40

I have a problem in my application: At some point, the SynchronizationContext.Current becomes null for the main thread. I'm unable to reproduce the same problem in an isolated project. My real project is complex; it mixes Windows Forms and WPF and calls WCF Web Services. As far as I know, those are all systems that may interact with the SynchronizationContext.

This is the code from my isolated project. My real app does something that resembles that. However, in my real app the SynchronizationContext.Current is null on the main thread when the continuation task is executed.

private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (SynchronizationContext.Current == null)
    {
        Debug.Fail("SynchronizationContext.Current is null");
    }

    Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        CallWCFWebServiceThatThrowsAnException();
    })
    .ContinueWith((t) =>
    {

        //update the UI
        UpdateGUI(t.Exception);

        if (SynchronizationContext.Current == null)
        {
            Debug.Fail("SynchronizationContext.Current is null");
        }

    }, CancellationToken.None, 
       TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted,
       TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());
}

What could cause the SynchronizationContext.Current of the main thread to become null?

Edit:

@Hans asked for the stack trace. Here it is:


   at MyApp.Framework.UI.Commands.AsyncCommand.HandleTaskError(Task task) in d:\sources\s2\Framework\Sources\UI\Commands\AsyncCommand.cs:line 157
   at System.Threading.Tasks.Task.c__DisplayClassb.b__a(Object obj)
   at System.Threading.Tasks.Task.InnerInvoke()
   at System.Threading.Tasks.Task.Execute()
   at System.Threading.Tasks.Task.ExecutionContextCallback(Object obj)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.runTryCode(Object userData)
   at System.Runtime.CompilerServices.RuntimeHelpers.ExecuteCodeWithGuaranteedCleanup(TryCode code, CleanupCode backoutCode, Object userData)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.RunInternal(ExecutionContext executionContext, ContextCallback callback, Object state)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.Run(ExecutionContext executionContext, ContextCallback callback, Object state, Boolean ignoreSyncCtx)
   at System.Threading.Tasks.Task.ExecuteWithThreadLocal(Task& currentTaskSlot)
   at System.Threading.Tasks.Task.ExecuteEntry(Boolean bPreventDoubleExecution)
   at System.Threading.Tasks.SynchronizationContextTaskScheduler.PostCallback(Object obj)
   at System.RuntimeMethodHandle._InvokeMethodFast(IRuntimeMethodInfo method, Object target, Object[] arguments, SignatureStruct& sig, MethodAttributes methodAttributes, RuntimeType typeOwner)
   at System.RuntimeMethodHandle.InvokeMethodFast(IRuntimeMethodInfo method, Object target, Object[] arguments, Signature sig, MethodAttributes methodAttributes, RuntimeType typeOwner)
   at System.Reflection.RuntimeMethodInfo.Invoke(Object obj, BindingFlags invokeAttr, Binder binder, Object[] parameters, CultureInfo culture, Boolean skipVisibilityChecks)
   at System.Delegate.DynamicInvokeImpl(Object[] args)
   at System.Windows.Forms.Control.InvokeMarshaledCallbackDo(ThreadMethodEntry tme)
   at System.Windows.Forms.Control.InvokeMarshaledCallbackHelper(Object obj)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.runTryCode(Object userData)
   at System.Runtime.CompilerServices.RuntimeHelpers.ExecuteCodeWithGuaranteedCleanup(TryCode code, CleanupCode backoutCode, Object userData)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.RunInternal(ExecutionContext executionContext, ContextCallback callback, Object state)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.Run(ExecutionContext executionContext, ContextCallback callback, Object state, Boolean ignoreSyncCtx)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.Run(ExecutionContext executionContext, ContextCallback callback, Object state)
   at System.Windows.Forms.Control.InvokeMarshaledCallback(ThreadMethodEntry tme)
   at System.Windows.Forms.Control.InvokeMarshaledCallbacks()
   at System.Windows.Forms.Control.WndProc(Message& m)
   at System.Windows.Forms.Control.ControlNativeWindow.OnMessage(Message& m)
   at System.Windows.Forms.Control.ControlNativeWindow.WndProc(Message& m)
   at System.Windows.Forms.NativeWindow.Callback(IntPtr hWnd, Int32 msg, IntPtr wparam, IntPtr lparam)
   at System.Windows.Forms.UnsafeNativeMethods.DispatchMessageW(MSG& msg)
   at System.Windows.Forms.Application.ComponentManager.System.Windows.Forms.UnsafeNativeMethods.IMsoComponentManager.FPushMessageLoop(IntPtr dwComponentID, Int32 reason, Int32 pvLoopData)
   at System.Windows.Forms.Application.ThreadContext.RunMessageLoopInner(Int32 reason, ApplicationContext context)
   at System.Windows.Forms.Application.ThreadContext.RunMessageLoop(Int32 reason, ApplicationContext context)
   at System.Windows.Forms.Application.Run(Form mainForm)
   at MyApp.Framework.SharedUI.ApplicationBase.InternalStart() in d:\sources\s2\Framework\Sources\UI\SharedUI\ApplicationBase.cs:line 190
   at MyApp.Framework.SharedUI.ApplicationBase.Start() in d:\sources\s2\Framework\Sources\UI\SharedUI\ApplicationBase.cs:line 118
   at MyApp.App1.WinUI.HDA.Main() in d:\sources\s2\App1\Sources\WinUI\HDA.cs:line 63

  • Set a breakpoint on UpdateGUI and post the stack trace. – Hans Passant Jan 11 '11 at 17:07
  • 2
    Looks entirely normal. I have no explanation why TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext() doesn't work. That's the one that provides the SC for the Control.InvokeMarshaledCallback() call. It already checks for a null. Assuming you are using .NET 4.0 – Hans Passant Jan 11 '11 at 20:43
  • 1
    "Dispatcher", are you mixing Winforms and WPF code? – Hans Passant Jan 11 '11 at 20:53
  • 1
    @Sly did you got an answer for this problem? I'm having the same issue here >.< – Michel Ayres Jul 23 '12 at 13:09
  • 1
    @MichelAyres: We never found the root cause and decided to work around the problem by copying the SynchronizationContext.Current to a _syncContext variable. Then, in the task callback we do if (SynchronizationContext.Current == null) { SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(_syncContext); }. Did you look at @Dan's answer? I never got to trying it, which is why I still have not accepted his answer yet. If you tests it with .Net 4.5 and if it works, let me know and I'll accept Dan's answer. – Sylvain Jul 23 '12 at 16:16
43

Sly, I have run into the exact same behavior when a mixture of WPF, WCF, and TPL is used. The Main thread's current SynchronizationContext will become null in a few situations.

var context = SynchronizationContext.Current;

// if context is null, an exception of
// The current SynchronizationContext may not be used as a TaskScheduler.
// will be thrown
TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext();

According to this post on the msdn forums, this is a confirmed bug in the TPL in 4.0. A coworker is running on 4.5 and does not see this behavior.

We solved this by creating a TaskScheduler in a static singleton with the main thread using FromCurrentSynchronizationContext and then always reference that task scheduler when creating continuations. For example

Task task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
  {
    // something
  }
).ContinueWith(t =>
  {
    // ui stuff
  }, TheSingleton.Current.UiTaskScheduler);

This avoids the issue in the TPL on .net 4.0.

Update If you have .net 4.5 installed on your development machine, you will not see this issue even if you are targeting the 4.0 framework. Your users who only have 4.0 installed will still be affected.

  • 1
    I experienced this bug--I've posted a short Winforms program that demonstrates an easy way to reproduce the issue. stackoverflow.com/questions/11621372/… – Matt Smith Jul 24 '12 at 15:47
  • 1
    targeting 4.5.2 here, still have this error message pop up. Not on all tasks though... – CularBytes Mar 20 '16 at 14:10
9

Not sure if this is the preferred method but here is how I use the SynchronizationContext:

In you constructor (main thread) save a copy of the current context, that way you are guaranteed(??) to have the right context later no matter what thread you are on.

_uiCtx = SynchronizationContext.Current;

And later in your Task use it to do interact with the main UI thread

_uiCtx.Post( ( o ) =>
{
 //UI Stuff goes here
}, null );
  • 3
    This would work for sure but that would be a workaround. I'd like to figure out how the main thread lost its SynchronizationContext. – Sylvain Jan 11 '11 at 20:18
7

I've created a class for this. It looks like this:

public class UIContext
{
    private static TaskScheduler m_Current;

    public static TaskScheduler Current
    {
        get { return m_Current; }
        private set { m_Current = value; }
    }

    public static void Initialize()
    {
        if (Current != null)
            return;

        if (SynchronizationContext.Current == null)
            SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(new SynchronizationContext());

        Current = TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext();
    }
}

On startup of my App I call UIContext.Initialize()

And when I need it in a task I just put UIContext.Current as TaskScheduler.

Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
{
    //Your code here
}, CancellationToken.None, TaskCreationOptions.None, UIContext.Current);
  • 1
    Worked great on a Unity (5.5) project that was having this exact problem. Thanks! – argyle Mar 8 '17 at 19:35

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