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I'm trying to solve the following linear programming problem in Python 2.7 and for some reason, linprog is not returning the correct results.

Minimize: -x2 -x3

such that:

x0 + 0.33*x2 + 0.67*x3 = 0.5
x1 + 0.67*x2 + 0.33*x3 = 0.5
x0 + x1 + x2 + x3 = 1.0

Here's my code:

from scipy.optimize import linprog

a_eq = [[1.0, 0.0, 0.33, 0.67],
        [0.0, 1.0, 0.67, 0.33], 
        [1, 1, 1, 1]]

b_eq = [0.5, 0.5, 1.0]

c = [0, 0, -1.0, -1.0]

x = linprog(c=c, A_eq=a_eq, b_eq=b_eq)
print x

Here's the output of the above:

fun: -0.0
message: 'Optimization terminated successfully.'
nit: 4
slack: array([], dtype=float64)
status: 0
success: True
x: array([ 0.5,  0.5,  0. ,  0. ])

Clearly, the following solution is more optimal:

x: array([0.0, 0.0, 0.5, 0.5])

which makes the objective function value:

fun: -1.0

I did find some issues reported in github. Could this be what I'm facing or am I doing something wrong? Any help will be greatly appreciated! Thanks.

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I did find some issues reported in github. Could this be what I'm facing...?

Exactly:

It turns out that A_eq in the problem is rank-deficient. After finding and removing rows that are a linear combination of others, linprog's solution agrees with the other.

The matrix a_eq is rank deficient. The last row is a linear combination of the first two rows. This makes the row redundant for the constraint so we can simply remove it and the corresponding entry in b_eq:

a_eq = [[1.0, 0.0, 0.33, 0.67],
        [0.0, 1.0, 0.67, 0.33]]

b_eq = [0.5, 0.5]

This results in the optimal solution x: array([ 0. , 0. , 0.5, 0.5]).

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    OMG! I can't believe I overlooked the fact that the third row was a sum of the first two! I was convinced that the three equations were linearly independent! My bad. Thanks kazemakase – Ram Oct 12 '17 at 8:30

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