7

An IDbContext has a DatabaseFacade, which has a CurrentTransaction property. But the CurrentTransaction is an IDbContextTransaction. I want to pass an IDbTransaction to Dapper.

How do I get an IDbTransaction instead of an IDbContextTransaction?

11

Currently (up to latest at this time EF Core 2.0) there is no official way to do that.

But you can use the following custom extension method to get it from IDbContextTransaction:

using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Infrastructure;
using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Storage;
using System.Data.Common;

public static class EFExtensions
{
    public static DbTransaction GetDbTransaction(this IDbContextTransaction source)
    {
        return (source as IInfrastructure<DbTransaction>).Instance;
    }
}

like

var dbTransaction = context.Database.CurrentTransaction.GetDbTransaction();

Update: Actually EF Core provides extension method with the above signature out of the box. It's provided by the DbContextTransactionExtensions class. In order to use it, all you need is a reference to Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Relational.dll assembly and

using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Storage;
  • That's awesome, thanks. Now I can have an EF based repository which can switch to a Dapper query by passing it the connection and the current transaction. – Ian Warburton Oct 4 '17 at 16:37
  • Well, that's the theory. In practice, these things tend not to work. :) – Ian Warburton Oct 4 '17 at 17:28
  • What's the issue? – Ivan Stoev Oct 4 '17 at 17:29
  • When running a Dapper call within TransactionScope using a DbContext connection, it doesn't appear to rollback the transaction on an exception. It's as if it's ignoring the TransactionScope. Ultimately, I'm trying to start a DbContext transaction before some tests so that working db work is rolled back after a test. – Ian Warburton Oct 4 '17 at 17:36
  • I've tried creating a new connection for Dapper, but the db user login fails. Enlisting in ambient transactions isn't implemented on the current .net core release, so I may have to come back to this. – Ian Warburton Oct 4 '17 at 17:39

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.