I have:

trait Pet[T <: Pet[T]] {    //disallows: Dog extends Pet[String]
  self: T =>                //disallows: Dog extends Pet[Monkey]
  def rename(s: String): T
  def name: String
}

Now a trait like Feline that would extend the Pet class can be easily added as follows:

trait Feline[T <: Feline[T]] extends Pet[T] {
  self: T =>
  def pur : Unit = println("purrrr")
  def scratch: Unit
}

But if I were to introduce a type mixing in Pet with a self-type such as:

trait PetCareInfo[T <: PetCareInfo[T]] {
    self: T with Pet[T] =>
    def registerPet: Unit
  }

I get the error:

type arguments [T] do not conform to trait Pet's type parameter bounds [T <: Pet[T]]

my understanding is that this is because self-type check in PetCareInfo looks at the types A with B individually and as such fails the restriction. (not sure if this is a bug or feature)

I can use existential types instead:

type TypeRestriction: Pet[A] forSome {type A}

trait PetCareInfo[T <: PetCareInfo[T]] {
    self: T with TypeRestriction => //mix-in restriction
    def registerPet: Unit
  }

and that would kinda work. Two questions:

  1. I cannot directly define the the existential type at the mix-in restriction line. I get:

; expected but 'forSome' found.

Is there a way of getting around this?

  1. In practice the PetCareInfo's forSome restriction + Pet's own restriction means that I can not have:

    class Cat extends Pet[Dog] with PetCareInfo[Cat]

But I would like to know if there is a way of not depending on Pet for this.

Update:

For question 2, I can change the existing type restriction to be:

type Restriction[T] = A with Pet[A] forSome {type A <: PetCareInfo[T]}

trait PetCareInfo[T <: PetCareInfo[T]] {
  self: Restriction[T] =>
  def registerPet: Unit
}

and that seems to be solving the problem. Although, there is still no guarantee that the structural A type will be the same as T, so we are still depending on Pet. :(

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this:

trait PetCareInfo[T <: Pet[T] with PetCareInfo[T]] {
  self: T =>
  def registerPet: Unit
}

abstract class Cat extends Feline[Cat] with PetCareInfo[Cat] // OK
abstract class Dog extends Pet[Dog] with PetCareInfo[Dog] // OK
abstract class Tiger extends Feline[Tiger] with PetCareInfo[Cat] // Error.

Update: The above demonstrates an is a relationship. That is, Cat both is a Feline and is a PetCareInfo. Here's an alternative that makes PetCareInfo a member of Pet, so that a Cat has a PetCareInfo. (I'm assuming that this makes sense. You could equally have a Pet member of PetCareInfo if that's more appropriate.)

// Change of emphasis: T is type of Pet. OK since we're in charge of its definition.
trait PetCareInfo[T <: Pet[T]] {
  // Etc.
}

trait Pet[T <: Pet[T]] {
  // Etc.
  val info: PetCareInfo[T]
}

abstract class Dog extends Pet[Dog] {
  // Etc.
  override val info = new PetCareInfo[Dog] {
     // Define a what a PetCareInfo looks like for a dog.
  }
}

This latter approach could also be used to hide PetCareInfo (if the info member was private), in the event that such details are not useful to the code user.

UPDATE 2: BTW, regarding the error "type arguments [T] do not conform to trait Pet's type parameter bounds [T <: Pet[T]]" for:

trait PetCareInfo[T <: PetCareInfo[T]] {
  self: T with Pet[T] => // <- Error
  def registerPet: Unit
}

the message is self-explanatory: Pet's T must be derived from Pet[T]; however, you have only defined a T for PetCareInfo to be derived from PetCareInfo[T], and a PetCareInfo[T] has no expressed relationship to a Pet[T]. The self declaration simply constrains the type of any concrete PetCareInfo instance, and cannot be used to change the definition of what a T represents.

That is, T must be derived from PetCareInfo[T] and self must belong to an object that extends T with a Pet[T]. However, since T is not derived from Pet[T], it's impossible to create such an instance, hence the error. So, it's not a bug but an essential type check.

  • Nice, I forgot that we could restrict the parameterisation type too! :) yeah that would do. So, let's step back for a second. Check out my update. How do these structures compare in terms of is-a and has-a relationships? – ShS Oct 9 '17 at 12:12
  • If you're trying to mixin capabilities, then this will be an is a relationship. You could achieve a has a relationship by, for example, creating an overridable PetCareInfo member of Pet, so that concrete Pets had to create a suitable PetCareInfo member. Your update is just another way of expressing the relationship that PetCareInfo instances need to mixin a Pet (albeit the other way around compared to my example: PetCareInfo with Pet, instead of Pet with PetCareInfo. Dotty (aka Scala 3) would make that ordering redundant, by allowing Pet & PetCareInfo. – Mike Allen Oct 9 '17 at 12:23
  • 1
    It can't be the same T, unless you declare T as I did to be derived from both traits. Your Restriction[T] adds a new type A and requires that A be derived from both traits. So they're equivalent in terms of creating a concrete PetCareInfo instance - the concrete class must still extend both traits. However, by declaring T to be derived only from PetCareInfo[T], you're not being up-front about that requirement. – Mike Allen Oct 9 '17 at 13:44
  • 2
    You've expressed a desire to declare PetCareInfo[T] without being dependent upon Pet. However, you also seem to want to make your implementation of PetCareInfo[T] dependent upon Pet. So either implement PetCareInfo so that it doesn't depend upon Pet, or accept that the dependency does, in fact, exist. – Mike Allen Oct 9 '17 at 14:24
  • 1
    So, by the sound of it, PetCareInfo doesn't access Pet in any way shape or form, isn't dependent upon Pet and PetCareInfo.self is only dependent upon itself. So why the complexity of using existential types and insisting upon self being dervived from Pet? BTW, I didn't downvote your question. ;-) – Mike Allen Oct 9 '17 at 15:00

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.