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I have got quite a good experience with C programming and I am used to think in terms of pointers, so I can get good performance when dealing with huge amount of datas. It is not the same with R, which I am still learning.

I have got a file with approximately 1 million lines, separated by a '\n' and each line has got 1, 2 or more integers inside, separated by a ' '. I have been able to put together a code which reads the file and put everything into a list of lists. Some lines can be empty. I would then like to put the first number of each line, if it exists, into a separated list, just passing over if a line is empty, and the remaining numbers into a second list.

The code I post here is terribly slow (it has been still running since I started wrote this question so now I killed R), how can I get a decent speed? In C this would be done instantly.

graph <- function() {
    x <- scan("result", what="", sep="\n")
    y <- strsplit(x, "[[:space:]]+") #use spaces for split number in each line
    y <- lapply(y, FUN = as.integer) #convert from a list of lists of characters to a list of lists of integers
    print("here we go")
    first <- c()
    others <- c()
    for(i in 1:length(y)) {
        if(length(y[i]) >= 1) { 
            first[i] <- y[i][1]
        }
        k <- 2;
        for(j in 2:length(y[i])) {
            others[k] <- y[i][k]
            k <- k + 1
        }
    }

In a previous version of the code, in which each line had at least one number and in which I was interested only in the first number of each line, I used this code (I read everywhere that I should avoid using for loops in languages like R)

yy <- rapply(y, function(x) head(x,1))

which takes about 5 second, so far far better than above but still annoying if compared to C.

EDIT this is an example of the first 10 lines of my file:

42 7 31 3 
23 1 34 5 


1 
-23 -34 2 2 

42 7 31 3 31 4 

1
  • Is your file a CSV? Also, could you share examples of your 'numbers', please? Perhaps you could say which of these might be a number in your file: "1 2", "1 23", "1 2 3". – PDE Oct 10 '17 at 14:53
  • @PDE No it is just of the format described above. I generate the file myself using a C program. If you prefer I can create a CSV file but I would like to learn the code fro my very problem. All the numbers you wrote are valid, to be precise, in my case I have always numbers from -74 to 50 and I do not have more than 6 numbers in each line. I do not use a binary format because I want to easily go trough the data with emacs – Nisba Oct 10 '17 at 14:56
  • The loop is the only slow part ? – Moody_Mudskipper Oct 10 '17 at 14:59
  • @Moody_Mudskipper yes – Nisba Oct 10 '17 at 15:00
  • 1
    @Nisba You could also try the approach in this StackOverflow list: stackoverflow.com/questions/8299978/… – PDE Oct 10 '17 at 15:46
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Base R versus purrr

your_list <- rep(list(list(1,2,3,4), list(5,6,7), list(8,9)), 100)

microbenchmark::microbenchmark(
  your_list %>% map(1),
  lapply(your_list, function(x) x[[1]])
)
Unit: microseconds
                                  expr       min        lq       mean    median         uq       max neval
                  your_list %>% map(1) 22671.198 23971.213 24801.5961 24775.258 25460.4430 28622.492   100
 lapply(your_list, function(x) x[[1]])   143.692   156.273   178.4826   162.233   172.1655  1089.939   100

microbenchmark::microbenchmark(
  your_list %>% map(. %>% .[-1]),
  lapply(your_list, function(x) x[-1])
)
Unit: microseconds
                                 expr     min       lq      mean   median       uq      max neval
       your_list %>% map(. %>% .[-1]) 916.118 942.4405 1019.0138 967.4370 997.2350 2840.066   100
 lapply(your_list, function(x) x[-1]) 202.956 219.3455  264.3368 227.9535 243.8455 1831.244   100

purrr isn't a package for performance, just convenience, which is great but not when you care a lot about performance. This has been discussed elsewhere.


By the way, if you are good in C, you should look at package Rcpp.

  • You're looping on 4 elements only though, so the overhead costs are amplified. OP can you confirm the base solutions were faster on your full data and to which extent ? – Moody_Mudskipper Oct 12 '17 at 20:08
  • Also your comparison is fair to test my solution against the base solution, but unfair to map because there's also an overhead due to the pipes (2 of them), and possibly the evaluation of the dot. – Moody_Mudskipper Oct 12 '17 at 20:12
  • @Moody_Mudskipper I'm looping on 300 elements. You may increase the size if you want. – F. Privé Oct 13 '17 at 6:50
  • Sorry I had misread it – Moody_Mudskipper Oct 13 '17 at 18:38
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try this:

your_list <- list(list(1,2,3,4),
     list(5,6,7),
     list(8,9))

library(purrr)

first <- your_list %>% map(1)
# [[1]]
# [1] 1
# 
# [[2]]
# [1] 5
# 
# [[3]]
# [1] 8

other <- your_list %>% map(. %>% .[-1])    
# [[1]]
# [[1]][[1]]
# [1] 2
# 
# [[1]][[2]]
# [1] 3
# 
# [[1]][[3]]
# [1] 4
# 
# 
# [[2]]
# [[2]][[1]]
# [1] 6
# 
# [[2]][[2]]
# [1] 7
# 
# 
# [[3]]
# [[3]][[1]]
# [1] 9

Though you might want the following, as it seems to me those numbers would be better stored in vectors than in lists:

your_list %>% map(1) %>% unlist # as it seems map_dbl was slow
# [1] 1 5 8
your_list %>% map(~unlist(.x[-1]))
# [[1]]
# [1] 2 3 4
# 
# [[2]]
# [1] 6 7
# 
# [[3]]
# [1] 9
  • @Nisba this isn't what you want ? – Moody_Mudskipper Oct 10 '17 at 15:21
  • I am reading it right now, it seems exactly what I am looking for, I will try the solution in minutes. You are right using vector is more suitable for my purpose. – Nisba Oct 10 '17 at 15:25
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    @Moody_Mudskipper Simply using lapply(your_list, function(x) x[[1]]) should be faster – F. Privé Oct 10 '17 at 16:06
  • Apparently they don't differ much: groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/davis-rug/DIofOdFZgHI – Moody_Mudskipper Oct 10 '17 at 16:18
  • this is the best solution so far, your_list %>% map(. %>% .[-1] %>% unlist)) is pretty "fast" (5 seconds), however the fist one map_dbl(1) takes about 1 minute. So so far this is the best solution but it is far from being fast... :( – Nisba Oct 10 '17 at 19:41
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Indeed, coming from C to R will be confusing (it was for me). What helps for performance is understanding that primitive types in R are all vectors implemented in highly optimized, natively-compiled C and Fortran, and you should aim to avoid loops when there's a vectorized solution available.

That said, I think you should load this as a csv via read.csv(). This will provide you with a dataframe with which you can perform vector-based operations.

For a better understanding, a concise (and humorous) read is http://www.burns-stat.com/pages/Tutor/R_inferno.pdf.

  • Thank you I will try. I was looking for something like the book you suggested me, I will read it! – Nisba Oct 10 '17 at 15:18
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I would try to use stringr package. Something like this:

set.seed(3)
d <- replicate(3, sample(1:1000, 3))
d <- apply(d, 2, function(x) paste(c(x, "\n"), collapse = " "))
d
# [1] "169 807 385 \n" "328 602 604 \n" "125 295 577 \n"


require(stringr)
str_split(d, " ", simplify = T)
# [,1]  [,2]  [,3]  [,4]
# [1,] "169" "807" "385" "\n"
# [2,] "328" "602" "604" "\n"
# [3,] "125" "295" "577" "\n"

Even for large data it is fast:

d <- replicate(1e6, sample(1:1000, 3))
d <- apply(d, 2, function(x) paste(c(x, "\n"), collapse = " "))
d
system.time(s <- str_split(d, " ", simplify = T)) #0.77 sek
  • thanks, but what about splitting the each line in two list of numbers? One for the first column and one for the remaining? That is the slow part of my code – Nisba Oct 10 '17 at 15:16
  • why do you need lists? in R lists are mush slower than vectors and matrices. – minem Oct 11 '17 at 5:48
  • That's a good point, in fact using arrays and F. Privé's solution now the code runs decently! – Nisba Oct 12 '17 at 11:45
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Assuming the files are in a CSV, and that all of the 'numbers' are strictly of the form 1 2 or -1 2 (i.e., 1 2 3 or 1 23 are not allowed in the file), then one could start by coding:

# Install package `data.table` if needed
# install.packages('data.table')

# Load `data.table` package
library(data.table)

# Load the CSV, which has just one column named `my_number`.
# Then, coerce `my_number` into character format and remove negative signs.
DT <- fread('file.csv')[, my_number := as.character(abs(my_number))]

# Extract first character, which would be the first desired digit 
# if my assumption about number formats is correct.
DT[, first_column := substr(my_number, 1, 1)]

# The rest of the substring can go into another column.
DT[, second_column := substr(my_number, 2, nchar(my_number))].

Then, if you still really need to create two lists, you could do the following.

# Create the first list.
first_list <- DT[, as.list(first_column)]

# Create the second list.
second_list <- DT[, as.list(second_column)]
  • I think I can support multiple digits number with your solution if I create the file padding the numbers with zero. Anyway my rows are not always of the same length, so I will keep in mind for the future, thank you! – Nisba Oct 10 '17 at 15:14
  • At least given my understanding that all you want is to store the first 'digit' of your 'number' as first_list and the rest of the 'number' as second_list, then my solution does not have a problem with your 'numbers' having different lengths. second_column is generated as the substring of your number starting from the second character (which, as I understand it, is an empty space) to the last character of that 'number' howsoever many characters that 'number' may have. – PDE Oct 10 '17 at 15:19
  • Oh there was a misunderstanding: I need to store every first number and every other number in other list, not digits! – Nisba Oct 10 '17 at 15:21
  • @Nisba As I requested above, an example of what your data looks like would be nice. Currently, I assume your data has just one column per row: my_number "1 2" "1 2 3" "1 23" "-1 2" "-1 23" And I assume you want to generate first_list to look like: "1" "1" "1" "1" "1" .... and so on. And I assume you want to generate second_list would be ok if it says " 2" " 2 3" " 23" " 2" " 23". – PDE Oct 10 '17 at 15:25
  • I edited my question for a better explanation of the format – Nisba Oct 10 '17 at 15:29

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