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I created a small example project to show two problems I'm experiencing in the configuration of Spring Boot validation and its integration with Hibernate. I already tried other replies I found about the topic but unfortunately they didn't work for me or that asked to disable Hibernate validation.

I want use a custom Validator implementing ConstraintValidator<ValidUser, User> and inject in it my UserRepository. At the same time I want to keep the default behaviour of Hibernate that checks for validation errors during update/persist.

I write here for completeness main sections of the app.

Custom configuration In this class I set a custom validator with a custom MessageSource, so Spring will read messages from the file resources/messages.properties

@Configuration
public class CustomConfiguration {

    @Bean
    public MessageSource messageSource() {
        ReloadableResourceBundleMessageSource messageSource = new ReloadableResourceBundleMessageSource();
        messageSource.setBasenames("classpath:/messages");
        messageSource.setUseCodeAsDefaultMessage(false);
        messageSource.setCacheSeconds((int) TimeUnit.HOURS.toSeconds(1));
        messageSource.setFallbackToSystemLocale(false);
        return messageSource;
    }

    @Bean
    public LocalValidatorFactoryBean validator() {
        LocalValidatorFactoryBean factoryBean = new LocalValidatorFactoryBean();
        factoryBean.setValidationMessageSource(messageSource());
        return factoryBean;
    }

    @Bean
    public MethodValidationPostProcessor methodValidationPostProcessor() {
        MethodValidationPostProcessor methodValidationPostProcessor = new MethodValidationPostProcessor();
        methodValidationPostProcessor.setValidator(validator());
        return methodValidationPostProcessor;
    }

}

The bean Nothing special here if not the custom validator @ValidUser

@ValidUser
@Entity
public class User extends AbstractPersistable<Long> {
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1119004705847418599L;

    @NotBlank
    @Column(nullable = false)
    private String name;

    /** CONTACT INFORMATION **/

    @Pattern(regexp = "^\\+{1}[1-9]\\d{1,14}$")
    private String landlinePhone;

    @Pattern(regexp = "^\\+{1}[1-9]\\d{1,14}$")
    private String mobilePhone;

    @NotBlank
    @Column(nullable = false, unique = true)
    private String username;

    @Email
    private String email;

    @JsonIgnore
    private String password;

    @Min(value = 0)
    private BigDecimal cashFund = BigDecimal.ZERO;

    public User() {

    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public String getLandlinePhone() {
        return landlinePhone;
    }

    public void setLandlinePhone(String landlinePhone) {
        this.landlinePhone = landlinePhone;
    }

    public String getMobilePhone() {
        return mobilePhone;
    }

    public void setMobilePhone(String mobilePhone) {
        this.mobilePhone = mobilePhone;
    }

    public String getUsername() {
        return username;
    }

    public void setUsername(String username) {
        this.username = username;
    }

    public String getEmail() {
        return email;
    }

    public void setEmail(String email) {
        this.email = email;
    }

    public String getPassword() {
        return password;
    }

    public void setPassword(String password) {
        this.password = password;
    }

    public BigDecimal getCashFund() {
        return cashFund;
    }

    public void setCashFund(BigDecimal cashFund) {
        this.cashFund = cashFund;
    }

}

Custom validator Here is where I try to inject the repository. The repository is always null if not when I disable Hibernate validation.

    public class UserValidator implements ConstraintValidator<ValidUser, User> {
    private Logger log = LogManager.getLogger();

    @Autowired
    private UserRepository userRepository;

    @Override
    public void initialize(ValidUser constraintAnnotation) {
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isValid(User value, ConstraintValidatorContext context) {
        try {
            User foundUser = userRepository.findByUsername(value.getUsername());

            if (foundUser != null && foundUser.getId() != value.getId()) {
                context.disableDefaultConstraintViolation();
                context.buildConstraintViolationWithTemplate("{ValidUser.unique.username}").addConstraintViolation();

                return false;
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            log.error("", e);
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

}

messages.properties

#CUSTOM VALIDATORS
ValidUser.message = I dati inseriti non sono validi. Verificare nuovamente e ripetere l'operazione.
ValidUser.unique.username = L'username [${validatedValue.getUsername()}] è già stato utilizzato. Sceglierne un altro e ripetere l'operazione.

#DEFAULT VALIDATORS
org.hibernate.validator.constraints.NotBlank.message = Il campo non può essere vuoto

# === USER ===
Pattern.user.landlinePhone = Il numero di telefono non è valido. Dovrebbe essere nel formato E.123 internazionale (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E.123)

In my tests, you can try from the source code, I've two problems:

  1. The injected repository inside UserValidator is null if I don't disable Hibernate validation (spring.jpa.properties.javax.persistence.validation.mode=none)
  2. Even if I disable Hibernate validator, my test cases fail because something prevent Spring to use the default string interpolation for validation messages that should be something like [Constraint].[class name lowercase].[propertyName]. I don't want to use the constraint annotation with the value element like this @NotBlank(message="{mycustom.message}") because I don't see the point considering that has his own convetion for interpolation and I can take advantage of that...that means less coding.

I attach the code; you can just run Junit tests and see errors (Hibernate validation is enable, check application.properties).

What am I doing wrong? What could I do to solve those two problems?

====== UPDATE ======

Just to clarify, reading Spring validation documentation https://docs.spring.io/spring/docs/current/spring-framework-reference/core.html#validation-beanvalidation-spring-constraints they say:

By default, the LocalValidatorFactoryBean configures a SpringConstraintValidatorFactory that uses Spring to create ConstraintValidator instances. This allows your custom ConstraintValidators to benefit from dependency injection like any other Spring bean.

As you can see, a ConstraintValidator implementation may have its dependencies @Autowired like any other Spring bean.

In my configuration class I created my LocalValidatorFactoryBean as they write.

Another interesting questions are this and this, but I had not luck with them.

====== UPDATE 2 ======

After a lot of reseach, seems with Hibernate validator the injection is not provided.

I found a couple of way you can do that:

1st way

Create this configuration class:

 @Configuration
public class HibernateValidationConfiguration extends HibernateJpaAutoConfiguration {

    public HibernateValidationConfiguration(DataSource dataSource, JpaProperties jpaProperties,
            ObjectProvider<JtaTransactionManager> jtaTransactionManager,
            ObjectProvider<TransactionManagerCustomizers> transactionManagerCustomizers) {
        super(dataSource, jpaProperties, jtaTransactionManager, transactionManagerCustomizers);
    }

    @Autowired
    private Validator validator;

    @Override
    protected void customizeVendorProperties(Map<String, Object> vendorProperties) {
        super.customizeVendorProperties(vendorProperties);
        vendorProperties.put("javax.persistence.validation.factory", validator);
    }
}

2nd way

Create an utility bean

    @Service
public class BeanUtil implements ApplicationContextAware {

    private static ApplicationContext context;

    @Override

    public void setApplicationContext(ApplicationContext applicationContext) throws BeansException {

        context = applicationContext;

    }

    public static <T> T getBean(Class<T> beanClass) {

        return context.getBean(beanClass);

    }

}

and then in the validator initialization:

@Override
 public void initialize(ValidUser constraintAnnotation) {
 userRepository = BeanUtil.getBean(UserRepository.class);
 em = BeanUtil.getBean(EntityManager.class);
 }

very important

In both cases, in order to make the it works you have to "reset" the entity manager in this way:

@Override
public boolean isValid(User value, ConstraintValidatorContext context) {
    try {
        em.setFlushMode(FlushModeType.COMMIT);
        //your code
    } finally {
        em.setFlushMode(FlushModeType.AUTO);
    }
}

Anyway, I don't know if this is really a safe way. Probably it's not a good practice access to the persistence layer at all.

0

If you really need to use injection in your Validator try adding @Configurable annotation on it:

@Configurable(autowire = Autowire.BY_TYPE, dependencyCheck = true)
public class UserValidator implements ConstraintValidator<ValidUser, User> {
    private Logger log = LogManager.getLogger();

    @Autowired
    private UserRepository userRepository;

    // this initialize method wouldn't be needed if you use HV 6.0 as it has a default implementation now
    @Override
    public void initialize(ValidUser constraintAnnotation) {
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isValid(User value, ConstraintValidatorContext context) {
        try {
            User foundUser = userRepository.findByUsername( value.getUsername() );

            if ( foundUser != null && foundUser.getId() != value.getId() ) {
                context.disableDefaultConstraintViolation();
                context.buildConstraintViolationWithTemplate( "{ValidUser.unique.username}" ).addConstraintViolation();

                return false;
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            log.error( "", e );
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

}

From the documentation to that annotation:

Marks a class as being eligible for Spring-driven configuration

So this should solve your null problem. To make it work though, you would need to configure AspectJ... (Check how to use @Configurable in Spring for that)

  • Thanks for the reply. I updated my question pointing out the dependency injection should work without any special trick based on what they say. However I'm trying to follow your way using EnableSpringConfigured and EnableLoadTimeWeaving but the injected repository is always null. – drenda Oct 6 '17 at 9:47

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