1

I cannot believe there is no smart way to get something like this from a 2D array,
in this case int[,] a:

"{1,2,3},{4,5,6},{7,8,9}"

I have read many similar questions and learned that string.Join() can only be used on jagged arrays (in 2D). But I don't want to use them because of the more complex initialization and because it just feels bad when my rows, which all have the same length, are spread over several places in memory.

This is my "normal" code:

var s = "";
for (int i = 0; i < a.GetLength(0); i++) {
    if (i > 0) s += ',';
    s += '{';
    for (int j = 0; j < a.GetLength(1); j++) {
        if (j > 0) s += ',';
        s += a[i, j];
    }
    s += '}';
}

And here a "golfed" one:

var s = "{";
var i = 0;
foreach (var item in a) s += (i++ > 0 ? i % a.GetLength(1) == 1 ? "},{" : "," : "") + item;
s += '}';

:) - not really elegant, too, and the readability is more than bad.

Any suggestions? I'm open to Linq, since it doesn't have to be fast. I'm interested in improving elegance of the code, but not by just moving it to an extension method.

2

Linq solution, not performance wise.

var str = string.Join(",", a.OfType<int>()
    .Select((value, index) => new {value, index})
    .GroupBy(x => x.index / a.GetLength(1))
    .Select(x => $"{{{string.Join(",", x.Select(y => y.value))}}}"));

Note that you cant Select on 2d array, but you can use OfType which will return an enumerable for 2d array, the enumerator will traverse through 2d array horizontally.

x.index / a.GetLength(1) simply divides each index to total number of rows. so if you have 3 rows, your indexes will be distributed through 3 rows equivalently.

lastly string join is operated on each group.


A little more simplified version. (format inside result selector of grouping)

var str = string.Join(",", a.OfType<int>()
    .Select((value, index) => new {value, index})
    .GroupBy(x => x.index / a.GetLength(1), x => x.value,
        (i, ints) => $"{{{string.Join(",", ints)}}}"));
  • Short but not elegant. – apocalypse Oct 8 '17 at 12:30
  • define elegant. certainly its better than obfuscated code golf solution or plain for loops. @apocalypse although that's opinion based. – M.kazem Akhgary Oct 8 '17 at 12:32
  • 3
    @apocalypse yes, that will have much better performance, it can be even optimized further using StringBuilder. but there is a tradeoff between readability and performance. – M.kazem Akhgary Oct 8 '17 at 13:36
  • 1
    again that is opinion based, someone might find piece of code hard to read, but someone else will find it trivial. linq is more declarative, but plain for loops are more imperative. a good explanation here stackoverflow.com/questions/1784664/… @apocalypse – M.kazem Akhgary Oct 8 '17 at 17:15
  • 1
    Linq is already written, im not reinventing the wheel. Im using already existing library and dont write extension method my self. You can print hello world in one line using Console.WriteLine. Would you says its one linear or its thousands of lines that you dont see? Certainly you didnt implement WriteLine method, so thats one line written by you. Same story about Linq @apocalypse – M.kazem Akhgary Oct 8 '17 at 18:04
3

AFAIK, when we want a string from an object, we are calling about serializing, So I prefer to use a serializer like Newtonsoft.Json:

var result = $@"{{{JsonConvert.SerializeObject(a)
    .Trim('[', ']').Replace("[", "{").Replace("]", "}")}}}";

A way by using simple fors like your solution and with removing ifs can be - this code will be faster for small arrays -:

var result = string.Empty;
var maxI = a.GetLength(0);
var maxJ = a.GetLength(1);
for (var i = 0; i < maxI; i++)
{
    result += ",{";
    for (var j = 0; j < maxJ; j++)
    {
        result += $"{a[i, j]},";
    }

    result += "}";
}

result = .Replace(",}", "}").Substring(1);

As suggested to use StringBuilder to improve performance just for big arrays:

var sb = new StringBuilder(string.Empty);
var maxI = a.GetLength(0);
var maxJ = a.GetLength(1);
for (var i = 0; i < maxI; i++)
{
    sb.Append(",{");
    for (var j = 0; j < maxJ; j++)
    {
        sb.Append($"{a[i, j]},");
    }

    sb.Append("}");
}

sb.Replace(",}", "}").Remove(0, 1);
var result = sb.ToString();
  • 1
    Would changing result to StringBuilder improve performance for large arrays? – mjwills Oct 8 '17 at 22:27
  • Yes, but since it lowers elegance, I wouldn't do that in my case. – maf-soft Oct 9 '17 at 6:54
  • 1
    @maf-soft: Since when is better performance and readability defined as bad elegance. I would prefer the StringBuilder solution. But this is just my opinion. – Martin Backasch Oct 9 '17 at 9:38
  • 3
  • 1
    @maf-soft In most cases yes. In my eyes the second snippet looks more tidier and coherent as the first one. But as you said, it's totally personal tast. – Martin Backasch Oct 9 '17 at 10:56
1

Consider this approach:

var numbers = new int[,] { { 1, 2, 3 }, { 4, 5, 6 }, { 7, 8, 9 } };

var results = string.Join(",",
    Enumerable.Range(0, numbers.GetUpperBound(0) + 1)
        .Select(x => Enumerable.Range(0, numbers.GetUpperBound(1) + 1)
            .Select(y => numbers[x, y]))
        .Select(z => "{" + string.Join(",", z) + "}"));

Console.WriteLine(results);

Console.ReadLine();

It is quite similar to yours, but using LINQ instead. It projects the two dimensional array into a LINQ enumerable, and then wraps it with braces and adds commas where needed.

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