I'm trying to create an inventory system for a text based game. I'm currently working on the function that adds objects that were derived from a class called Items to a vector and then call a function from the derived class to update its quantity. I was able to do that fairly easily, but I want to add some checks in the function so instead of adding a duplicate object into the vector it would find the duplicate object and call its function that updates its quantity.

I tried doing this but the program would crash when ever the program got to delete. So I decided to try and removing delete and was able to call the function showInventory() and got very strange results.

I'm trying to figure out how to check if a class object is already being stored in a vector and if it is return the elements posistion in the vector so I can use the objects addQuant() function so I can update its quantity

std::vector<Items*> inv;

void Inventory::AddtoInv( Items* s)
{
    if (!inv.empty())
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < inv.size(); i++)
        {
            if (inv[i]->getName() == s->getName())
            {
                inv[i]->addQuant();
                delete s;
            }
            else
            {
                s->addQuant();
                inv.push_back(s);
            }
        }
    }
    else{
        s->addQuant();
        inv.push_back(s);
    }
}

void Inventory::ShowInv()
{
    std::cout << "your inventory" << std::endl;
    for (unsigned int i = 0;i < inv.size(); i++)
    {
        std::cout << i << ": " << inv[i]->getName() << "    x" << inv[i]->showQuant() << std::endl;
    }
}

I also tried this but std::find() doesn't find the object.

if (std::find(inv.begin(), inv.end(), s) != inv.end())
{

    std::cout << "you already have this item" << std::endl;
}
else
{
    inv.push_back(s);
    std::cout << "added item: " << s->getName << std::endl;
}
  • You have a vector of pointers, so he default behaviour of std::find(inv.begin(), inv.end(), s) is going to be comparing pointers. If the addresses aren't the same, you don't have the same instance, no matter how similar the contents of the objects at the pointers are they won't match. That makes this question a duplicate of std::find() on a vector of pointers – user4581301 Oct 12 '17 at 0:16
  • What does the code look like that is calling AddtoInv()? – Remy Lebeau Oct 12 '17 at 1:25
  • Please explain to your rubber duck what happens in AddtoInv if inv already contains four pointers and s has the same name as the third element. – aschepler Oct 12 '17 at 1:29
  • @RemyLebeau its used in a case, so case 1: inv.AddtoInv(new Grain) it's passing in a child of the Items class. – timmie124 Oct 12 '17 at 1:39
  • Using new directly in a function parameter like that is bad practice. If AddtoInv() throws an exception (like on inv.push_back()), then you leak memory. In this situation, consider using std::unique_ptr<Items> for the AddtoInv() parameter, and std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Items>> for the inv. That way, there is no question about who owns what. And you gain automated destruction of the inventory items when inv is cleared or destroyed, so you don't have to do it manually – Remy Lebeau Oct 12 '17 at 1:59
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your AddtoInv() function can be simplified to this:

Items* Inventory::GetfromInv(const string &name)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < inv.size(); ++i)
    {
        if (inv[i]->getName() == name)
            return inv[i];
    }

    /* alternatively:

    auto iter = std::find_if(inv.begin(), inv.end(), [&](Items *item){ return (item->getName() == name); });
    if (iter != inv.end())
        return *iter;
    */

    return 0;
}

void Inventory::AddtoInv( Items* s)
{
    Items *item = GetfromInv(s->getName());
    if (!item)
    {
        inv.push_back(s);
        item = s;
    }
    else
        delete s;

    item->addQuant();
}

That being said, getting crashes on delete, and weird results from showInv(), implies that you are not managing your pointers correctly. Such as if you are destroying objects that are stilling being pointed to by the inv vector. But you didn't show any of the code that is calling AddInv() or otherwise using the inventory, so we can't help you diagnose any issues you may have in that code.

  • Thank you that worked perfectly! someone suggested using std::find_if, is there any advantage or disadvantage of using this over find_if or vice versa? – timmie124 Oct 12 '17 at 1:33
  • std::find_if() and find_if() are the same function. The latter will compile only if you have a using namespace std; statement (which you shoudn't be using) or a using std::find_if; statement – Remy Lebeau Oct 12 '17 at 1:37
  • I meant the advantage or disadvantage of using find_if over the code you posted? – timmie124 Oct 12 '17 at 1:41
  • std::find_if() is a standardized algorithm in the STL, why duplicate the same work that has already been done for you? – Remy Lebeau Oct 12 '17 at 1:56

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