I am currently working on an application that is responsible for calculating random permutations of a jagged array.

Currently the bulk of the time in the application is spent copying the array in each iteration (1 million iterations total). On my current system, the entire process takes 50 seconds to complete, 39 of those seconds spent cloning the array.

My array cloning routine is the following:

    public static int[][] CopyArray(this int[][] source)
    {
        int[][] destination = new int[source.Length][];
        // For each Row
        for (int y = 0; y < source.Length; y++)
        {
            // Initialize Array
            destination[y] = new int[source[y].Length];
            // For each Column
            for (int x = 0; x < destination[y].Length; x++)
            {
                destination[y][x] = source[y][x];
            }
        }
        return destination;
    }

Is there any way, safe or unsafe, to achieve the same effect as above, much faster?

  • 1
    Have you tried to use multidimensional arrays instead of jagged ones, i.e. static int[,] instead of static int [][]? – Igor Korkhov Jan 12 '11 at 16:21
up vote 20 down vote accepted

Either of these should work for you. They both run in about the same amount of time and are both much faster than your method.

// 100 passes on a int[1000][1000] set size

// 701% faster than original (14.26%)
static int[][] CopyArrayLinq(int[][] source)
{
    return source.Select(s => s.ToArray()).ToArray();
}

// 752% faster than original (13.38%)
static int[][] CopyArrayBuiltIn(int[][] source)
{
    var len = source.Length;
    var dest = new int[len][];

    for (var x = 0; x < len; x++)
    {
        var inner = source[x];
        var ilen = inner.Length;
        var newer = new int[ilen];
        Array.Copy(inner, newer, ilen);
        dest[x] = newer;
    }

    return dest;
}
  • Such a relief for me to find this: btw, it looks pretty easy to extend this to more dimensions: return source.Select(s => s.Select(p => p.ToArray()).ToArray()).ToArray(); – Javid Pack Feb 23 '16 at 22:48

how about serializing/deserializing the array, if you use memory streams and binary serialization, I am thinking that it should be pretty quick.

  • 2
    Serialization is probably orders of magnitude slower than his current implementation. – Pent Ploompuu Jan 12 '11 at 16:14

You can use Array.Clone for the inner loop:

public static int[][] CopyArray(this int[][] source)
{
    int[][] destination = new int[source.Length][];
    // For each Row
    for(int y = 0;y < source.Length;y++)
    {
        destination[y] = (int[])source[y].Clone();
    }
    return destination;
}

Another alternative for the inner loop is Buffer.BlockCopy, but I haven't measured it's performance against Array.Clone - maybe it's faster:

destination[y] = new int[source[y].Length];
Buffer.BlockCopy(source[y], 0, destination[y], 0, source[y].Length * 4);

Edit: Buffer.BlockCopy takes the number for bytes to copy for the count parameter, not the number of array elements.

  • I tried your first solution. Unfortunately, it only shaves a couple of seconds off the entire run time. I'll try your second solution. – George Johnston Jan 12 '11 at 16:13
  • Your second option is pretty comparible to the first. Only shaved a second or two off the total time as compared to my original method. – George Johnston Jan 12 '11 at 16:23

The faster way to copy objects is not to copy them at all - have you considered this option? If you just need to generate permutations you don't need to copy data on each one - just change the array. This approach will not work well if you need to keep on results of previous calls. In any case review your code to see if you are not copying data more times that you have to.

  • I need seperate copies of the array, as each permutation needs to have an original working set. – George Johnston Jan 12 '11 at 17:12

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