10

I need help with the programming of a game.

You open a chest and with a given probability you find an item.

Item / Chance

A / 10%
B / 30%
C / 60%

Random random = new Random();
int x = random.Next(1, 101);

if (x < 11) // Numbers 1..10 ( A -> 10% )
{ 
     do_something1(); d
} 
else if (x < 41) // Numbers 11..40 ( B -> 30 % )
{ 
     do_something2();
}
else if (x < 101) // Numbers 41..100 ( C -> 60 % ) 
{ 
     do_something3();
}

Does this example really make sense, in terms of probability? Do you have another solution?

Thank you in advance!

7
  • 1
    Looks like a reasonable way to me!
    – EpicKip
    Oct 4, 2017 at 11:20
  • what happens when x == 101 in this case? Oct 4, 2017 at 11:21
  • The same solution got 33 upvotes here stackoverflow.com/questions/1522208/… so you should be good
    – Lennart
    Oct 4, 2017 at 11:22
  • 3
    @TimothyGroote not possible the second parameter is The exclusive upper bound of the random number returned msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2dx6wyd4(v=vs.110).aspx
    – fubo
    Oct 4, 2017 at 11:22
  • 1
    @fubo true, but you shouldn't forget to update every single "magic value" in this example when changing the boundaries of your distribution. if you do, that's where the bugs will sneak in. Oct 4, 2017 at 11:23

4 Answers 4

9

I realize this is a tad late, but here's an example of doing it without consts, laborious if/else and/or switch statements ;

public class WeightedChanceParam
{
    public Action Func { get; }
    public double Ratio { get; }

    public WeightedChanceParam(Action func, double ratio)
    {
        Func = func;
        Ratio = ratio;
    }
}

public class WeightedChanceExecutor
{
    public WeightedChanceParam[] Parameters { get; }
    private Random r;

    public double RatioSum
    {
        get { return Parameters.Sum(p => p.Ratio); }
    }

    public WeightedChanceExecutor(params WeightedChanceParam[] parameters)
    {
        Parameters = parameters;
        r = new Random();
    }

    public void Execute()
    {
        double numericValue = r.NextDouble() * RatioSum;

        foreach (var parameter in Parameters)
        {
            numericValue -= parameter.Ratio;

            if (!(numericValue <= 0))
                continue;

            parameter.Func();
            return;
        }

    }
}

usage example :

WeightedChanceExecutor weightedChanceExecutor = new WeightedChanceExecutor(
    new WeightedChanceParam(() =>
    {
        Console.Out.WriteLine("A");
    }, 25), //25% chance (since 25 + 25 + 50 = 100)
    new WeightedChanceParam(() =>
    {
        Console.Out.WriteLine("B");
    }, 50), //50% chance
    new WeightedChanceParam(() =>
    {
        Console.Out.WriteLine("C");
    }, 25) //25% chance
);

//25% chance of writing "A", 25% chance of writing "C", 50% chance of writing "B"        
weightedChanceExecutor.Execute(); 
3
  • in your case, decent values for the ratios would be 1, 3 and 6 (or 10, 30 and 60) Oct 5, 2017 at 11:38
  • I actually thought about callback methods aswell but I couldn't remember what they are called in C#/Unity xD But your solution has the clear advantage that you will never forget to implement a method for one of the chances.
    – Rafiwui
    Oct 5, 2017 at 12:33
  • 1
    you will also not (so easily) accidentally reconstruct the random number generator, forget to update your comparisons, or produce unnecessarily deep nested code, forget to implement a switch case (or implement one that is unneeded). If your Action in the WeightedChanceParam gets too big for comfort, just implement a method and pass it as a reference, and your "chance" related code will remain readable. Oct 6, 2017 at 7:54
6

I agree with @Timothy, I'd go for a more maintainable solution, where you're not relying on magic numbers to split your probabilities. Also, it's personal preference, but I'd also call it ratio rather than percent, otherwise "100" becomes another magic number, and you limit yourself to a minimum probability of 1%. This way you can split it 1:10:200 or however you please:

public static readonly int RATIO_CHANCE_A = 10;
public static readonly int RATIO_CHANCE_B = 30;
//                         ...
public static readonly int RATIO_CHANCE_N = 60;

public static readonly int RATIO_TOTAL = RATIO_CHANCE_A
                                       + RATIO_CHANCE_B
                                         // ...
                                       + RATIO_CHANCE_N;

Random random = new Random();
int x = random.Next(0, RATIO_TOTAL);

if ((x -= RATIO_CHANCE_A) < 0) // Test for A
{ 
     do_something1();
} 
else if ((x -= RATIO_CHANCE_B) < 0) // Test for B
{ 
     do_something2();
}
// ... etc
else // No need for final if statement
{ 
     do_somethingN();
}

EDIT: More generalised solution

3
  • You should change x < RATIO_CHANCE_B to x < RATIO_CHANCE_A + RATIO_CHANCE_B because with the current solution the chances are 10/20/70
    – Rafiwui
    Oct 4, 2017 at 12:40
  • I can see that getting a little messy if you have more than 3 possible paths, if that's the case I'd probably look to decrement x by the previous ratio amount in each else block instead of adding each subsequent one in the if() clause
    – pcdev
    Oct 4, 2017 at 13:05
  • 1
    I wouldn't even decrement it by the previous one but by the current one: /*else*/ if ((x -= RATIO_CHANCE_CURRENT) < 0) { do_sth(); }
    – Rafiwui
    Oct 4, 2017 at 13:21
2

So to conclude the solutions here is a solution for any number of chances without a lot of if-else statements but a switch-case instead:

int[] chances = { 1, 23, 14, 49, 61 };
int totalRatio = 0;

foreach(int c in chances)
    totalRatio += c;

Random random = new Random();
int x = random.Next(0, totalRatio);

int iteration = 0; // so you know what to do next
foreach(int c in chances)
{
    iteration++;
    if((x -= c) < 0)
        break;
}

switch(iteration)
{
case 1:
case 2:
//...
default:
}
3
  • 1
    replacing if/else with a switch statement is kind of like putting lipstick on a pig ;) Oct 5, 2017 at 8:51
  • In this case I would say it is ways easier to identify specific actions because you can easily replace the integers with en enum and IMO switch-case is easier to read than if-else ;)
    – Rafiwui
    Oct 5, 2017 at 8:55
  • I like this one, because I need an index as a result of selection. So I can basically use this one and remove the switch statement. May 9, 2022 at 13:28
0

When I combine all your answers, then this should work here as well, right?

double number;
Random x = new Random();
number = x.NextDouble();

double RATIO_CHANCE_A = 0.10;
double RATIO_CHANCE_B = 0.30;
double RATIO_CHANCE_C = 0.60;
double RATIO_TOTAL = RATIO_CHANCE_A + RATIO_CHANCE_B + RATIO_CHANCE_C;


if ( number < RATIO_CHANCE_A ) // A -> 10%
{
do_something1();
}
else if ( number < RATIO_CHANCE_B + RATIO_CHANCE_A ) // B -> 30%
{
do_something2();
}
else if ( number < RATIO_TOTAL ) // C -> 60%
{
do_something3();
}
2
  • Same problem here with RATIO_CHANCE_B. Make sure it is A + B else you only have a chance as high as the difference between A and B for B
    – Rafiwui
    Oct 4, 2017 at 12:43
  • 2
    Two minor issues with this over my answer, first is that you should technically use < instead of <= (number will never be equal to 1.0, for example), second is that when maintaining those ratios you need to make sure that they always add up to exactly 1. If not, either your probabilities will not be accurate, or if RATIO_TOTAL < 1.0 you may occasionally find that nothing happens at all due to the final if statement
    – pcdev
    Oct 4, 2017 at 13:20

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.