I'm a beginner in XS and have spent some time looking for this answer on the web with no luck. The problem is that XS changes the name of the function and when it goes to compile, I will get an undefined reference error. For example consider the XS code below:

size_t 
matrixIndex (colIndex, rowIndex,nCols,nRows)
      size_t colIndex
      size_t rowIndex
      size_t nCols
      size_t nRows
    CODE:
    size_t register i;
    RETVAL = (rowIndex * nCols) + colIndex;
    OUTPUT:
        RETVAL

I then try to use this in the following function like this

int
matrixCopyColumnVector_dbl (colIndex,fromMatrix,nColsMatrix,nRowsMatrix,intoVector,nRowsVector)
      size_t colIndex
      SV * fromMatrix
      size_t nColsMatrix
      size_t nRowsMatrix
      SV * intoVector
      size_t nRowsVector
    CODE:
      size_t register x, n;
      if( nRowsVector != nRowsMatrix) { RETVAL = 0; return RETVAL; }
      n = 0;
      for(x=0; x<= nRowsMatrix; x++) {
         intoVector[n] = fromMatrix[matrixIndex /*USE OF FUNCTION HERE!!*/(colIndex,x,nColsMatrix,nRowsMatrix)];
         n++;
      }
      RETVAL = 1;
      return RETVAL;
    OUTPUT:
       RETVAL

I then run make and it goes through the compile process and I get an error at what appears to be the linking stage of undefined reference to 'matrixIndex'.

So I am wondering what is the standard XS way to call a function from within the same XS file?

  • 1
    If you want to call an XS function (as opposed to a C function earlier in the file), you'll need to call it as a Perl sub. Don't make it an XS function, make it a C function. – ikegami Oct 4 '17 at 16:10
up vote 5 down vote accepted

XS code creates Perl subs. So calling an XS function is the same as calling any other Perl sub.

Instead of dealing with that complexity and inefficiency, create a C function instead of a Perl sub. (You can independently expose that C function using XS if you want to.)

#define PERL_NO_GET_CONTEXT
#include "EXTERN.h"
#include "perl.h"
#include "XSUB.h"

static UV matrixIndex(UV colIndex, UV rowIndex, UV nCols, UV nRows) {
    return (rowIndex * nCols) + colIndex;
}

MODULE = Foo::Bar  PACKAGE = Foo::Bar

int
matrixCopyColumnVector_dbl(colIndex, fromMatrix, nColsMatrix, nRowsMatrix, intoVector, nRowsVector)
    UV colIndex
    SV * fromMatrix
    UV nColsMatrix
    UV nRowsMatrix
    SV * intoVector
    UV nRowsVector
PREINIT:
    UV register x, n;
CODE:
    if (nRowsVector == nRowsMatrix) {
        RETVAL = 0;
    } else {
        n = 0;
        for (x=0; x<=nRowsMatrix; x++) {
            intoVector[n] = fromMatrix[matrixIndex(colIndex, x, nColsMatrix, nRowsMatrix)];
            n++;
        }
        RETVAL = 1;
    }
OUTPUT:
    RETVAL

Your use of return is incorrect. If you want to return prematurely, use one of the XSRETURN* macros.

fromMatrix[...] and intoVector[...] are completely wrong. fromMatrix and intoVector are C arrays. (They aren't even Perl arrays, not that that's relevant.)

Perl integers are of size IV (or UV for unsigned), not necessarily size_t. Use those for best compatibility.

If you want portability, you can't assume C99, so you can't mix declarations and code. You need to put declarations in PREINIT (or use curlies in CODE to create a new scope for variable declarations).

  • I see. Just got to compile and link. And useful info too. Thanks! – user2074102 Oct 4 '17 at 16:31
  • fromMatrix[...] and intoVector[...] will compile and link, but won't work. You still need to fix that. And I've just made an update. – ikegami Oct 4 '17 at 16:32
  • Yeah I have been looking on the web for documentation on converting from Perl array->C array and back the other direction. Any good links on this process? Even redirect to another stackoverflow Q&A would help. – user2074102 Oct 4 '17 at 17:02
  • 1
    SvRV dereference a scalar containing a reference. SvTYPE can be used to check that the referenced var is actually an array. You can then cast the variable returned by SvRV from a SV* into an AV*. newAV() creates a array. av_* functions manipulate arrays. – ikegami Oct 4 '17 at 18:06

An XSUB is not a C function. The XS preprocessor does create a C function from your declarations, but it has the signature void (CV*). The XSUB then takes arguments from the Perl argument stack and translates them to C values using your typemaps. It is therefore not possible to call your XSUBs directly.

Instead, you would have to call the XSUB as if it were any other Perl function, i.e. push the arguments as SV*s onto the stack. See perldoc perlcall for details. Clearly this is tedious and inefficient.

A better solution is to declare all functions that you want to use from both Perl and XS as static C functions in your XS file, then write the XS glue code to expose it to Perl. Here:

static size_t matrixIndex(size_t colIndex, size_t rowIndex, size_t nCols, size_t nRows)
{
    size_t register i;  // unneeded
    return (rowIndex * nCols) + colIndex;
}

Note that if this function uses any part of the Perl API, then you should also use the pTHX and aTHX macros. The declaration changes to

static size_t matrixIndex(pTHX_ size_t colIndex, etc...) ...

and when calling it from C you'd write matrixIndex(aTHX_ colIndex, etc...).

  • 1
    Yes, I had figured this out. It's definitely better to declare the C functions I need ahead then use XS as the glue as you say. Much cleaner that way too. I'm just having trouble marshalling the arrays back and forth now. – user2074102 Oct 4 '17 at 17:05
  • 1
    @annoying_squid That is another question entirely – ask it! – amon Oct 4 '17 at 17:08

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