2

It looks like today you no longer to have to encode spaces by %20 in your html links or image links. For example, suppose you have this image at 〔http://example.com/i/my house.jpg〕. Notice the space there. In your html code, you can just do this:

<img src="http://example.com/i/my house.jpg" alt="my house">

It work in all current version of browsers. Though, what i'm not sure is that whether the browser encodes it before requesting the url, or a particular server will do the right with with paths with space? (apache)

Addendum: sorry about the confusion. My real question is about HTTP protocol. I'll leave this one as is and mark Answered. I posted a new question here. does HTTP protocol require space be encoded in file path?

  • PS i know that percent encoding is required in URL. Anyway, am wondering now if http protocol requires encoding for the space char when used in file path for the GET header line. (tried to test with telnet... but i forgot what other header are necessary so i aborted the test) – Xah Lee Jan 12 '11 at 5:52
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The browser makes the correction.

You still have to encode the spaces though. Just because it works in the browsers you use doesn't make it valid, and doesn't mean it will work everywhere.

You can see a list of reserved characters and other characters that should be encoded here: http://www.blooberry.com/indexdot/html/topics/urlencoding.htm

RFC1738 specifically states:

Thus, only alphanumerics, the special characters "$-_.+!*'(),", and reserved characters used for their reserved purposes may be used unencoded within a URL.

RFC2396 takes place over RFC1738 and expounds on space usage in URLs:

The space character is excluded because significant spaces may disappear and insignificant spaces may be introduced when URI are transcribed or typeset or subjected to the treatment of word- processing programs. Whitespace is also used to delimit URI in many contexts.

  • does http protocol requires encoding of space in file names? e.g. in "GET /some thing.html HTTP/1.1" – Xah Lee Jan 12 '11 at 5:41
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    @Xah Lee: HTTP doesn't know anything about file names, it only knows about URLs. /some thing.html may be (part of) a file name on the server but that's an implementation detail, HTTP just sees a URL that has a space in it. The %20 (encoded space character) might have been decoded before the web server logged that though. – mu is too short Jan 12 '11 at 6:43
  • @Xah Lee, I think the RFC is pretty clear. RFC2616 specifically references RFC2396 for URI formatting. RFC2396 takes place of RFC1738, which I have reference in my answer. Part 2.4.3 of RFC2396 (rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc2396.txt) says that "The space character is excluded because significant spaces may disappear and insignificant spaces may be introduced when URI are transcribed or typeset or subjected to the treatment of word-processing programs. Whitespace is also used to delimit URI in many contexts." So, yes the encoding of space is required. – Brad Jan 12 '11 at 15:19
  • @Brad. Thanks for the well informed answer. I posted a new question here. stackoverflow.com/questions/4673809/… – Xah Lee Jan 12 '11 at 20:45
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    @Xah Lee, how did I not already answer your question? How many ways can I answer YES it is required. – Brad Jan 12 '11 at 20:49

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