48

I have a .Net C# class where I need to make a variable public. I need to initialize this variable within a method (not within the constructor). However, I don't want the variable to be modifieable by other classes. Is this possible?

1
  • 7
    And the award for quickest question to 5 answers goes to...
    – 3Dave
    Jan 11, 2011 at 20:22

9 Answers 9

92

Don't use a field - use a property:

class Foo
{
    public string Bar { get; private set; }
}

In this example Foo.Bar is readable everywhere and writable only by members of Foo itself.

As a side note, this example is using a C# feature introduced in version 3 called automatically implemented properties. This is syntactical sugar that the compiler will transform into a regular property that has a private backing field like this:

class Foo
{
    [CompilerGenerated]
    private string <Bar>k__BackingField;

    public string Bar
    {
        [CompilerGenerated]
        get
        {
            return this.<Bar>k__BackingField;
        }
        [CompilerGenerated]
        private set
        {
            this.<Bar>k__BackingField = value;
        }
    }
}
2
  • 4
    But what if it is a reference type instead of a value type? Couldn't another class read the reference and then modify properties of the object that it points to?
    – JoeMjr2
    Mar 14, 2016 at 19:42
  • They can. For instance even in this case List's Add can be called, if List is a member. I had to deal with it with List (of course it is only one use-case of a reference) and ended-up doing ReadOnlyCollection member with getter only and private variable - a list.
    – Do-do-new
    Nov 5, 2018 at 16:12
12
public class Foo
{
  public string Bar { get; private set; } 
}
7

You have to use a property for this. If you are fine with an automatic getter/setter implementation, this will work:

public string SomeProperty { get; private set; }

Note that you should not expose fields as public anyway, except in some limited circumstances. Use a property instead.

0
5

Sure. Make it a property, and make the setter private:

public Int32 SomeVariable { get; private set; }

Then to set it (from within some method in the class):

SomeVariable = 5;
3

Use a private variable and expose a public property.

class Person
{
  private string name;

  public string Name
  {
    get
    {
      return name;
    }
  }
}
0
2

Are you not allowed to use a property for this? If you are:

private string _variable
public string Variable {
    get {
        return _variable;
    }
}
2

The answers so far work good as long as you dont use reference types. Otherwise you will still be able to manipulate the internals of that variable. e.g:

using System;
namespace Playground
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var fo = new Fo();
            fo.Init();
            Console.WriteLine(fo.SomeBar.SomeValue);
            fo.SomeBar.SomeValue = "Changed it!";
            Console.WriteLine(fo.SomeBar.SomeValue);
            Console.Read();
        }
        public class Fo
        {
            public Bar SomeBar { get; private set; }
            public void Init()
            {
                SomeBar = new Bar{SomeValue = "Hello World!"};
            }
        }
        public class Bar
        {
            public String SomeValue { get; set; }
        }
    }
}
This will result in the console output:

Hello World!
Changed it!

Which may be exactly what you want as you wont be able to change SomeBar but if you want to make the internals of the variable unmodifiable you need to pass back a copy of the variable, e.g.:


using System;
namespace Playground
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var fo = new Fo();
            fo.Init();
            Console.WriteLine(fo.SomeBar.SomeValue);
            fo.SomeBar.SomeValue = "Changed it!";
            Console.WriteLine(fo.SomeBar.SomeValue);
            Console.Read();
        }
        public class Fo
        {
            private Bar _someHiddenBar;
            public Bar SomeBar => new Bar(_someHiddenBar);
            public void Init()
            {
                _someHiddenBar = new Bar{SomeValue = "Hello World!"};
            }
        }
        public class Bar
        {
            public String SomeValue { get; set; }
            public Bar(){}
            public Bar(Bar previousBar)
            {
                SomeValue = previousBar.SomeValue;
            }
        }
    }
}
which will result in the output:

Hello World!
Hello World!

See comments for why I added the third example:


using System;
namespace Playground
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var fo = new Fo();
            fo.Init();
            Console.WriteLine(fo.SomeBar.SomeValue);
            //compile error
            fo.SomeBar.SomeValue = "Changed it!";
            Console.WriteLine(fo.SomeBar.SomeValue);
            Console.Read();
        }
        public class Fo
        {
            private Bar _someHiddenBar;
            public Bar SomeBar => new Bar(_someHiddenBar);
            public void Init()
            {
                _someHiddenBar = new Bar("Hello World!");
            }
        }
        public class Bar
        {
            public String SomeValue { get; }
            public Bar(string someValue)
            {
                SomeValue = someValue;
            }
            public Bar(Bar previousBar)
            {
                SomeValue = previousBar.SomeValue;
            }
        }
    }
}

6
  • This doesn't look good. You're calling fo.SomeBar.SomeValue = "Changed it!"; which does not do the assignment nor does it exception. If this was real code, it'd be a nightmare to debug. You should make things immutable so that you can't even compile or you should throw an exception.
    – rbm
    Aug 8, 2017 at 8:18
  • This is a good point. How would you change it, so that SomeValue can still be changed by his owner but not by reference?
    – kkCosmo
    Aug 8, 2017 at 8:32
  • Look at the other answers, private set; is the most common way. Your example has effectively two classes, so you'd need to control the Fo.Bar and the Bar.SomeValue and make them immutable.
    – rbm
    Aug 8, 2017 at 8:39
  • But that is beside the point. JoeMjr2 pointed out (in the comment of the top answer) that that works for value types, but that you still could modify the variables of a reference type. Hence my example with two classes. Making SomeValue private would not allow Fo the modification MikeTWebb asked for.
    – kkCosmo
    Aug 8, 2017 at 8:45
  • 1
    Not if you make the class immutable, i.e. set the values in constructor.
    – rbm
    Aug 8, 2017 at 8:47
2

Necro for sure, but this bares mentioning with the improvements to the language in 6.0

class Foo {

    // The new assignment constructor is wonderful shorthand ensuring
    // that the var is only writable inside the obj's constructor
    public string Bar { get; private set; } = String.Empty;

    }
1
  • This won't work inside a method because it will be a read-only property.
    – usefulBee
    May 23, 2017 at 15:32
-1

Define it as private? Is that what you asking for, you can modify it any where inside the container class but you can't out side it

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