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edit: more to the address than I had given in the example. It has a subfolder?? https://some_external_website.com/bh/public

Is it correct to say that xxx is a subdomain of yyy.com written as xxx.yyy.com

email I sent to the BIG IT dept: names changed to protect the innocent
Additional Info:Please create an entry that will map the subdomain xxx.yyy.com to https://some_external_website.com/bh/public this is an externally hosted web application. Please call me if you have any questions.

--end of message--

About an hour later I get a call because they don't know what I want, I was told that xxx is not a subdomain. The correct definition subdomain it would have to be xxx.www.yyy.com.

  • 2
    They are wrong. Why, we can't know. – Konerak Jan 11 '11 at 14:48
  • Then again, your request should not include the https://, which is a protocol. They can't redirect a subdomain to a protocol: they'll link the subdomain to an IP, the webserver on that IP will redirect to another URI. – Konerak Jan 11 '11 at 14:50
  • So what do I need to do to get to the result I'm looking for? – Doug Chamberlain Jan 11 '11 at 15:23
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The first component of a "domain name" is always the hostname. We can view a domain name as consisting of a hostname followed by one or more domain components. Each domain component is a subdomain of the component to it's immediate right. In xxx.yyy.zzz, xxx is the hostname (typically of a single machine, unless some kind of load balancing is going on), and yyy is a sub-domain of the zzz top-level domain. Colloquially we usually refer to zzz as the top-level domian, yyy as "the domain", and all other names to the left (excluding leftmost which is the hostname) as sub-domains. I'll add the disclaimer that I am by no means a DNS expert but to the best of my knowledge this would be why they aren't understanding your question. The hostname is not a "domain" per-se, i.e. it defines a single machine rather than a group (domain) of machines.

  • thanks, as an aside, I had logically derived that I should describe the url using xxx.yyy. notation. Apparently this is the common way to describe urls... – Doug Chamberlain Jan 12 '11 at 15:07

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