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I would like to create a table of data, and keep it in non-dirty memory (so that the table doesn't contribute to them memory usage of the app on iOS and related platforms (tvOS/watchOS)).

The table is an array of two pieces of data: Objective-C class and a numeric value:

#include <Foundation/Foundation.h>
struct TypeMap {
    Class class;
    int value;
};

I'd like to do something like this:

struct TypeMap map [] = {
    { [NSObject class], 0x1234 }
};

but that obviously doesn't work, clang complains with:

test.m:9:4: error: initializer element is not a compile-time constant
        { [NSObject class], 0x1234 }
          ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

which makes total sense of course, since [NSObject class] is not a compile-time constant.

But there is a symbol that the dynamic loader is able to resolve: _OBJC_CLASS_$_NSObject, which leads me to something like this:

extern Class OBJC_CLASS_$_NSObject;
struct TypeMap map [] = {
    { OBJC_CLASS_$_NSObject, 0x1234 }
};

The idea being that the dynamic linker can resolve the symbol at runtime, and then mark the memory as read-only (the same way it works for normal code).

Unfortunately it runs into the same problem:

test.m:11:4: error: initializer element is not a compile-time constant
        { OBJC_CLASS_$_NSObject, 0x1234 }
          ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I'm certain I can express this in assembly code, but I'd like to avoid assembly if possible and stick with Objective-C (no need to implement it once per platform).

Am I completely off track here? Is this even possible?

UPDATE

Working version:

// clang test.m -framework Foundation
#include <Foundation/Foundation.h>
#include <objc/objc.h>
#include <objc/runtime.h>

struct TypeMap {
    Class class;
    int value;
};

extern void* OBJC_CLASS_$_NSObject;
const struct TypeMap map [] = {
    { (Class) &OBJC_CLASS_$_NSObject, 0x1234 },
};

int main ()
{
    printf ("%s %p %i\n", class_getName (map[0].class), map [0].class, map [0].value);
    return 0;
}
  • Is there a reason for the c-tag or do you just find it aesthetically pleasing? – EOF Oct 10 '17 at 17:49
  • I am unfamiliar with the term "non-dirty memory". In context I believe you mean "read-only data segment" but I'm not 100% sure. Please clarify. – zwol Oct 10 '17 at 17:53
  • @zwol: by non-dirty memory I mean memory that iOS can page out (and won't count against the app's memory limit). See stackoverflow.com/a/19238896/183422 for a deeper explanation. – Rolf Bjarne Kvinge Oct 12 '17 at 5:33
1

If I understand correctly, a Class in Objective-C is an aggregate type, in the sense in which the C standard uses that term. Then, given

struct TypeMap {
    Class class;
    int value;
};

extern Class OBJC_CLASS_$_NSObject;
struct TypeMap map [] = {
    { OBJC_CLASS_$_NSObject, 0x1234 }
};

you are asking the dynamic loader to copy the aggregate into your data structure, at load time, which is not a feature that it has.

What you should be able to do instead is have your TypeMap contain pointers to the OBJC_CLASS_$_... symbols:

struct TypeMap {
    Class *class;
    int value;
};

extern Class OBJC_CLASS_$_NSObject;
const struct TypeMap map[] = {
    { &OBJC_CLASS_$_NSObject, 0x1234 },
    // ...
};

Give that a whirl and see how it goes.

(Note the added const on the declaration of map — you need that to get this data structure put in the read-only data segment in the first place.)

  • The answer isn't 100% correct though, since it seems the symbol is the aggregate data. That means this is the working version: struct TypeMap { Class class; int value; }; extern void* OBJC_CLASS_$_NSObject; struct TypeMap map [] = { { (Class) &OBJC_CLASS_$_NSObject, 0x1234 }, }; – Rolf Bjarne Kvinge Oct 12 '17 at 5:57
  • Further testing reveals that while this compiles, it does not solve my problem: Instruments shows the data ends up as dirty memory. If I write it in code (a method with a giant switch statement), then it doesn't end up as dirty memory, so this is obviously something technically possible. – Rolf Bjarne Kvinge Oct 12 '17 at 9:04
  • @RolfBjarneKvinge I'm sorry, I don't know enough about Objective-C or the iOS programming environment to help you any further. You should ask a new question highlighting the contrast between your "struct TypeMap" and giant-switch-statement approaches. – zwol Oct 17 '17 at 14:48

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