23

When use spring annotation @Bean to declare some instances, the arguments be injection, and these are required, if can't find instance, will throw NoSuchBeanException.

How to make it optional? Something like @Autowired(required = false)

For example

@Configuration
class SomeConfiguration {

  @Bean
  public SomeComponent someComponent(Depend1 depend1,
                                     Depend2 depend2) {
    SomeComponent someComponent = new SomeComponent();
    someComponent.setDepend1(depend1);
    if (depend2 != null) {
      someComponent.setDepend2(depend2);
    }
    return someComponent;
  }
}

3 Answers 3

31

Just use Optional:

@Bean
public SomeComponent someComponent(Depend1 depend1, Optional<Depend2> depend2) {
   ...
}
5
  • 2
    When using Optional as a parameter, Intellij IDEA displays a suggested warning. If there is no better way, I'll use it
    – JonasGao
    Commented Oct 13, 2017 at 12:43
  • 1
    Well, intellij should be improved then, because this is the best method: it clearly state the design: one mandatory dependency and one optional, without using the billion dollars mistake (i.e. null)
    – Juh_
    Commented Jul 30, 2019 at 13:14
  • 1
    @Juh_ The same can be achieved with @Nullable annotation. Using Optional doesn't have any advantage over using @Nullable in general, i.e. a caller could still pass null for an Optional and break everything.
    – ashu
    Commented Oct 27, 2021 at 9:53
  • The point of using Optional is to never use null, nowhere. If you use @Nullable somewhere, it means that using null is part of you design, and thus any variable could be null anywhere. That's basically the "billion dollar mistake". You can try to patch it by puting NonNullable everywhere, but that's just that, a design patch. On the other hand, if you remove all cases of null value in your code, using it becomes illegal. Same as, for example, using introspection to access private fields: You can but you're not supposed to. And if you do, you take responsibility
    – Juh_
    Commented Oct 27, 2021 at 14:00
  • 1
    From Java documentation: API Note: Optional is primarily intended for use as a method return type where there is a clear need to represent "no result," and where using null is likely to cause errors. A variable whose type is Optional should never itself be null; it should always point to an Optional instance. Commented Jul 8, 2022 at 10:15
24

You can use @Autowired(required = false) on a parameter:

@Configuration
class SomeConfiguration {

  @Bean
  public SomeComponent someComponent(Depend1 depend1,
                                     @Autowired(required = false) Depend2 depend2) {
    SomeComponent someComponent = new SomeComponent();
    someComponent.setDepend1(depend1);
    if (depend2 != null) {
      someComponent.setDepend2(depend2);
    }
    return someComponent;
  }
}
1

Or you could define multiple profiles like so

@Configuration
@Profile("dev")
class DevConfiguration {

  @Bean
  public SomeComponent someComponent(Depend1 depend1) {
    SomeComponent someComponent = new SomeComponent();
    someComponent.setDepend1(depend1);
    return someComponent;
  }
}

and

@Configuration
@Profile("prod")
class ProdConfiguration {

  @Bean
  public SomeComponent someComponent(Depend1 depend1, Depend2 depend2) {
    SomeComponent someComponent = new SomeComponent();
    someComponent.setDepend1(depend1);
    someComponent.setDepend2(depend2);
    return someComponent;
  }
}

when you now start your application with the command line argument -Dspring.profiles.active="dev" or -Dspring.profiles.active="prod" it'll select the correct bean for you. In case multiple profiles,test and dev for example, require the same implementation you can simply replace @Profile("dev")with @Profile({"dev","test"})

1
  • 1
    It would be even simpler since @Profile can be used on method, so you could have one configuration class.
    – user
    Commented Nov 14, 2019 at 12:51

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