-5

I put the code directly.

#include <stdio.h>
struct A
{
    int a;
    int b;
};
int main()
{
    struct A test;
    double *p = (double *)&(test.a);
    *p = 5;

    printf("variable a: %d\n", &test.a);
    printf("variable b: %d\n", &test.b);
    return 0;
}

I run this code in centos7, the compiler is gcc4.8.5.And my computer uses little ending to store.

As you see, the memory of variable b will be overwritten, I expected a is 0x0000 0005 and b is 0x0000 0000.

But the answer is:

variable a: 0
variable b: 1075052544

Why variable a is 0x 0000 0000 and b is 0x4014 0000?

  • 5
    This is undefined behavior. Also, the double 5 corresponds to the 64-bit integer 0x4014000000000000 so you can probably figure out what's happening. Hint: double can be larger than int. – unwind Oct 11 '17 at 12:52
  • 3
    You get unexpected result because you lied to your compiler, and it figured a way to get back at you. You told the compiler that &(test.a) is an address of a double, but it is an address of an integer. – dasblinkenlight Oct 11 '17 at 12:54
  • You can twiddle with the optimization settings and get your compiler to compile code where the result is something else as well. – Antti Haapala Oct 11 '17 at 12:56
  • @Bathsheba just writing here that the output doesn't match the code, so, why did you reverse my downvote?! – Antti Haapala Oct 11 '17 at 12:58
  • 1
    The code is a strict aliasing violation and therefore completely undefined behavior. It is pointless to reason about the effects of undefined behavior. – Lundin Oct 11 '17 at 15:18
4

The behaviour of your code is undefined.

You can't dereference p once you've set it to the address of something that is not a double type.

To see what your compiler has done with this input, check the generated assembly.

  • In my computer, int occupies 4 bytes, double occupies 8 bytes, I use double pointer to int and assignment, it should override the value of variable b, so I think b should be 5, a should be 0.And 1075052544 is a fixed value that does not change with each run or change optimization. – UKeeySDis Oct 11 '17 at 13:07
  • 1
    You can think what you want to think. That's obviously not what is happening. The fact remains the behaviour is undefined. – Bathsheba Oct 11 '17 at 13:08
  • The double 5 corresponds to the 64-bit integer 0x4014000000000000.So I get b is 0x4014 0000, the value of the variable b is the other half of the 4 bytes. – UKeeySDis Oct 11 '17 at 13:28
  • 1
    @UKeeySDis: you could verify that by setting a 64 bit integer to a given value, a double to another value, and calling memcmp. All perfectly defined behaviour. – Bathsheba Oct 11 '17 at 13:32
  • This is really a good idea, I verify it.But why the double 5 corresponds to the 64-bit integer 0x4014000000000000?How it is stored?Thank you very much. – UKeeySDis Oct 11 '17 at 13:41
1

The behaviour of your code is undefined.

Clang compiler generate warning message:

source_file.c:13:20: warning: format specifies type 'int' but the argument has type 'int *' [-Wformat]
    printf("%d\n", &test.a);
            ~~     ^~~~~~~
source_file.c:14:20: warning: format specifies type 'int' but the argument has type 'int *' [-Wformat]
    printf("%d\n", &test.b);
            ~~     ^~~~~~~

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