1

I have a web api project based on .net core 2.0.

I followed pretty much the very good example on http://kevinchalet.com/2017/01/30/implementing-simple-token-authentication-in-aspnet-core-with-openiddict/.

The code that returns the SignIn() result for the auth. method looks like so:

if (request.IsPasswordGrantType())
{
    // (...)
    if (useraccount != null && useraccount.Failcount <= AppConstants.AuthMaxAllowedFailedLogin)
    {
        var identity = new ClaimsIdentity(OpenIdConnectServerDefaults.AuthenticationScheme, OpenIdConnectConstants.Claims.Name, OpenIdConnectConstants.Claims.Role);

        identity.AddClaim(OpenIdConnectConstants.Claims.Subject, AppConstants.AuthSubjectClaim, OpenIdConnectConstants.Destinations.AccessToken);
        identity.AddClaim(OpenIdConnectConstants.Claims.Name, useraccount.Username, OpenIdConnectConstants.Destinations.AccessToken);

        return SignIn(new ClaimsPrincipal(identity), OpenIdConnectServerDefaults.AuthenticationScheme);
    }
    // (...)
}

My startup code looks like so:

services.AddDbContext<DbContext>(options =>
{
    options.UseInMemoryDatabase(nameof(DbContext));
    options.UseOpenIddict();
});

services.AddOpenIddict(options =>
{
    options.AddEntityFrameworkCoreStores<DbContext>();
    options.AddMvcBinders();
    options.EnableTokenEndpoint(DcpConstants.ApiTokenRoute);
    options.AllowPasswordFlow();
    options.AllowRefreshTokenFlow();
    options.SetAccessTokenLifetime(TimeSpan.FromHours(1));
    options.SetRefreshTokenLifetime(TimeSpan.FromDays(1));
    options.DisableHttpsRequirement();
});

services.AddAuthentication(options =>
{
    options.DefaultScheme = OAuthValidationDefaults.AuthenticationScheme;
}).AddOAuthValidation();

Now, when I send the post request with the following params:

username: foo@bar.com
password: myPassword
grant_type: password
scope: openid profile offline_access

I only receive scope, token_type, access_token, expires_in and id_token and no refresh_token.

What am I missing?

4

Returning a refresh token with the password is definitely allowed by the OAuth2 specification and thus, fully supported by OpenIddict.

For a refresh token to be returned by OpenIddict, you have to grant the special offline_access scope when calling SignIn. E.g:

if (request.IsPasswordGrantType())
{
    // (...)
    if (useraccount != null && useraccount.Failcount <= AppConstants.AuthMaxAllowedFailedLogin)
    {
        var identity = new ClaimsIdentity(OpenIdConnectServerDefaults.AuthenticationScheme, OpenIdConnectConstants.Claims.Name, OpenIdConnectConstants.Claims.Role);

        identity.AddClaim(OpenIdConnectConstants.Claims.Subject, AppConstants.AuthSubjectClaim, OpenIdConnectConstants.Destinations.AccessToken);
        identity.AddClaim(OpenIdConnectConstants.Claims.Name, useraccount.Username, OpenIdConnectConstants.Destinations.AccessToken);

        var ticket = new AuthenticationTicket(
            new ClaimsPrincipal(identity),
            new AuthenticationProperties(),
            OpenIdConnectServerDefaults.AuthenticationScheme);

        // You have to grant the 'offline_access' scope to allow
        // OpenIddict to return a refresh token to the caller.
        ticket.SetScopes(OpenIdConnectConstants.Scopes.OfflineAccess);

        return SignIn(ticket.Principal, ticket.Properties, ticket.AuthenticationScheme);
    }
    // (...)
}

Note that you'll also have to handle the grant_type=refresh_token requests in your controller. Here's an example using Identity: https://github.com/openiddict/openiddict-samples/blob/dev/samples/RefreshFlow/AuthorizationServer/Controllers/AuthorizationController.cs#L75-L109

0

options.AllowPasswordFlow();

Refresh Token cannot be used with Password flow, as the user is never redirected to login at Auth Server in this flow and so can’t directly authorize the application:

If the application uses the username-password OAuth authentication flow, no refresh token is issued, as the user cannot authorize the application in this flow. If the access token expires, the application using username-password OAuth flow must re-authenticate the user.

  • 2
    It's worth noting that while Salesforce decided they didn't want to return a refresh token for password flow requests, this is absolutely not prohibited by the OAuth2 specification: If the access token request is valid and authorized, the authorization server issues an access token and optional refresh token tools.ietf.org/html/rfc6749#section-4.3.3 – Pinpoint Oct 10 '17 at 20:50
  • 2
    FWIW, I personally think that not returning a refresh token with the password flow is a terrible mistake, as it encourages client applications to work around this limitation by storing the username/password to retrieve new access tokens when they need to without having to ask the user his/her credentials again and again (which is fundamentally bad). – Pinpoint Oct 10 '17 at 20:53

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