331

If I omit the -Xmxn option from the Java command line a default value is used. According to Java documentation "the default value is chosen at runtime based on system configuration".

What system configuration settings influence the default value?

422

On Windows systems, you can use the following command to find out the defaults on the system where your applications runs.

java -XX:+PrintFlagsFinal -version | findstr HeapSize

Look for the options MaxHeapSize (for -Xmx) and InitialHeapSize for -Xms.

On a Unix/Linux system, you can do

java -XX:+PrintFlagsFinal -version | grep HeapSize

I believe the resulting output is in bytes.

  • 3
    I was hoping for a nice option like this, but it didn't work for me using IBM's Java 6 VM. – Matt Lavin Jun 18 '13 at 20:14
  • Great! Can I play with all these default options? What's the corresponding ENV variable for each? – Elist Jul 20 '13 at 19:17
  • 20
    In my case on Linux, InitialHeapSize = 262803264 and MaxHeapSize = 4206886912 which is about 256 MB and 4 GB if I'm not mistaken. Does this mean that every JVM starts as if it was launched with -Xms256m -Xmx4g options? – Yura Nov 25 '14 at 10:28
  • 7
    On a Windows system: java -XX:+PrintFlagsFinal -version | findstr /R /C:"HeapSize" – sp00m Apr 14 '15 at 13:08
  • 1
    @matanster On my Linux -version suppresses the long "usage" text on stderr. – Franklin Yu Oct 16 '17 at 15:40
100

According to Garbage Collector Ergonomics [Oracle]:

initial heap size:

Larger of 1/64th of the machine's physical memory on the machine or some reasonable minimum. Before J2SE 5.0, the default initial heap size was a reasonable minimum, which varies by platform. You can override this default using the -Xms command-line option.

maximum heap size:

Smaller of 1/4th of the physical memory or 1GB. Before J2SE 5.0, the default maximum heap size was 64MB. You can override this default using the -Xmx command-line option.

UPDATE:

As pointed out by Tom Anderson in his comment, the above is for server-class machines. From Ergonomics in the 5.0 JavaTM Virtual Machine:

In the J2SE platform version 5.0 a class of machine referred to as a server-class machine has been defined as a machine with

  • 2 or more physical processors
  • 2 or more Gbytes of physical memory

with the exception of 32 bit platforms running a version of the Windows operating system. On all other platforms the default values are the same as the default values for version 1.4.2.

In the J2SE platform version 1.4.2 by default the following selections were made

  • initial heap size of 4 Mbyte
  • maximum heap size of 64 Mbyte
  • 3
    Caveat: that's for server-class machines, not client-class. You need to read that document in conjunction with java.sun.com/docs/hotspot/gc5.0/ergo5.html which defines those terms and what happens to client-class machines. dogbane, might i humbly suggest you edit your answer to quote the relevant passages? – Tom Anderson Jan 12 '11 at 12:18
  • 3
    That is a ridiculously low default in 2012. Very few serious applications will fit inside 64 megabytes. – Mark E. Haase Aug 16 '12 at 14:56
  • 1
    See Ernesto's Oct 30, 2012 answer for client machines after Java 6 update 18. – Andy Thomas Feb 15 '13 at 21:13
  • Also keep in mind that it says: "The boundaries and fractions given for the heap size are correct for J2SE 5.0. They are likely to be different in subsequent releases as computers get more powerful." – Lodovik Oct 27 '15 at 19:06
  • By the way, this algo is only for Parallel Garbage Collector. – Mike Argyriou May 15 '17 at 10:16
27

This is changed with Java 6 update 18.

Assuming that we have more than 1 GB of physical memory (quite common these days), it's always 1/4th of your physical memory.

  • 7
    Incorrect, the linked page says greater than or equal to 1 gigabyte of physical memory results in a maximum heap size of 256 megabytes – Paolo Fulgoni Oct 21 '14 at 13:23
  • 3
    I just checked on a linux machine with 5gb physical memory. Default max heap shows as 1.5gb – ernesto Jan 22 '15 at 8:44
  • @PaoloFulgoni no, another practical example I observe right now: 129 Gbytes of physical memory results in 32 Gbyte of max heap size – Derp Jan 29 at 15:56
15

Ernesto is right. According to the link he posted [1]:

Updated Client JVM heap configuration

In the Client JVM...

  • The default maximum heap size is half of the physical memory up to a physical memory size of 192 megabytes and otherwise one fourth of the physical memory up to a physical memory size of 1 gigabyte.

    For example, if your machine has 128 megabytes of physical memory, then the maximum heap size is 64 megabytes, and greater than or equal to 1 gigabyte of physical memory results in a maximum heap size of 256 megabytes.

  • The maximum heap size is not actually used by the JVM unless your program creates enough objects to require it. A much smaller amount, termed the initial heap size, is allocated during JVM initialization. ...

  • ...
  • Server JVM heap configuration ergonomics are now the same as the Client, except that the default maximum heap size for 32-bit JVMs is 1 gigabyte, corresponding to a physical memory size of 4 gigabytes, and for 64-bit JVMs is 32 gigabytes, corresponding to a physical memory size of 128 gigabytes.

[1] http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/6u18-142093.html

12

Java 8 takes more than 1/6th of your physical memory for your Xmssize (Minimum HeapSize) and less than 1/4th of your physical memory for your -Xmxsize (Maximum HeapSize).

You can Check the default Java heap size by:

In Windows:

java -XX:+PrintFlagsFinal -version | findstr /i "HeapSize PermSize ThreadStackSize"

In Linux:

java -XX:+PrintFlagsFinal -version | grep -iE 'HeapSize|PermSize|ThreadStackSize'

What system configuration settings influence the default value?

Your physical memory and your Java version.

7

default value is chosen at runtime based on system configuration

Have a look at documentation page

Default Heap Size

Unless the initial and maximum heap sizes are specified on the command line, they are calculated based on the amount of memory on the machine.

  1. Client JVM Default Initial and Maximum Heap Sizes:

    The default maximum heap size is half of the physical memory up to a physical memory size of 192 megabytes (MB) and otherwise one fourth of the physical memory up to a physical memory size of 1 gigabyte (GB).

  2. Server JVM Default Initial and Maximum Heap Sizes:

    On 32-bit JVMs, the default maximum heap size can be up to 1 GB if there is 4 GB or more of physical memory. On 64-bit JVMs, the default maximum heap size can be up to 32 GB if there is 128 GB or more of physical memory

What system configuration settings influence the default value?

You can specify the initial and maximum heap sizes using the flags -Xms (initial heap size) and -Xmx (maximum heap size). If you know how much heap your application needs to work well, you can set -Xms and -Xmx to the same value

6

For the IBM JVM, the command is the following:

java -verbose:sizes -version

For more information about the IBM SDK for Java 8 - http://www-01.ibm.com/support/knowledgecenter/SSYKE2_8.0.0/com.ibm.java.lnx.80.doc/diag/appendixes/defaults.html?lang=en

  • The link seems to be (effectively) broken. – Peter Mortensen Mar 16 '18 at 0:47
  • @PeterMortensen just checked - link is fine – n0mer Mar 20 '18 at 18:22
1

A number of parameters affect generation size. The following diagram illustrates the difference between committed space and virtual space in the heap. At initialization of the virtual machine, the entire space for the heap is reserved. The size of the space reserved can be specified with the -Xmx option. If the value of the -Xms parameter is smaller than the value of the -Xmx parameter, not all of the space that is reserved is immediately committed to the virtual machine. The uncommitted space is labeled "virtual" in this figure. The different parts of the heap (permanent generation, tenured generation and young generation) can grow to the limit of the virtual space as needed.

enter image description here

By default, the virtual machine grows or shrinks the heap at each collection to try to keep the proportion of free space to live objects at each collection within a specific range. This target range is set as a percentage by the parameters -XX:MinHeapFreeRatio=<minimum> and -XX:MaxHeapFreeRatio=<maximum>, and the total size is bounded below by -Xms<min> and above by -Xmx<max>.

Parameter Default Value

MinHeapFreeRatio 40

MaxHeapFreeRatio 70

-Xms 3670k

-Xmx 64m

Default values of heap size parameters on 64-bit systems have been scaled up by approximately 30%. This increase is meant to compensate for the larger size of objects on a 64-bit system.

With these parameters, if the percent of free space in a generation falls below 40%, the generation will be expanded to maintain 40% free space, up to the maximum allowed size of the generation. Similarly, if the free space exceeds 70%, the generation will be contracted so that only 70% of the space is free, subject to the minimum size of the generation.

Large server applications often experience two problems with these defaults. One is slow startup, because the initial heap is small and must be resized over many major collections. A more pressing problem is that the default maximum heap size is unreasonably small for most server applications. The rules of thumb for server applications are:

  • Unless you have problems with pauses, try granting as much memory as possible to the virtual machine. The default size (64MB) is often too small.
  • Setting -Xms and -Xmx to the same value increases predictability by removing the most important sizing decision from the virtual machine. However, the virtual machine is then unable to compensate if you make a poor choice.
  • In general, increase the memory as you increase the number of processors, since allocation can be parallelized.

    There is the full article

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.