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For some reason, the answer in the post below doesn't work for me. Any thoughts?
how to use sed to replace a string in a file with a shell variable

I'm running CentOS 6.5

`NEW="new value"
cat myfile.txt | sed -e 's/old/${NEW}' <-- just replaces 'old' with '${NEW}'
cat myfile.txt | sed -e 's/old/$NEW' <-- just replaces 'old' with '$NEW'
cat myfile.txt | sed -e "s/old/${NEW}" <-- gives the error: unknown option to `s'
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    Also sed takes filenames as args, no need for cat. Also s/// requires three delimiters – 123 Oct 11 '17 at 17:18
  • Thank you. I was using cat just as a way to test this without modifying the file. – Adoyt Oct 11 '17 at 18:58
0

try taking the 's off the sed e.g

$ new=N
$ cat > j
one
two
three
$ sed -e "s/one/${new}/" j
N
two
three

for a more complete answer try this answer

  • Thanks! wrapping the shell variable in double-quotes worked! Like so: sed -e 's/old/'"$NEW"'/' – Adoyt Oct 11 '17 at 18:56

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