4

So I have some code which performs a binary search. Why is it essential for L and U to be compared with <=. Would I not get the same result with <?

  public static int bsearch(int t, List<Integer> A) {
    int L = 0, U = A.size() - 1;
    while (L <= U) { //******cant I just do: while(L<U) *****?
      int M = (L + U) / 2;
      if (A.get(M) < t) {
        L = M + 1;
      } else if (A.get(M) == t) {
        return M;
      } else {
        U = M - 1;
      }
    }
    return -1;
  }
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  • 1
    What about a list of size 1?
    – Joe C
    Commented Oct 11, 2017 at 21:25
  • It depends on the initial definition for L and U.
    – Alfabravo
    Commented Oct 11, 2017 at 21:25
  • 1
    Think about the case where L == U, if you use <= you'll check that element, while < won't
    – marcadian
    Commented Oct 11, 2017 at 21:26
  • But marcadian if A.get(M) == t we return M. So L==U should not be a problem
    – Matt
    Commented Oct 11, 2017 at 21:29

2 Answers 2

3

Here is an edge case where this would not work: a list of size 1.

In this case, we would have L == U == 0. Even if that one element happened to be the one for which you are looking, because the while condition is not satisfied with <, your element is never found.

4
  • would that be the only edge case?
    – Matt
    Commented Oct 11, 2017 at 21:28
  • 1
    Only one I can think of off the top of my head. I cannot guarantee it's the only edge case that exists though.
    – Joe C
    Commented Oct 11, 2017 at 21:29
  • 1
    @Matt Many other cases for example list with the numbers 0-99 search for 1 I will leave it to you and Joe to figure out why.
    – Oleg
    Commented Oct 11, 2017 at 21:48
  • 2
    @Oleg Nah, Joe's about to go to bed :)
    – Joe C
    Commented Oct 11, 2017 at 21:50
2

L and U may be better named L and R. They define the left and right extents of the unsearched section of the array. If your search narrows down to a single element, then they will be equal, but in order to test that last element, the while condition must hold or else you will skip it.

This is not only true in a list of one element. For example, searching the list { 1, 2, 3 } for the element 1. You will check 2, see that it's greater, reduce U to 0, and then will need to check element 0, which can only happen if you continue to check when L == U.

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