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I would like to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using ORM (such as ADO.NET).

Advantages:

  • Speeds-up Development - eliminates the need for repetitive SQL code.
  • Reduces Development Time.
  • Reduces Development Costs.
  • Overcomes vendor specific SQL differences - the ORM knows how to write vendor specific SQL so you don't have to.

Disadvantages:

  • Loss in developer productivity whilst they learn to program with ORM.
  • Developers lose understanding of what the code is actually doing - the developer is more in control using SQL.
  • ORM has a tendency to be slow.
  • ORM fail to compete against SQL queries for complex queries.

In summary, I believe that the advantages of using an ORM (mainly the reduced time taken to perform repetitive tasks) are far outweighed by the disadvantages of ORM e.g. it's difficulty to get to grips with.

Can people point out where I am going wrong and suggest any further advantages/disadvantages.

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    ADO.NET itself is not an "ORM".
    – CJ7
    Dec 1 '11 at 14:42
  • "We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion." The absence of the former precludes the latter. If your opinion is that a question will solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion should it not first be proven that any answers to the question must inherently lack facts, references, and expertise? The burden of proof is on the closer of the question.
    – aj.toulan
    Jul 23 '19 at 15:17
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"ORM fail to compete against SQL queries for complex queries."

  • Well both LINQ-SQL and Entity Framework Allow complex queries and even translation of SQL query results into objects.

"Developers loose understanding of what the code is actually doing - the developer is more in control using SQL."

  • Not really, if you know what you are doing. SQL profiler is enough to see what the translated SQL queries are.

"ORM has a tendency to be slow."

  • Yes, but delay loading and some smart options can make it almost as fast.

"Loss in developer productivity whilst they learn to program with ORM."

  • Hibernate and the Entity Framework might take time to learn but in the long run they will save time in development. LINQ-SQL on the other hand has little to no learning curve involved.

I say, use ORM but keep this in mind.

  1. Design your queries and write code that will result in the least number of roundtrips with the server. It's the overhead taken for the roundtrip that takes up time.

  2. Read about the experiences other people have had with the selected ORM before you dig in too deep.

  3. Always compare your queries with the actual ones being executed in SQL server profiler.

Edit: You wouldn't use an ORM for a performance critical situation same way you wouldn't use .Net or Java to write an operating system. Consider your requirements before choosing. Even if you don't use an ORM, you will end up doing some mapping yourself either via repeating a lot of code or by using a data dictionary. Why not use an ORM and know how to use its options to make it ALMOST as fast? Weigh up the advantages and disadvantages and make your choice.

http://mikehadlow.blogspot.ca/2012/06/when-should-i-use-orm.html

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    Regarding "Always compare your queries with the actual ones being executed", that defeats the whole purpose of using ORM in the first place.
    – Pacerier
    Mar 29 '15 at 3:03
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    No it doesn't. The purpose of an ORM isn't just to make queries. You have to check queries to see whether they are the converted to the most efficient form or else tweak your ORM query as needed. Also most ORM's support direct SQL query result translation to Entities. Don't expect not to know SQL and use CRUD even with an ORM unless it's very simple project. Mar 29 '15 at 12:54
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    Indeed that's the whole purpose of ORMs: for very simple projects with no bottlenecks anywhere. When you get to the point where "You have to check queries to see whether they are the converted to the most efficient form or else tweak your ORM query as needed", it defeats the whole purpose of using ORM in the first place, because the purpose of using ORM is to avoid exactly that.
    – Pacerier
    Apr 5 '15 at 10:44
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    You can't add an answer to a question that's closed. And yes, back to ORM again, ORM is only used for hacking up some simple app that doesn't need any db performance. It's your definition of "big" and "db heavy" that needs revising. Name me some big db-heavy projects using ORM to solve their persistent needs. Yes, the whole purpose of ORM is not to touch queries at all. So you ask "Why ORM's support querying via SQL". Indeed, that's what I've been saying right from the.............................................................................‌​........
    – Pacerier
    Apr 7 '15 at 14:41
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    ............................................................first comment and Yes, you're starting to see the light. Is the answer not plain obvious enough? I guess it's not to people buried too deep into ORM, so allow me to explain why ORMs must allow raw SQL: Because the abstraction is leaky. They realize that their brainchild only works for the simple use cases and now they have two options, 1: Throw the baby out, or 2: Give people the ability to ignore ORM and do raw SQL. Guess which they've chosen?
    – Pacerier
    Apr 7 '15 at 14:41
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Depending on the requirement, you might want to choose to use or not ORM. For example: Multiple persistence engine support (need to run on Oracle, DB2, MySQL, SQL Server, etc.), you might benefit from the abstraction that you get from ORM at the cost of potential app performance lost.

If you know that you are going to only support a particular persistence engine and you want to be able to take advantage of a particular feature in the persistence engine that might not be supported in the ORM, well... clear enough which choice you should choose.

Another factor might be developer knowledge like you mentioned and the time to learn the new stuffs and the actual project time (hard deadline, etc.). This goes for both staffs that know a particular ORM already versus staffs that does not know ORM but excel in ADO.NET / any other lower level data access technology.

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