51

I want to be able to make readonly properties (not getters) for users of my class, but I need to update them internally; is there a way to do this and allow to be changed internally? (and make sure TypeScript blocks most attempts to change the value)

(In my case it's a game engine and getters/setters [functions in general] are a bad option)

6
  • 1
    See also: stackoverflow.com/q/46400536/3786294
    – Paleo
    Oct 8, 2017 at 20:00
  • 2
    That post only talks about the semantics of readonly, not how to change it. One post did mention Object.assign(foo, { value: 4 }); but it is hardly the best way! Oct 9, 2017 at 3:19
  • The second usage in the question is an example of how to update a readonly property.
    – Paleo
    Oct 9, 2017 at 7:15
  • That is for objects, not classes, and is not much better than a getter on an object, except it completely hides the value using closures. Oct 10, 2017 at 17:05
  • Aside from the question, a game engine sounds cool! Is it open source? Got a link?
    – trusktr
    Mar 20, 2020 at 1:58

5 Answers 5

37

You could make use of the improved mapped type modifiers since Typescript 2.8.

For example, let's say that UI layer (and all others except persistence layer) shall only get a readonly version of your domain entity. Persistence layer is a special case, since it somehow must know how to copy all internals into the database. In order to do so, we don't want to make defensive copies everytime and just use the readonly typescript modifier for that purpose.

Your readonly entity would be:

class Immutable {
    constructor(
        public readonly myProp: string ) {}
}

The mutable type of your entity:

type Mutable = {
     -readonly [K in keyof Immutable]: Immutable[K] 
}

Note the special -readonly syntax to remove the flag (also works with optionals).

In one limited place (here the persistence layer) we can convert Immutable to Mutable by doing:

let imm = new Immutable("I'm save here")
imm.myProp = "nono doesnt work. and thats good" // error
let mut: Mutable = imm  // you could also "hard" cast here: imm as unknown as Mutable
mut.myProp = "there we go" // imm.myProp value is "there we go"

Hope that helps.

3
  • 2
    But, we don't want people to change the mutability of the properties on the outside of the class. That defeats the purpose.
    – trusktr
    Mar 20, 2020 at 2:02
  • 3
    Some programming languages apply a "cooperative consenting adults" approach; the language features make it clear that cooperative programmers shouldn't do something, but won't stop them from bypassing it when they seem to think to know what they're doing, since the only feet they can shoot into are their own. Oct 23, 2022 at 11:30
  • I agree, this is not much different then the old days where someone might cast a struct over some memory block to a known object layout and override the private/readonly properties. While you can do it, you normally shouldn't and take a great risk. If someone wants to do it, it's up to them to have a good reason to do so. Sep 7, 2023 at 20:32
26

There are actually 3 ways I know of. If you have a class like this:

class GraphNode {
    readonly _parent: GraphNode;
    add(newNode: GraphNode) { /* ...etc... */ }
}
var node = new GraphNode();

In the add() function you could do either:

  1. newNode[<any>'_parent'] = this; - Works, but BAD IDEA. Refactoring will break this.

    Update: Seems newNode['_parent'] = this; will work just fine now without <any> in newer versions of TypeScript, but refactoring will still break it.

  2. (<{_parent: GraphNode}>newNode)._parent = this; - Better than 1 (not the best), and although refactoring breaks it, at least the compiler will tell you this time (since the type conversion will fail).
  3. BEST: Create an INTERNAL interface (used by yourself only):

    interface IGraphObjectInternal { _parent: GraphNode; }
    class GraphNode implements IGraphObjectInternal {
        readonly _parent: GraphNode;
        add(newNode: GraphNode) { /* ...etc... */ }
    }
    

    Now you can just do (<IGraphObjectInternal>newNode)._parent = this; and refactoring will also work. The only caveat is that if you export your class from a namespace (the only reason to use an internal interface IMO) you'll have to export the interface as well. For this reason, I sometimes will use #2 to completely lock down internals where there's only one place using it (and not advertise to the world), but usually #3 if I need to have many properties to work with referenced in many other locations (in case I need to refactor things).

You may notice I didn't talk about getters/setters. While it is possible to use only a getter and no setter, then update a private variable, TypeScript does not protect you! I can easily do object['_privateOrProtectedMember'] = whatever and it will work. It does not work for the readonly modifier (which was in the question). Using the readonly modifier better locks down my properties (as far as working within the TypeScript compiler is concerned), and because JavaScript doesn't have a readonly modifier, I can use various methods to update them with workarounds on the JavaScript side (i.e. at runtime). ;)

Warning: As I said, this only works within TypeScript. In JavaScript people can still modify your properties (unless you use getters only with non-exposed properties).

Update

Since typescript 2.8 you can now remove the readonly modifiers:

type Writeable<T> = { -readonly [P in keyof T]: T[P] };

and also the optional modifier:

type Writeable<T> = { -readonly [P in keyof T]-?: T[P] };

More here: Improved control over mapped type modifiers

5
  • Unfortunately the writable method does not work on a private property (it's not in the class interface). Sep 23, 2021 at 6:05
  • So what? The question was about readonly properties, not private ones. For private access I did show above you can use brackets. Sep 23, 2021 at 8:33
  • Right. I only pointed it out for future readers. I did not mean to imply that your answer was incorrect. Sep 23, 2021 at 10:01
  • Ah ok, I see. :) Sep 23, 2021 at 10:16
  • 1
    Deeply nested variant: type Writeable<T> = { -readonly [P in keyof T]: T[P] extends object ? Writeable<T[P]> : T[P] };
    – Hayden
    Aug 21, 2023 at 23:23
18

My current solution for TypeScript 3.6.3

type Mutable<T> = {
   -readonly [k in keyof T]: T[k];
};

class Item {
  readonly id: string;

  changeId(newId: string) {
    const mutableThis = this as Mutable<Item>;
    mutableThis.id = newId;
  }
}
0
7

The answer posted by OP here is the best answer, not this one. Which is just to use an interface and not export it.

interface IGraphObjectInternal { _parent: GraphNode; }
export class GraphNode implements IGraphObjectInternal {
  // tslint:disable-next-line:variable-name
  // tslint:disable-next-line:member-access
  // tslint:disable-next-line:variable-name
  public readonly _parent: GraphNode;
  public add(newNode: GraphNode) {
    (newNode as IGraphObjectInternal)._parent = this;
  }
}

I tried this earlier and had some problem (not sure why, but tried again now and it works just fine.

Leaving the answer here just for the fun of playing with it.

TypeScript provides readonly keyword which allows setting value on initialization or in constructor only.

If you want to change the value any time, then what you need is a read-only property, which is known as a "get" property.

Example:

class MyClass { 
  private _myValue: WhateverTypeYouWant;

  get myValue() {
    return this._myValue;
  }

  doSomething(inputValue: WhateverTypeYouWant) {
    // Do checks or anything you want.
    this._myValue = inputValue; // Or anything else you decide
  }
}

It's worth mentioning that users may still be able to call myObject['_myValue'] and access the property. TypeScript will not tell them about it in intellisense though, and if they do use your code this way, they are using your library in an unsupported way and shooting themselves in the foot (note that this is client-side code anyway, so the code is available to read).

Check the official documentation on how this works.


Update

If you really want to use readonly and force it to work, you can do it like this:

class Test {
    readonly value = "not changed";

    changeValue() { 
        this["value" as any] = "change from inside";
    }
}

But as I mentioned in my comment on this answer, and I show in the runnable version of this example, the semantics are the same in the sense that both private and readonly can be changed from outside if the users really want to.


Update 2

In further comments you bring an interesting scenario, game development, where function call is considered expensive. I cannot validate how expensive property access might be (Which is the recommended path for this generally), but here's the answer I think you are looking for:

If you really really want to do set the readonly member, and just want to make sure you have refactoring support, change this["value" as any] = to (this.value as Test['value']) = (where Test here is the class name, and value is the property name).

class Test {
    // We had to set the type explicitly for this to work
    // Because due to initial `= "not changed"`
    //  `value` property has type `"not changed"` not `string`
    readonly value: string = "not changed";

    changeValue() { 
        (this.value as Test['value']) = "change from inside";
        alert(this.value);
    }
}

const test = new Test();

test.changeValue();

(test.value as Test['value']) = 'change from outside';
alert(test.value);

Runnable Example


Update 3

Although the syntax (this.value as Test['value']) = works in official TypeScript playground, as proven by the link at the end of Update 2 in this answer, it doesn't work in VS Code (and maybe other TS environments).

You need to change it to this['value' as Test['value']] = (where, again, Test is a class name and value is a property name).

The working code becomes:

class Test {
  // We had to set the type explicitly for this to work
  // Because due to initial `= "not changed"`
  //  `value` property has type `"not changed"` not `string`
  readonly value: string = "not changed";

  changeValue() {
    this['value' as Test['value']] = "change from inside";
    alert(this.value);
  }
}

const test = new Test();

test.changeValue();

test['value' as Test['value']] = 'change from outside';
alert(test.value);

Runnable Example

Limited Refactoring

Since refactoring is the reason for asking the question I have to mention that besides being ugly, the workaround here offers only limited refactoring support.

That means, if you misspell property name (value in the sample) in any part of the assignment this['value' as Test['value']] = ..., TypeScript will give you a compile time error.

The problem though is, at least in VS Code in my quick test, when you rename the property (from value in the sample to anything else), TypeScript / VS Code doesn't update the references to it that are implemented using this workaround.

It still gives you a compile time error, which is better than leaving invalid code without errors, but you'd want it to rename the property for you too.

Luckily having to do this with a string replace (of ['value' as Test['value']] in the sample) seems to be generally safe from false matches, but still, it's silly, and less than desired, but I think this is as far as this gets.

20
  • 1
    I added Update 3 about using this in VS Code and about refactoring support.
    – Meligy
    Oct 11, 2017 at 0:47
  • 2
    It is the same as (<{_parent: GraphNode}>newNode)._parent = this;. If I change _parent: GraphNode it also fails. You're just doing the same thing a different way. ;) Also in both cases the compiler will catch it (give an error) if it gets refactored. Oct 11, 2017 at 0:58
  • 1
    The only errors I saw were unrelated tslint errors on _parent property, disabled as follows: // tslint:disable-next-line:variable-name, // tslint:disable-next-line:member-access, and // tslint:disable-next-line:variable-name
    – Meligy
    Oct 11, 2017 at 3:24
  • 1
    The member-access tslint error is not related, it's just that default tslint asks for explicitly mentioning public or private.
    – Meligy
    Oct 11, 2017 at 3:26
  • 1
    I have a .Net Core project and TS 2.5 and a private interface for a public class doesn't work in VS 2017 (at least not yet, I'll keep an eye on it). Oct 11, 2017 at 17:59
7

Here's the solution I like best (using a tip courtesy of James Wilkins). My thought is that write access should be only allowed within the class, hence making the getter private.

type Writable<T> = { -readonly [K in keyof T]: T[K] }; 

class TestModel {
  readonly val: number;

  setVal(value: number) {
    this.asWriteable.val = value;
  }

  // use this.asWriteable.* to write to readonly fields
  private get asWriteable(): Writable<TestModel> {
    return this as Writable<TestModel>;
  }
}
3
  • 2
    While it works, I would not recommend it. It breaks any ability to refactor your code. There is already a supported solution that works better: class TestModel { readonly val: number; setVal(value: number) { (<Writeable<TestModel>>this).val = value; } } Aug 14, 2019 at 3:28
  • Thanks for the tip. For whatever reason that didn't compile and I didn't see an import for Writeable (except an unrelated stream class), but this works: ` type Writable<T> = { -readonly [K in keyof T]: T[K] }; type WriteableTestModel = Writable<TestModel>; class TestModel { readonly val: number; setVal(value: number) { (this as WriteableTestModel).val = value; code Aug 14, 2019 at 16:30
  • 1
    Sorry, I forgot it may not be included by default. It was in the docs here: typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/release-notes/… (they really should think about adding it, if not done so already) Aug 14, 2019 at 22:52

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.