61

In Cloud Firestore there are three write operations:

1) add

2) set

3) update

In the docs it says that using set(object, {merge: true}) will merge object with existing one.

The same happens when you use update(object) So what is the difference if any? It seems strange that google will duplicate logic.

134

The way I understood the difference:

  • set without merge will overwrite a document or create it if it doesn't exist yet

  • set with merge will update fields in the document or create it if it doesn't exists

  • update will update fields but will fail if the document doesn't exist

  • create will create the document but fail if the document already exists

There's also a difference in the kind of data you provide to set and update.

For set you always have to provide document-shaped data:

set(
  {a: {b: {c: true}}},
  {merge: true}
)

With update you can also use field paths for updating nested values:

update({
  'a.b.c': true
})
  • 1
    but where have you found create method in the API? – ZuzEL Oct 6 '17 at 7:49
  • 1
    cloud.google.com/nodejs/docs/reference/firestore/0.8.x/… for node.js. It seems the web API doesn't have that method. Wasn't sure which platform you are on :) – Scarygami Oct 6 '17 at 7:59
  • 5
    Another distinction you can mention is that set operates on document-shaped data, where update takes field path and value pairs. This means you can make changes to deeply nested values with update that are more cumbersome with set. For example: set({a: {b: {c: true}}}, {merge: true}) vs update('a.b.c', true). – Gil Gilbert Oct 6 '17 at 16:10
  • If I want to update a value in a document, It makes sense that I want to update documents that already exists, so I think set + mergeall is not that usefull because it will creat it the document does not exists – John Balvin Arias Aug 11 '18 at 21:12
46

Another difference (extending Scarygami's answer) between "set with merge" and "update", is when working with a nested values.

if you have a document structured like this:

 {
   "friends": {
     "friend-uid-1": true,
     "friend-uid-2": true,
   }
 }

and want to add {"friend-uid-3" : true}

using this:

db.collection('users').doc('random-id').set({ "friends": { "friend-uid-3": true } },{merge:true})

will result in this data:

 {
   "friends": {
     "friend-uid-1": true,
     "friend-uid-2": true,
     "friend-uid-3": true
   }
 }

however update using this:

db.collection('users').doc('random-id').update({ "friends": { "friend-uid-3": true } })

will result in this data:

 `{
   "friends": {
     "friend-uid-3": true
   }
 }`
  • Have you tried testing this yourself? There is a section in the documentation: "To update some fields of a document without overwriting the entire document, use the update() method..."link – Finlay Percy Jun 6 '18 at 10:03
  • yes I have tested this. It was a few weeks ago, but I am positive I came out with the result I wrote. I searched up why it didn't work as expected etc. I will test it out now. – ravo10 Jun 6 '18 at 10:16
  • 2
    I figured it out. I only tried this with an array before. Where I wanted to add an object to the array, and everything got overwritten for that array. It does not work with fields containing an array... it does stand it docs. – ravo10 Jun 6 '18 at 11:24
  • 1
    Just got to the same conclusion after tests. I hope they will add an option that has the same effect as { merge: true } to the update function. – Johnride Mar 13 at 0:47
  • Thanks for this answer! The examples, though simple, made it more clean than the accepted answer which one was better for my usecase. – naiveai Jun 20 at 16:00

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