71

What is the difference between injecting service with public and private.I see most of examples use private keyword in angular component. Would it have any implications of using public? e.g.

constructor(public carService: CarService) { }

vs.

constructor(private carService: CarService) { }

4 Answers 4

92

In addition to the prior answer ... anything marked as private cannot be accessed by the component's template either. (Private members can be accessed when using JIT, such as at development time, but not when using AOT, such as for production.)

So in your template, you could only do *ngIf='carService.isValid' if the injected service was marked as public.

But actually, best practice is to wrap any service properties/methods in a component property/method anyway and have the template bind to/call the component's property or method.

Something like this:

   get isValid(): boolean {
      return this.carService.isValid;
   }

And then access it like this: *ngIf='isValid'

8
  • 1
    I tried to use syntax as you set out "get isValid(): boolean{..}, but at least for my setup simply isValid(): boolean {...} worked for the functions signature.
    – Ken
    Mar 30, 2018 at 22:30
  • 8
    The above is a getter. You don't call it like a method but rather as a property assignment. It should work if you use *ngIf='isValid' and not *ngIf='isValid()'
    – DeborahK
    Apr 2, 2018 at 16:38
  • 5
    Can you point to documentation to support your statement that "best practice is to wrap any service properties/methods in a component property/method anyway and have the template bind to/call the component's property or method"? It sounds like a lot of unnecessary work. Why not make the service public readonly to protect it from future developers at compile them, and avoid having to write all the extra boilerplate?
    – Troy Weber
    Mar 19, 2020 at 16:18
  • 2
    Posed this to the Angular GDE community ... multiple thoughts. (1) Any refactorings (renaming and such) done with your editor's tools won't find instances in the template. (2) Using the recommended view/model approach with declared Observable streams this becomes a non-issue. (3) For one-off, seems OK.
    – DeborahK
    Mar 19, 2020 at 18:57
  • 2
    Just to add and advantage of using private instead of public, if you are using VSCode, private constructor parameters that are not being used in your class will be shown in a faded color, helping you to identify injections you don't need anymore.
    – Marlon
    Sep 23, 2021 at 5:10
9

The answer is pretty simple: you have to create private variables when you don't need to use them outside of current class/component, otherwise, you should create public variables. And one more thing: you can also use private variables and give access to them from outside via special functions called getters and setters. For example:

private _customValue: any;

set customValue(newValue: any): void {
  this._customValue = newValue;
}

get customValue(): any {
  return this._customValue;
}

Notice, that _customValue is private, but you can set/get this value from outside the class via operations with customValue:

classInstance.customValue = 'newValue';
console.log(classInstance.customValue);

Need to say, that set and get keywords before method names are not strongly needed, they are more for clarification.

1
  • 1
    You don't call getters and setters, with this code you created a readonly property called getCustomValue and an unrelated write only property called setCustomValue. They should both be named customValue and treated like a property Feb 25, 2019 at 18:13
5

For cases when you have a service for example:

import { Injectable } from '@angular/core';

@Injectable({
  providedIn: 'root'
})

export class CarService {

  constructor() { }

  public design = {
    "color": "blue"
  }
}

And in your constructor where your are going to implement the service

constructor(private carService: CarService) { }

You can use a normal method for return the service

 getCarService() {
      return this.carService;
 }

And in your template you can do

<div>{{getCarService().design.color}}</div>
5
  • 6
    calling a method in a template is not a good idea Oct 7, 2021 at 14:11
  • Can you point to documentation to support your statement that "calling a method in a template is not a good idea" ?
    – Iznogood1
    Mar 6, 2022 at 14:04
  • 2
    @Iznogood1 you don't need to find some documentation for that. just put an console.log inside of your method and see what's happening
    – AlleXyS
    Sep 30, 2022 at 8:25
  • 3
    @Iznogood1 - as mentioned above console log will show you what happens. The reason is that OnChanges has to run the method on each change to determine if the value has changed, if you use a getter or value in the template then it can do the comparison without running the function again.
    – Levidps
    Nov 21, 2022 at 5:20
  • @AniNaslyan you said: calling a method in a template is not a good idea but I guess you mean calling directly the service method but if the template calls a local methods in the same component this is valid no? (as explained in the accepted answer).
    – рüффп
    Feb 14 at 12:22
0

I don't have enough reputation, but this should be a comment on @apaternina 's answer.


calling a method in a template is not a good idea -- Ani Naslyan

True, though to avoid confusion this only counts for template expressions, so:

<button (click)="onClick()"><button>

would be ok.



as mentioned above console log will show you what happens. The reason is that OnChanges has to run the method on each change to determine if the value has changed, if you use a getter or value in the template then it can do the comparison without running the function again. -- AlleXyS

Getters are also functions, so they still get called in every OnChanges cycle. They are hard to spot in templates because they do not require () when calling them.

So avoid functions, including getters in template expressions.
Read more about this here.

If you need access to a service property in the template, I think best is to directly assign a variable to it, I agree on not injecting services as public as stated in other answers.

var: type = this.service.var;

If you had some operations in the getter, create a pure pipe for this instead.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.