotNetCore.WindowsService library.

The NuGet package is PeterKottas.DotNetCore.WindowsService. To install it using the Visual Studio Package Manager Console, just run

Install-Package PeterKottas.DotNetCore.WindowsService

There are good notes on how to get started, too.

  • As I mentioned previously, PeterKottas's nugget uses DasMuli's nugget code internally. I'm currently using DasMuli's one, but PeterKottas's should also work. – DGaspar Aug 14 '18 at 15:28
  • At first glance this seems to work perfectly. notice that you need to create a .NET Core CONSOLE application and add the package. You can then install that console application to run like a service. I've overlooked that few times before I got it running. So it's NOT for a .NET Windows Servce – CodingYourLife Mar 25 at 18:52
2

Maybe this is a complete cop-out, but remember that with greater docker support, you may be able to build out a service that runs within a container. At that point, it would still be .net core (2.0) but running on your windows box. What's more, you could deploy just about anywhere in the future.

As dotnet core matures, I this is a better and better solution, assuming your service doesn't require resources local to the host.

2

We just need System.ServiceProcess.ServiceController NuGet package to run a .NET Core application as Windows Service.

Following is the .csproj file,

<Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk">

<PropertyGroup>
  <OutputType>Exe</OutputType>
  <TargetFramework>netcoreapp2.1</TargetFramework>
  <RuntimeIdentifier>win7-x64</RuntimeIdentifier>
</PropertyGroup>

<ItemGroup>
<PackageReference Include="System.ServiceProcess.ServiceController" 
 Version="4.5.0" />
</ItemGroup>

</Project>

Program.cs file,

using System.ServiceProcess;
namespace WindowsService101
{
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        using (var service = new HelloWorldService())
        {
            ServiceBase.Run(service);
        }
    }
}
}



public class HelloWorldService : ServiceBase
{
    protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
    {
       // Code Here
    }

    protected override void OnStop()
    {
        // Code Here
    }
}

Build and Publish the solution.

  1. Open Cmd Prompt in Admin mode from the .exe folder Sample: \WindowsService101\bin\Debug\netcoreapp2.1\publish

  2. sc create binPath=""

  3. sc start

  • Works for me. Although I had to give the full path to the .exe in binPath, probably because I have code finding the pathtoContentRoot. – andrew pate Jul 31 at 12:58
2

ASP.NET Core in a Windows Service for .NET Core 2.2. Make the following changes to an existing ASP.NET Core project to run the app as a service:

Requires: PowerShell 6.2 or later

Framework-dependent Deployment (FDD):

Framework-dependent deployment (FDD) relies on the presence of a shared system-wide version of .NET Core on the target system. When the FDD scenario is used with an ASP.NET Core Windows Service app, the SDK produces an executable (*.exe), called a framework-dependent executable.

Add a Windows Runtime Identifier (RID) to the <PropertyGroup> that contains the target framework. In the following example, the RID is set to win7-x64. Add the <SelfContained> property set to false. These properties instruct the SDK to generate an executable (.exe) file for Windows.

A web.config file, which is normally produced when publishing an ASP.NET Core app, is unnecessary for a Windows Services app. To disable the creation of the web.config file, add the <IsTransformWebConfigDisabled> property set to true.

<PropertyGroup>
  <TargetFramework>netcoreapp2.2</TargetFramework>
  <RuntimeIdentifier>win7-x64</RuntimeIdentifier>
  <SelfContained>false</SelfContained>
  <IsTransformWebConfigDisabled>true</IsTransformWebConfigDisabled>
</PropertyGroup>

Self-contained Deployment (SCD):

Self-contained deployment (SCD) doesn't rely on the presence of shared components on the target system. The runtime and the app's dependencies are deployed with the app to the hosting system.

Confirm the presence of a Windows Runtime Identifier (RID) or add a RID to the <PropertyGroup> that contains the target framework. Disable the creation of a web.config file by adding the <IsTransformWebConfigDisabled> property set to true.

<PropertyGroup>
  <TargetFramework>netcoreapp2.2</TargetFramework>
  <RuntimeIdentifier>win7-x64</RuntimeIdentifier>
  <IsTransformWebConfigDisabled>true</IsTransformWebConfigDisabled>
</PropertyGroup>

Program.Main

public class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var isService = !(Debugger.IsAttached || args.Contains("--console"));

        if (isService)
        {
            var pathToExe = Process.GetCurrentProcess().MainModule.FileName;
            var pathToContentRoot = Path.GetDirectoryName(pathToExe);
            Directory.SetCurrentDirectory(pathToContentRoot);
        }

        var builder = CreateWebHostBuilder(
            args.Where(arg => arg != "--console").ToArray());

        var host = builder.Build();

        if (isService)
        {
            // To run the app without the CustomWebHostService change the
            // next line to host.RunAsService();
            host.RunAsCustomService();
        }
        else
        {
            host.Run();
        }
    }

    public static IWebHostBuilder CreateWebHostBuilder(string[] args) =>
        WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
            .ConfigureLogging((hostingContext, logging) =>
            {
                logging.AddEventLog();
            })
            .ConfigureAppConfiguration((context, config) =>
            {
                // Configure the app here.
            })
            .UseStartup<Startup>();
}

Publish a Framework-dependent Deployment (FDD):

dotnet publish --configuration Release --output c:\svc

Publish a Self-contained Deployment (SCD)

The RID must be specified in the <RuntimeIdenfifier> (or <RuntimeIdentifiers>) property of the project file. Supply the runtime to the -r|--runtime option of the dotnet publish command.

dotnet publish --configuration Release --runtime win7-x64 --output c:\svc

Grant write/read/execute access to the app's folder using the icacls command via an administrative PowerShell 6 command shell.

icacls "{PATH}" /grant "{USER ACCOUNT}:(OI)(CI){PERMISSION FLAGS}" /t
  • {PATH} – Path to the app's folder.
  • {USER ACCOUNT} – The user account (SID).
  • (OI) – The Object Inherit flag propagates permissions to subordinate files.
  • (CI) – The Container Inherit flag propagates permissions to subordinate folders.
  • {PERMISSION FLAGS} – Sets the app's access permissions.
    • Write (W)
    • Read (R)
    • Execute (X)
    • Full (F)
    • Modify (M)
  • /t – Apply recursively to existing subordinate folders and files.

Command:

icacls "c:\svc" /grant "ServiceUser:(OI)(CI)WRX" /t

Use the RegisterService.ps1 PowerShell script to register the service. From an administrative PowerShell 6 command shell, execute the script with the following command:

.\RegisterService.ps1 
    -Name MyService 
    -DisplayName "My Cool Service" 
    -Description "This is the Sample App service." 
    -Exe "c:\svc\SampleApp.exe" 
    -User Desktop-PC\ServiceUser

Start the service with the Start-Service -Name {NAME} PowerShell 6 command.

Start-Service -Name MyService

Handle starting and stopping events

internal class CustomWebHostService : WebHostService
{
    private ILogger _logger;

    public CustomWebHostService(IWebHost host) : base(host)
    {
        _logger = host.Services
            .GetRequiredService<ILogger<CustomWebHostService>>();
    }

    protected override void OnStarting(string[] args)
    {
        _logger.LogInformation("OnStarting method called.");
        base.OnStarting(args);
    }

    protected override void OnStarted()
    {
        _logger.LogInformation("OnStarted method called.");
        base.OnStarted();
    }

    protected override void OnStopping()
    {
        _logger.LogInformation("OnStopping method called.");
        base.OnStopping();
    }
}

Extension method:

public static class WebHostServiceExtensions
{
    public static void RunAsCustomService(this IWebHost host)
    {
        var webHostService = new CustomWebHostService(host);
        ServiceBase.Run(webHostService);
    }
}

Program.Main:

host.RunAsCustomService();

Set the content root path to the app's folder:

Program.Main:

var pathToExe = Process.GetCurrentProcess().MainModule.FileName;
var pathToContentRoot = Path.GetDirectoryName(pathToExe);
Directory.SetCurrentDirectory(pathToContentRoot);

CreateWebHostBuilder(args)
    .Build()
    .RunAsService();

Source:

https://github.com/aspnet/AspNetCore.Docs/tree/master/aspnetcore/host-and-deploy/windows-service/

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/host-and-deploy/windows-service?view=aspnetcore-2.2

  • Note: If you use a configuration file such as appsettings.json, you may need to do something like this to get it... _jsonConfigurationFile = Path.Combine(pathToContentRoot, jsonConfigurationFile) – andrew pate Jul 31 at 13:02
0

As Microsoft released Microsoft.Windows.Compatibility, I would use it, as it seem to be best for future use.

Simple example of self installing service is here https://github.com/janantos/service_core

  • 5
    That's what the top answer already explains. Link-only answers that don't actually explain how the problem is solved aren't very helpful – Panagiotis Kanavos Oct 11 '18 at 10:01
  • I believe that code example is more than pointing use that – Jan Antoš Oct 11 '18 at 10:10
  • 2
    It doesn't point out anything. It's only a few calls to sc.exe without any explanation. That github repo can disappear at any time which would make this answer unusable. As it is, someone has to already know about services and sc.exe just to understand what that repo contains – Panagiotis Kanavos Oct 11 '18 at 10:11
  • Besides, Jeroen's answer explains the important steps that are missing from this repo - configuring the event source. – Panagiotis Kanavos Oct 11 '18 at 10:12
  • A link to a solution is welcome, but please ensure your answer is useful without it: add context around the link so your fellow users will have some idea what it is and why it’s there, then quote the most relevant part of the page you're linking to in case the target page is unavailable. Answers that are little more than a link may be deleted. – Dima Kozhevin Oct 11 '18 at 10:26
0

For those finding this question but want to implement a windows service with .NET Core 3.x

https://csharp.christiannagel.com/2019/10/15/windowsservice/

A combination of the generic host plus the background service plus the commandline tool sc and you have a windows service.

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