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I want to read from input file, my code is like following:

    int main(int argc, char* argv[])
    {
     /* 1st arg: input file name , 2nd arg: output file name */
     cout<<argc<<endl;

     ifstream input_file;

     input_file.open(argc);

     return 0;
     }

Q1. When I print argc, argc = 3? Where does the magic 3 come from?

Q2. Since type of argc is int, I should read argc to a const char*, then input_file.open() right?

Q3. argv is my output name, but why is the type of argv[] is char*. I expect type of argv to be string, since name of output file is string

I am really new to C++

Thanks in advance :)

  • I recommend you do something like for (int i = 0; i < argc; ++i) std::cout << "argv[" << i << "] = " << argv[i] << '\n'; Then you can easily see what's going on. – Some programmer dude Oct 6 '17 at 6:43
  • 1
    Please read the documentation. – n.m. Oct 6 '17 at 6:52
  • @Someprogrammerdude oh! it is working now! Thx! :))))) – Mengge Oct 6 '17 at 6:55
  • You really need to get yourself a good C++ introduction book before you hurt yourself. Generally C++ is extremely unforgiving and you'll need to consult your reference material before using anything unfamiliar, it will rarely operate the way you intuitively expect. A good book is the difference between stumbling around blindly and having your programs crash "for no reason" or knowing the fundamentals and being able to use the tools effectively. – tadman Oct 6 '17 at 7:12
1

Q1. When I print argc, argc = 3? Where does the magic 3 come from?

argc and argv are used in command line to pass input to your program. argc stores the number of inputs passed, argv stores the value of the inputs.

argv is declared as a char*[], that is to say an array of pointer to char. It means that each input you pass, indipendently from its nature (number, character or whatever else) will be consider as char* and will be an element of that vector.

From command line, you can execute your program typing:

./myProgram input1 input2

Now, input1 and input2 will be passed to your main function as argument. argv will be equal to the number ot input you pass + 1 since the name of your program is virtually considered an input to your program. In this case, you pass 2 input, so argv = 3.

Q2. Since type of argc is int, I should read argc to a const char*, then input_file.open() right?

No, you should read your input in this way:

input_file.open(argv[1]);  // <-- input1 is located at index 1
output_file.open(argv[2]);  // <-- input1 is located at index 2

Q3. argv is my output name, but why is the type of argv[] is char*. I expect type of argv to be string, since name of output file is string

It should be clear to you that all your inputs are stored in argv[] and that you can easly access each of them through the array:

argv[1] = imput1
argv[2] = imput2
argv[3] = imput3
...

Note: argc is usually used in a if condition to avoid to access to illegal memory region. Consider the following program:

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    std::cout << argv[1];
    std::cout << argv[2];
    std::cout << argv[3];

    return 0;
}

If you execute your program with:

./myProgram input1 input2

you'll probably get a segmentation fault error, since you are trying to access to argv[3] which does not exist since the array argv has only 3 elements.

You can prevent this crash using argc:

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    if (argc == 4)
    {
        std::cout << argv[1];
        std::cout << argv[2];
        std::cout << argv[3];
    }
    else 
        std::cout << "Please, provide 3 inputs." << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

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