166

I want to write a function that returns the nearest next power of 2 number. For example if my input is 789, the output should be 1024. Is there any way of achieving this without using any loops but just using some bitwise operators?

22 Answers 22

128

Check the Bit Twiddling Hacks. You need to get the base 2 logarithm, then add 1 to that. Example for a 32-bit value:

Round up to the next highest power of 2

unsigned int v; // compute the next highest power of 2 of 32-bit v

v--;
v |= v >> 1;
v |= v >> 2;
v |= v >> 4;
v |= v >> 8;
v |= v >> 16;
v++;

The extension to other widths should be obvious.

  • 9
    This is not the most efficient solution because many processors have special instruction for counting leading zeros which can be used to compute log2 very efficiently. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Find_first_set – Simon Oct 4 '13 at 21:57
  • 5
    @Simon: it's the portable solution. There's no common efficient algorithm for all architectures – phuclv Dec 6 '13 at 9:27
  • 5
    What if the number itself is a power of two? – Litherum Dec 19 '13 at 19:34
  • 3
    The link is dead. – Mehrdad Jun 26 '16 at 11:49
  • 15
    This is why links should never suffice as an answer... – lemon Jul 3 '16 at 9:05
77
next = pow(2, ceil(log(x)/log(2)));

This works by finding the number you'd have raise 2 by to get x (take the log of the number, and divide by the log of the desired base, see wikipedia for more). Then round that up with ceil to get the nearest whole number power.

This is a more general purpose (i.e. slower!) method than the bitwise methods linked elsewhere, but good to know the maths, eh?

  • 7
    Don't see much that's a bitwise operator here... – Jonathan Leffler Jan 21 '09 at 17:50
  • 2
    From C99, you can also just use log2 if supported by your tools. GCC and VS don't seem to :( – Matthew Read Jan 22 '12 at 5:49
  • 10
    Be careful about float accuracy, though. log(pow(2,29))/log(2) = 29.000000000000004, so the result is 230 instead of returning 229. I think this is why log2 functions exist? – endolith Dec 9 '13 at 2:52
  • 34
    The cost of this is probably at least 200 cycles and it's not even correct. Why does this have so many upvotes? – Axel Gneiting Aug 18 '15 at 20:17
  • 4
    @SuperflyJon But it mentions bitwise operators and I assume correctness is implied by any question unless noted otherwise. – BlackJack May 2 '17 at 16:02
50
unsigned long upper_power_of_two(unsigned long v)
{
    v--;
    v |= v >> 1;
    v |= v >> 2;
    v |= v >> 4;
    v |= v >> 8;
    v |= v >> 16;
    v++;
    return v;

}
  • 51
    Would be nice if you have attributed it (unless you discovered it). It comes from the bit twiddling hacks page. – florin Jan 21 '09 at 17:47
  • 2
    Is that for a 32-bit number? Extension for 64-bit? – Jonathan Leffler Jan 21 '09 at 17:52
  • 5
    @florin, if v is a 64-bit type, couldn't you just add a "c |= v >> 32" after the one for 16? – Evan Teran Jan 21 '09 at 18:18
  • 8
  • 2
    Code that only works for a specific bit width should be using fixed-width types instead of minimum-width types. This function should take and return a uint32_t. – Craig Barnes Sep 21 '18 at 21:38
46

I think this works, too:

int power = 1;
while(power < x)
    power*=2;

And the answer is power.

  • 16
    Fair enough the question asked for no loops. But as clever as some of the other functions are, for code that is not performance sensitive the answer that is quickly and easily understood and verified to be correct always wins for me. – Tim MB Jan 17 '13 at 12:44
  • 2
    This is not returning the nearest power of 2, butthe power of that is immediatly bigger than X. Still very good – GameDeveloper Jun 9 '13 at 16:34
  • Instead of multiplying, some bitwise "magic" can be used instead power <<= 1 – Vallentin Jul 30 '16 at 8:01
  • 4
    @Vallentin That should be automatically optimized by a compiler. – MarkWeston Oct 5 '17 at 5:59
  • 2
    Beware of infinite loop if x is too large (i.e. not enough bits to represent the next power of 2). – alban Mar 22 at 14:01
30

If you're using GCC, you might want to have a look at Optimizing the next_pow2() function by Lockless Inc.. This page describes a way to use built-in function builtin_clz() (count leading zero) and later use directly x86 (ia32) assembler instruction bsr (bit scan reverse), just like it's described in another answer's link to gamedev site. This code might be faster than those described in previous answer.

By the way, if you're not going to use assembler instruction and 64bit data type, you can use this

/**
 * return the smallest power of two value
 * greater than x
 *
 * Input range:  [2..2147483648]
 * Output range: [2..2147483648]
 *
 */
__attribute__ ((const))
static inline uint32_t p2(uint32_t x)
{
#if 0
    assert(x > 1);
    assert(x <= ((UINT32_MAX/2) + 1));
#endif

    return 1 << (32 - __builtin_clz (x - 1));
}
  • 1
    Note that this returns the smallest power of 2 greater than OR equal to x. Changing (x -1) to x changes the function to return the smaller power of 2 greater than x. – Guillaume Jul 28 '13 at 18:50
  • 1
    You can use _BitScanForward on Visual C++ – KindDragon Dec 5 '13 at 10:25
  • You can also use __builtin_ctz() – MarkP Mar 31 '16 at 18:21
  • @MarkP __builtin_ctz() won't be useful to round any non power of 2 number up to the next power of two – Yann Droneaud Apr 1 '16 at 12:42
  • 1
    Please add in your answer a link to Wikipedia list of builtin bitwise functions for other compilers: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Find_first_set#Tool_and_library_support                                Please provide also a 64-bits version. I propose the following C++11 function:              constexpr uint64_t nextPowerOfTwo64 (uint64_t x) { return 1ULL<<(sizeof(uint64_t) * 8 - __builtin_clzll(x)); } – olibre Apr 9 '17 at 2:50
15

One more, although I use cycle, but thi is much faster than math operands

power of two "floor" option:

int power = 1;
while (x >>= 1) power <<= 1;

power of two "ceil" option:

int power = 2;
x--;    // <<-- UPDATED
while (x >>= 1) power <<= 1;

UPDATE

As mentioned in comments there was mistake in ceil where its result was wrong.

Here are full functions:

unsigned power_floor(unsigned x) {
    int power = 1;
    while (x >>= 1) power <<= 1;
    return power;
}

unsigned power_ceil(unsigned x) {
    if (x <= 1) return 1;
    int power = 2;
    x--;
    while (x >>= 1) power <<= 1;
    return power;
}
  • Best answer. I am using this one. – CDR Feb 4 '15 at 17:19
  • 2
    the result is not correct if x is power of 2. A micro to test if input is power of 2 is needed. #define ISPOW2(x) ((x) > 0 && !((x) & (x-1))) – pgplus1628 Oct 28 '15 at 13:05
  • @zorksylar more efficiently would be to if (x == 0) return 1; /* Or 0 (Which is what I use) */ x--; /* Rest of program */ – YoYoYonnY Mar 3 '16 at 16:45
  • Good solution! but the power of two "ceil" option is not correct. For example, when x = 2 the result should be 2 instead of 4 – MZD Aug 18 '18 at 12:02
9

For any unsigned type, building on the Bit Twiddling Hacks:

#include <climits>
#include <type_traits>

template <typename UnsignedType>
UnsignedType round_up_to_power_of_2(UnsignedType v) {
  static_assert(std::is_unsigned<UnsignedType>::value, "Only works for unsigned types");
  v--;
  for (size_t i = 1; i < sizeof(v) * CHAR_BIT; i *= 2) //Prefer size_t "Warning comparison between signed and unsigned integer"
  {
    v |= v >> i;
  }
  return ++v;
}

There isn't really a loop there as the compiler knows at compile time the number of iterations.

  • 2
    Note that the question is about C. – martinkunev Apr 7 '17 at 12:47
  • @martinkunev Just replace UnsignedType and process it manually. I am pretty sure a C programmer can expand this simple template ignoring the std::is_unsigned<UnsignedType>::value assertion. – user877329 Jun 1 '17 at 17:53
  • 1
    @user877329 Sure, it would be nice to have an answer in Javascript as well, just in case somebody wants to translate that to C. – martinkunev Jun 1 '17 at 18:10
  • @martinkunev UnsignedType in JavaScript? Anyway, this solution shows how to do it for any UnsignedType, and it happen to be written in C++, rather than pseudocode [ sizeof(v)*CHAR_BIT instead of something like number of bits in an object of UnsignedType ]. – user877329 Jun 1 '17 at 18:46
8

For IEEE floats you'd be able to do something like this.

int next_power_of_two(float a_F){
    int f = *(int*)&a_F;
    int b = f << 9 != 0; // If we're a power of two this is 0, otherwise this is 1

    f >>= 23; // remove factional part of floating point number
    f -= 127; // subtract 127 (the bias) from the exponent

    // adds one to the exponent if were not a power of two, 
    // then raises our new exponent to the power of two again.
    return (1 << (f + b)); 
}

If you need an integer solution and you're able to use inline assembly, BSR will give you the log2 of an integer on the x86. It counts how many right bits are set, which is exactly equal to the log2 of that number. Other processors have similar instructions (often), such as CLZ and depending on your compiler there might be an intrinsic available to do the work for you.

  • This is an interesting one eventhough not related to the question ( I want to roundoff only integers), will try out this one.. – Naveen Jan 21 '09 at 18:29
  • Came up with it after reading the wikipedia article on floats. Besides that, I've used it to calculate square-roots in integer precision. Also nice, but even more unrelated. – Jasper Bekkers Jan 21 '09 at 18:32
  • This breaks the strict aliasing rules. On some compilers it may not work or issue a warning. – martinkunev Dec 1 '17 at 16:54
5
/*
** http://graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html#IntegerLog
*/
#define __LOG2A(s) ((s &0xffffffff00000000) ? (32 +__LOG2B(s >>32)): (__LOG2B(s)))
#define __LOG2B(s) ((s &0xffff0000)         ? (16 +__LOG2C(s >>16)): (__LOG2C(s)))
#define __LOG2C(s) ((s &0xff00)             ? (8  +__LOG2D(s >>8)) : (__LOG2D(s)))
#define __LOG2D(s) ((s &0xf0)               ? (4  +__LOG2E(s >>4)) : (__LOG2E(s)))
#define __LOG2E(s) ((s &0xc)                ? (2  +__LOG2F(s >>2)) : (__LOG2F(s)))
#define __LOG2F(s) ((s &0x2)                ? (1)                  : (0))

#define LOG2_UINT64 __LOG2A
#define LOG2_UINT32 __LOG2B
#define LOG2_UINT16 __LOG2C
#define LOG2_UINT8  __LOG2D

static inline uint64_t
next_power_of_2(uint64_t i)
{
#if defined(__GNUC__)
    return 1UL <<(1 +(63 -__builtin_clzl(i -1)));
#else
    i =i -1;
    i =LOG2_UINT64(i);
    return 1UL <<(1 +i);
#endif
}

If you do not want to venture into the realm of undefined behaviour the input value must be between 1 and 2^63. The macro is also useful to set constant at compile time.

  • This is the probably the worst solution (it's also missing ULL suffix on the 64-bit constant). This will generate 32 tests per input in all cases. Better to use a while loop, it'll always be faster or at the same speed. – xryl669 Apr 29 '16 at 14:33
  • BUT... this can be evaluated by the preprocessor if the input is a constant, and thus ZERO operation at run time! – Michael Sep 13 at 16:53
5

For completeness here is a floating-point implementation in bog-standard C.

double next_power_of_two(double value) {
    int exp;
    if(frexp(value, &exp) == 0.5) {
        // Omit this case to round precise powers of two up to the *next* power
        return value;
    }
    return ldexp(1.0, exp);
}
  • 1
    Random browsers, if you read this comment, choose this code.This is clearly the best answer, no special instructions, no bit twiddling, just efficient, portable and standard code. Guessing why no one else upvoted it ^^ – GameDeveloper Oct 25 '15 at 21:36
  • 5
    Random browsers, this is going to be dead slow if you don't have specialized floating point hardware. On x86 you can run circles around this code using bit twiddling. rep bsr ecx,eax; mov eax,0; cmovnz eax,2; shl eax,cl is about 25x faster. – Johan Mar 31 '16 at 15:31
3

In x86 you can use the sse4 bit manipulation instructions to make it fast.

//assume input is in eax
popcnt edx,eax
lzcnt ecx,eax
cmp edx,1
jle @done       //popcnt says its a power of 2, return input unchanged
mov eax,2
shl eax,cl
@done: rep ret

In c you can use the matching intrinsics.

  • Useless but AWESOME! – Marco Jul 19 '17 at 9:12
3

An efficient Microsoft (e.g., Visual Studio 2017) specific solution in C / C++ for integer input. Handles the case of the input exactly matching a power of two value by decrementing before checking the location of the most significant 1 bit.

inline unsigned int ExpandToPowerOf2(unsigned int Value)
{
    unsigned long Index;
    _BitScanReverse(&Index, Value - 1);
    return (1U << (Index + 1));
}

// - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

#if defined(WIN64) // The _BitScanReverse64 intrinsic is only available for 64 bit builds because it depends on x64

inline unsigned long long ExpandToPowerOf2(unsigned long long Value)
{
    unsigned long Index;
    _BitScanReverse64(&Index, Value - 1);
    return (1ULL << (Index + 1));
}

#endif

This generates 5 or so inlined instructions for an Intel processor similar to the following:

dec eax
bsr rcx, rax
inc ecx
mov eax, 1
shl rax, cl

Apparently the Visual Studio C++ compiler isn't coded to optimize this for compile-time values, but it's not like there are a whole lot of instructions there.

Edit:

If you want an input value of 1 to yield 1 (2 to the zeroth power), a small modification to the above code still generates straight through instructions with no branch.

inline unsigned int ExpandToPowerOf2(unsigned int Value)
{
    unsigned long Index;
    _BitScanReverse(&Index, --Value);
    if (Value == 0)
        Index = (unsigned long) -1;
    return (1U << (Index + 1));
}

Generates just a few more instructions. The trick is that Index can be replaced by a test followed by a cmove instruction.

  • A small mistake: It should return 1 for 1, it does not though. – 0kcats Aug 30 '18 at 18:00
  • Thanks. In the application for which it was developed we explicitly needed 2 to the first power when 1 is input. 1 could be taken as a special case with a conditional without generating too many more instructions I imagine. – NoelC Aug 31 '18 at 23:30
  • Updated the answer to include a version that returns 1 for an input value of 1. – NoelC Sep 1 '18 at 2:53
2

Here's my solution in C. Hope this helps!

int next_power_of_two(int n) {
    int i = 0;
    for (--n; n > 0; n >>= 1) {
        i++;
    }
    return 1 << i;
}
1

Despite the question is tagged as c here my five cents. Lucky us, C++ 20 would include std::ceil2 and std::floor2 (see here). It is consexpr template functions, current GCC implementation uses bitshifting and works with any integral unsigned type.

0

Many processor architectures support log base 2 or very similar operation – count leading zeros. Many compilers have intrinsics for it. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Find_first_set

  • it's not about finding the highest set bit (=bsr) or counting leading zeros. he wants to round up to nearest power of 2. the answer with "subtract 1, then do bsr and shift 1 left" does that. – Flo Oct 13 '18 at 17:23
0

Assuming you have a good compiler & it can do the bit twiddling before hand thats above me at this point, but anyway this works!!!

    // http://graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html#IntegerLogObvious
    #define SH1(v)  ((v-1) | ((v-1) >> 1))            // accidently came up w/ this...
    #define SH2(v)  ((v) | ((v) >> 2))
    #define SH4(v)  ((v) | ((v) >> 4))
    #define SH8(v)  ((v) | ((v) >> 8))
    #define SH16(v) ((v) | ((v) >> 16))
    #define OP(v) (SH16(SH8(SH4(SH2(SH1(v))))))         

    #define CB0(v)   ((v) - (((v) >> 1) & 0x55555555))
    #define CB1(v)   (((v) & 0x33333333) + (((v) >> 2) & 0x33333333))
    #define CB2(v)   ((((v) + ((v) >> 4) & 0xF0F0F0F) * 0x1010101) >> 24)
    #define CBSET(v) (CB2(CB1(CB0((v)))))
    #define FLOG2(v) (CBSET(OP(v)))

Test code below:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

// http://graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html#IntegerLogObvious
#define SH1(v)  ((v-1) | ((v-1) >> 1))  // accidently guess this...
#define SH2(v)  ((v) | ((v) >> 2))
#define SH4(v)  ((v) | ((v) >> 4))
#define SH8(v)  ((v) | ((v) >> 8))
#define SH16(v) ((v) | ((v) >> 16))
#define OP(v) (SH16(SH8(SH4(SH2(SH1(v))))))         

#define CB0(v)   ((v) - (((v) >> 1) & 0x55555555))
#define CB1(v)   (((v) & 0x33333333) + (((v) >> 2) & 0x33333333))
#define CB2(v)   ((((v) + ((v) >> 4) & 0xF0F0F0F) * 0x1010101) >> 24)
#define CBSET(v) (CB2(CB1(CB0((v)))))
#define FLOG2(v) (CBSET(OP(v))) 

#define SZ4         FLOG2(4)
#define SZ6         FLOG2(6)
#define SZ7         FLOG2(7)
#define SZ8         FLOG2(8) 
#define SZ9         FLOG2(9)
#define SZ16        FLOG2(16)
#define SZ17        FLOG2(17)
#define SZ127       FLOG2(127)
#define SZ1023      FLOG2(1023)
#define SZ1024      FLOG2(1024)
#define SZ2_17      FLOG2((1ul << 17))  // 
#define SZ_LOG2     FLOG2(SZ)

#define DBG_PRINT(x) do { std::printf("Line:%-4d" "  %10s = %-10d\n", __LINE__, #x, x); } while(0);

uint32_t arrTble[FLOG2(63)];

int main(){
    int8_t n;

    DBG_PRINT(SZ4);    
    DBG_PRINT(SZ6);    
    DBG_PRINT(SZ7);    
    DBG_PRINT(SZ8);    
    DBG_PRINT(SZ9); 
    DBG_PRINT(SZ16);
    DBG_PRINT(SZ17);
    DBG_PRINT(SZ127);
    DBG_PRINT(SZ1023);
    DBG_PRINT(SZ1024);
    DBG_PRINT(SZ2_17);

    return(0);
}

Outputs:

Line:39           SZ4 = 2
Line:40           SZ6 = 3
Line:41           SZ7 = 3
Line:42           SZ8 = 3
Line:43           SZ9 = 4
Line:44          SZ16 = 4
Line:45          SZ17 = 5
Line:46         SZ127 = 7
Line:47        SZ1023 = 10
Line:48        SZ1024 = 10
Line:49        SZ2_16 = 17
0

I'm trying to get nearest lower power of 2 and made this function. May it help you.Just multiplied nearest lower number times 2 to get nearest upper power of 2

int nearest_upper_power(int number){
    int temp=number;
    while((number&(number-1))!=0){
        temp<<=1;
        number&=temp;
    }
    //Here number is closest lower power 
    number*=2;
    return number;
}
0

Adapted Paul Dixon's answer to Excel, this works perfectly.

 =POWER(2,CEILING.MATH(LOG(A1)/LOG(2)))
0

A variant of @YannDroneaud answer valid for x==1, only for x86 plateforms, compilers, gcc or clang:

__attribute__ ((const))
static inline uint32_t p2(uint32_t x)
{
#if 0
    assert(x > 0);
    assert(x <= ((UINT32_MAX/2) + 1));
#endif
  int clz;
  uint32_t xm1 = x-1;
  asm(
    "lzcnt %1,%0"
    :"=r" (clz)
    :"rm" (xm1)
    :"cc"
    );
    return 1 << (32 - clz);
}
0

Here is what I'm using to have this be a constant expression, if the input is a constant expression.

#define uptopow2_0(v) ((v) - 1)
#define uptopow2_1(v) (uptopow2_0(v) | uptopow2_0(v) >> 1)
#define uptopow2_2(v) (uptopow2_1(v) | uptopow2_1(v) >> 2)
#define uptopow2_3(v) (uptopow2_2(v) | uptopow2_2(v) >> 4)
#define uptopow2_4(v) (uptopow2_3(v) | uptopow2_3(v) >> 8)
#define uptopow2_5(v) (uptopow2_4(v) | uptopow2_4(v) >> 16)

#define uptopow2(v) (uptopow2_5(v) + 1)  /* this is the one programmer uses */

So for instance, an expression like:

uptopow2(sizeof (struct foo))

will nicely reduce to a constant.

0

You might find the following clarification to be helpful towards your purpose:

-1

If you need it for OpenGL related stuff:

/* Compute the nearest power of 2 number that is 
 * less than or equal to the value passed in. 
 */
static GLuint 
nearestPower( GLuint value )
{
    int i = 1;

    if (value == 0) return -1;      /* Error! */
    for (;;) {
         if (value == 1) return i;
         else if (value == 3) return i*4;
         value >>= 1; i *= 2;
    }
}
  • 7
    'for' is a loop. – florin Jan 21 '09 at 17:46
  • 1
    florin: it is. and it is used as a loop here, isn't it? – Tamas Czinege Jan 21 '09 at 17:56
  • 8
    DrJokepu - I think florin meant to say here that the OP asked for a loop-less solution – Eli Bendersky Nov 8 '09 at 5:56

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