5

I am trying that age old question (there are multitudes of versions around) of finding the longest substring of a string which doesn't contain repeated characters. I can't work out why my attempt doesn't work properly:

def findLongest(inputStr):
    resultSet = []
    substr = []

    for c in inputStr:
        print ("c: ", c)
        if substr == []:
            substr.append([c])
            continue

        print(substr)
        for str in substr:
            print ("c: ",c," - str: ",str,"\n")
            if c in str:
                resultSet.append(str)
                substr.remove(str)
            else:
                str.append(c)
        substr.append([c])



    print("Result set:")
    print(resultSet)
    return max(resultSet, key=len)

print (findLongest("pwwkewambb"))

When my output gets to the second 'w', it doesn't iterate over all the substr elements. I think I've done something silly, but I can't see what it is so some guidance would be appreciated! I feel like I'm going to kick myself at the answer...

The beginning of my output:

c:  p
c:  w
[['p']]
c:  w  - str:  ['p']

c:  w
[['p', 'w'], ['w']]
c:  w  - str:  ['p', 'w'] # I expect the next line to say c: w - str: ['w']

c:  k
[['w'], ['w']] # it is like the w was ignored as it is here
c:  k  - str:  ['w']

c:  k  - str:  ['w']
...

EDIT:

I replaced the for loop with

for idx, str in enumerate(substr):
    print ("c: ",c," - str: ",str,"\n")
    if c in str:
        resultSet.append(str)
        substr[idx] = []
    else:
        str.append(c)

and it produces the correct result. The only thing is that the empty element arrays get set with the next character. It seems a bit pointless; there must be a better way.

My expected output is kewamb.

e.g.

c:  p
c:  w
[['p']]
c:  w  - str:  ['p']

c:  w
[['p', 'w'], ['w']]
c:  w  - str:  ['p', 'w']

c:  w  - str:  ['w']

c:  k
[[], [], ['w']]
c:  k  - str:  []

c:  k  - str:  []

c:  k  - str:  ['w']

c:  e
[['k'], ['k'], ['w', 'k'], ['k']]
c:  e  - str:  ['k']

c:  e  - str:  ['k']

c:  e  - str:  ['w', 'k']

c:  e  - str:  ['k']
...
8
  • substr.remove(str): doing that while iterating is bad Oct 6 '17 at 20:29
  • ah really? didn't know that. I tried using str = [] before and that didn't work so starting using remove
    – dgBP
    Oct 6 '17 at 20:30
  • am I thinking about this the wrong way - is there a more intuitive solution?
    – dgBP
    Oct 6 '17 at 20:31
  • you should mention the expected output. Is that "kewamb" ? Oct 6 '17 at 20:42
  • Ah, yes. I'll edit it. I tried out something which got the expected output, but isn't a perfect solution.
    – dgBP
    Oct 6 '17 at 20:45
2

Edit, per comment by @seymour on incorrect responses:

def find_longest(s):
    _longest = set()
    def longest(x):
         if x in _longest:
             _longest.clear()
             return False
         _longest.add(x)
         return True
    return ''.join(max((list(g) for _, g in groupby(s, key=longest)), key=len))

And test:

In [101]: assert find_longest('pwwkewambb') == 'kewamb'

In [102]: assert find_longest('abcabcbb') == 'abc'

In [103]: assert find_longest('abczxyabczxya') == 'abczxy'

Old answer:

from itertools import groupby

s = set() ## for mutable access

''.join(max((list(g) for _, g in groupby('pwwkewambb', key=lambda x: not ((s and x == s.pop()) or s.add(x)))), key=len))
'kewamb'

groupby returns an iterator grouped based on the function provided in the key argument, which by default is lambda x: x. Instead of the default we are utilizing some state by using a mutable structure (which could have been done a more intuitive way if using a normal function)

lambda x: not ((s and x == s.pop()) or s.add(x))

What is happening here is since I can't reassign a global assignment in a lambda (again I can do this, using a proper function), I just created a global mutable structure that I can add/remove. The key (no pun) is that I only keep elements that I need by using a short circuit to add/remove items as needed.

max and len are fairly self explanatory, to get the longest list produced by groupby

Another version without the mutable global structure business:

def longest(x):
     if hasattr(longest, 'last'):
         result = not (longest.last == x)
         longest.last = x
         return result
     longest.last = x
     return True


''.join(max((list(g) for _, g in groupby('pwwkewambb', key=longest)), key=len))
'kewamb'
7
  • I wouldn't call that intuitive but that's very good. Care to explain to the world how it works? Oct 6 '17 at 21:00
  • This is some kind of genius. An explanation would make my life easier, too!
    – dgBP
    Oct 6 '17 at 21:09
  • It's using groupby to create groups with characters not similar, using side effect in the key to add or remove from set, and use max to compute max string. Same principle as my solution but one-liner & comprehensions. Really nice. Oct 6 '17 at 21:13
  • I admit I had to google the question to see if it wasn't plagiarism because 1) it's very good 2) I don't know that user whereas I'm here like a lot and 3) no explanation. Didn't find that anywhere else. Please explain more, you'll get more upvotes. Oct 6 '17 at 21:15
  • @Jean-FrançoisFabre explanation coming, I was bored at work. I would admit plagiarism but I can claim this one as my own, borrowing heavily from things I seen of course. Oct 6 '17 at 21:16
2

Not sure what is wrong in your attempt, but it's complex and in:

    for str in substr:
        print ("c: ",c," - str: ",str,"\n")
        if c in str:
            resultSet.append(str)
            substr.remove(str)

you're removing elements from a list while iterating on it: don't do that, it gives unexpected results.

Anyway, my solution, not sure it's intuitive, but it's probably simpler & shorter:

  • slice the string with an increasing index
  • for each slice, create a set and store letters until you reach the end of the string or a letter is already in the set. Your index is the max length
  • compute the max of this length for every iteration & store the corresponding string

Code:

def findLongest(s):
    maxlen = 0
    longest = ""
    for i in range(0,len(s)):
        subs = s[i:]
        chars = set()
        for j,c in enumerate(subs):
            if c in chars:
                break
            else:
                chars.add(c)
        else:
            # add 1 when end of string is reached (no break)
            # handles the case where the longest string is at the end
            j+=1
        if j>maxlen:
            maxlen=j
            longest=s[i:i+j]
    return longest

print(findLongest("pwwkewambb"))

result:

kewamb
4
  • Good answer, but the case "bbbb" doesn't produce the expected "b"
    – dgBP
    Oct 6 '17 at 21:07
  • yes, fixed (edge cases / index values to tune): now it works. Oct 6 '17 at 21:11
  • I just realised this has a "for else" which I don't remember ever coming across. Learnt something else new.
    – dgBP
    Oct 6 '17 at 21:16
  • that's a nice feature to avoid the use of a cumbersome flag. Oct 6 '17 at 21:16
1

Depends on your definition of repeated characters: if you mean consecutive, then the approved solution is slick, but not of characters appearing more than once (e.g.: pwwkewabmb -> 'kewabmb' ).

Here's what I came up with (Python 2):

def longest(word):
    begin = 0
    end = 0
    longest = (0,0)
    for i in xrange(len(word)):
        try:
            j = word.index(word[i],begin,end)
            # longest?
            if end-begin >= longest[1]-longest[0]:
                longest = (begin,end)
            begin = j+1
            if begin==end:
                end += 1
        except:
            end = i+1
    end=i+1
    if end-begin >= longest[1]-longest[0]:
        longest = (begin,end)
    return word[slice(*longest)]

Thus

>>> print longest('pwwkewabmb')
kewabm
>>> print longest('pwwkewambb')
kewamb
>>> print longest('bbbb')
b
1

My 2-cents:

from collections import Counter

def longest_unique_substr(s: str) -> str:

    # get all substr-ings from s, starting with the longest one
    for substr_len in range(len(s), 0, -1):
        for substr_start_index in range(0, len(s) - substr_len + 1):
            substr = s[substr_start_index : substr_start_index + substr_len]

            # check if all substr characters are unique
            c = Counter(substr)
            if all(v == 1 for v in c.values()):
                return substr

    # ensure empty string input returns ""
    return ""

Run:

In : longest_unique_substr('pwwkewambb')
Out: 'kewamb'
0
0
s=input()
ma=0
n=len(s)
l=[]
a=[]
d={}
st=0;i=0
while i<n:
    if s[i] not in d:
        d[s[i]]=i
        l.append(s[i])
    else:
        t=d[s[i]]
        d[s[i]]=i
        s=s[t+1:]
        d={}
        n=len(s)
        if len(l)>=3:
            a.append(l)
            ma=max(ma,len(l))
        l=[];i=-1
    i=i+1
if len(l)!=0 and len(l)>=3:
    a.append(l)
    ma=max(ma,len(l))
if len(a)==0:
    print("-1")
else:
    for i in a:
        if len(i)==ma:
            for j in i:
                print(j,end="")
            break
1
  • 2
    Can you provide an example of inputs and outputs so that the efficacy of your code can be assessed.
    – NaN
    Apr 23 '20 at 3:28

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