294

Let's say I have a string 'gfgfdAAA1234ZZZuijjk' and I want to extract just the '1234' part.

I only know what will be the few characters directly before AAA, and after ZZZ the part I am interested in 1234.

With sed it is possible to do something like this with a string:

echo "$STRING" | sed -e "s|.*AAA\(.*\)ZZZ.*|\1|"

And this will give me 1234 as a result.

How to do the same thing in Python?

16 Answers 16

513

Using regular expressions - documentation for further reference

import re

text = 'gfgfdAAA1234ZZZuijjk'

m = re.search('AAA(.+?)ZZZ', text)
if m:
    found = m.group(1)

# found: 1234

or:

import re

text = 'gfgfdAAA1234ZZZuijjk'

try:
    found = re.search('AAA(.+?)ZZZ', text).group(1)
except AttributeError:
    # AAA, ZZZ not found in the original string
    found = '' # apply your error handling

# found: 1234
  • 17
    The second solution is better, if the pattern matches most of the time, because its Easier to ask for forgiveness than permission.. – Bengt Jan 14 '13 at 16:11
  • 6
    Doesn't the indexing start at 0? So you would need to use group(0) instead of group(1)? – Alexander Nov 8 '15 at 22:16
  • 19
    @Alexander, no, group(0) will return full matched string: AAA1234ZZZ, and group(1) will return only characters matched by first group: 1234 – Yurii K Nov 12 '15 at 13:46
  • 1
    @Bengt: Why is that? The first solution looks quite simple to me, and it has fewer lines of code. – HelloGoodbye Jul 7 '16 at 13:21
  • 4
    In this expression the ? modifies the + to be non-greedy, ie. it will match any number of times from 1 upwards but as few as possible, only expanding as necessary. without the ?, the first group would match gfgfAAA2ZZZkeAAA43ZZZonife as 2ZZZkeAAA43, but with the ? it would only match the 2, then searching for multiple (or having it stripped out and search again) would match the 43. – Dom Jul 19 '17 at 8:31
106
>>> s = 'gfgfdAAA1234ZZZuijjk'
>>> start = s.find('AAA') + 3
>>> end = s.find('ZZZ', start)
>>> s[start:end]
'1234'

Then you can use regexps with the re module as well, if you want, but that's not necessary in your case.

  • 9
    The question seems to imply that the input text will always contain both "AAA" and "ZZZ". If this is not the case, your answer fails horribly (by that I mean it returns something completely wrong instead of an empty string or throwing an exception; think "hello there" as input string). – tzot Feb 6 '11 at 23:46
  • @user225312 Is the re method not faster though? – confused00 Jul 21 '16 at 9:25
  • 1
    Voteup, but I would use "x = 'AAA' ; s.find(x) + len(x)" instead of "s.find('AAA') + 3" for maintainability. – Alex Jun 21 '17 at 8:47
  • 1
    If any of the tokens can't be found in the s, s.find will return -1. the slicing operator s[begin:end] will accept it as valid index, and return undesired substring. – ribamar Aug 28 '17 at 15:44
53

regular expression

import re

re.search(r"(?<=AAA).*?(?=ZZZ)", your_text).group(0)

The above as-is will fail with an AttributeError if there are no "AAA" and "ZZZ" in your_text

string methods

your_text.partition("AAA")[2].partition("ZZZ")[0]

The above will return an empty string if either "AAA" or "ZZZ" don't exist in your_text.

PS Python Challenge?

  • 4
    This answer probably deserves more up votes. The string method is the most robust way. It does not need a try/except. – ChaimG Dec 3 '15 at 2:59
  • ... nice, though limited. partition is not regex based, so it only works in this instance because the search string was bounded by fixed literals – GreenAsJade Feb 29 '16 at 2:07
  • Great, many thanks! - this works for strings and does not require regex – Alex Jun 8 '18 at 11:53
14
import re
print re.search('AAA(.*?)ZZZ', 'gfgfdAAA1234ZZZuijjk').group(1)
  • 1
    AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'groups' - if there is no AAA, ZZZ in the string... – eumiro Jan 12 '11 at 9:20
10

Surprised that nobody has mentioned this which is my quick version for one-off scripts:

>>> x = 'gfgfdAAA1234ZZZuijjk'
>>> x.split('AAA')[1].split('ZZZ')[0]
'1234'
  • @user1810100 mentioned essentially that almost exactly 5 years to the day before you posted this... – John Mar 12 at 18:50
9

you can do using just one line of code

>>> import re

>>> re.findall(r'\d{1,5}','gfgfdAAA1234ZZZuijjk')

>>> ['1234']

result will receive list...

7

You can use re module for that:

>>> import re
>>> re.compile(".*AAA(.*)ZZZ.*").match("gfgfdAAA1234ZZZuijjk").groups()
('1234,)
5

With sed it is possible to do something like this with a string:

echo "$STRING" | sed -e "s|.*AAA\(.*\)ZZZ.*|\1|"

And this will give me 1234 as a result.

You could do the same with re.sub function using the same regex.

>>> re.sub(r'.*AAA(.*)ZZZ.*', r'\1', 'gfgfdAAA1234ZZZuijjk')
'1234'

In basic sed, capturing group are represented by \(..\), but in python it was represented by (..).

4

You can find first substring with this function in your code (by character index). Also, you can find what is after a substring.

def FindSubString(strText, strSubString, Offset=None):
    try:
        Start = strText.find(strSubString)
        if Start == -1:
            return -1 # Not Found
        else:
            if Offset == None:
                Result = strText[Start+len(strSubString):]
            elif Offset == 0:
                return Start
            else:
                AfterSubString = Start+len(strSubString)
                Result = strText[AfterSubString:AfterSubString + int(Offset)]
            return Result
    except:
        return -1

# Example:

Text = "Thanks for contributing an answer to Stack Overflow!"
subText = "to"

print("Start of first substring in a text:")
start = FindSubString(Text, subText, 0)
print(start); print("")

print("Exact substring in a text:")
print(Text[start:start+len(subText)]); print("")

print("What is after substring \"%s\"?" %(subText))
print(FindSubString(Text, subText))

# Your answer:

Text = "gfgfdAAA1234ZZZuijjk"
subText1 = "AAA"
subText2 = "ZZZ"

AfterText1 = FindSubString(Text, subText1, 0) + len(subText1)
BeforText2 = FindSubString(Text, subText2, 0) 

print("\nYour answer:\n%s" %(Text[AfterText1:BeforText2]))
4

In python, extracting substring form string can be done using findall method in regular expression (re) module.

>>> import re
>>> s = 'gfgfdAAA1234ZZZuijjk'
>>> ss = re.findall('AAA(.+)ZZZ', s)
>>> print ss
['1234']
3
>>> s = '/tmp/10508.constantstring'
>>> s.split('/tmp/')[1].split('constantstring')[0].strip('.')
2

Just in case somebody will have to do the same thing that I did. I had to extract everything inside parenthesis in a line. For example, if I have a line like 'US president (Barack Obama) met with ...' and I want to get only 'Barack Obama' this is solution:

regex = '.*\((.*?)\).*'
matches = re.search(regex, line)
line = matches.group(1) + '\n'

I.e. you need to block parenthesis with slash \ sign. Though it is a problem about more regular expressions that Python.

Also, in some cases you may see 'r' symbols before regex definition. If there is no r prefix, you need to use escape characters like in C. Here is more discussion on that.

2
text = 'I want to find a string between two substrings'
left = 'find a '
right = 'between two'

print(text[text.index(left)+len(left):text.index(right)])

Gives

string
0

Here's a solution without regex that also accounts for scenarios where the first substring contains the second substring. This function will only find a substring if the second marker is after the first marker.

def find_substring(string, start, end):
    len_until_end_of_first_match = string.find(start) + len(start)
    after_start = string[len_until_end_of_first_match:]
    return string[string.find(start) + len(start):len_until_end_of_first_match + after_start.find(end)]
0

Another way of doing it is using lists (supposing the substring you are looking for is made of numbers, only) :

string = 'gfgfdAAA1234ZZZuijjk'
numbersList = ['0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9']
output = []

for char in string:
    if char in numbersList: output.append(char)

print(f"output: {''.join(output)}")
### output: 1234
-1

One liners that return other string if there was no match. Edit: improved version uses next function, replace "not-found" with something else if needed:

import re
res = next( (m.group(1) for m in [re.search("AAA(.*?)ZZZ", "gfgfdAAA1234ZZZuijjk" ),] if m), "not-found" )

My other method to do this, less optimal, uses regex 2nd time, still didn't found a shorter way:

import re
res = ( ( re.search("AAA(.*?)ZZZ", "gfgfdAAA1234ZZZuijjk") or re.search("()","") ).group(1) )

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