Take the following snippet:

case x of
  1: begin
    Assert(ChildCount = 2);
    ChildNode[0].ToString(Builder);
    Builder.Append(F);
    ChildNode[1].ToString(Builder);
  end; {1:}

If the assertion triggers I lose all context and the local variables inspector will show inaccessible value everywhere.

enter image description here

I can fix this by adding an extra if-then and manually place a breakpoint like so:

case x of
  1: begin
    if not(ChildCount = 2) then
      Assert(ChildCount = 2);   <-- add breakpoint here.
    ChildNode[0].ToString(Builder);
    Builder.Append(F);
    ChildNode[1].ToString(Builder);
  end; {1:}

This however bulks up my code and I need to manually insert breakpoints.

Is there a way to break on assertions so that I do not lose my execution context and I'm still able to inspect variables?

  • If this is just for debugging purposes, add a breakpoint on your assert with the condition ChildCount = 2 – Lieven Keersmaekers Oct 12 '17 at 11:20
  • @LievenKeersmaekers, I've got 100's of these assertions in my code. Don't really want to create manual breakpoints for all of them. – Johan Oct 12 '17 at 12:22
  • I understand but it beats adding the extra if-then ;) – Lieven Keersmaekers Oct 12 '17 at 13:18
  • Without adding something like Andrei posted, you can always go to the CPU window, walk up the stack, get the pointers to your local variables and use these if need be. – Lieven Keersmaekers Oct 12 '17 at 13:20

You can add something like following unit into uses clause to stop in debugger (like if you have set breakpoint at every assertion) but continue execution after. Then you can check all conditions leading to assertion.

unit HookAssert;

interface

{$If Defined(DEBUG) }
uses
  Winapi.Windows;

procedure Assert(Condition: Boolean; const Message: String = '');
{$EndIf}

implementation

{$If Defined(DEBUG) }
procedure Assert(Condition: Boolean; const Message: String = '');
begin
  if not Condition then
    DebugBreak;
end;
{$EndIf}

end.

Under Delphi 10 Seattle, I could not reproduce your issue (Not with a basic use case anyway). I could either:

  • Call stack panel : Double click on the line corresponding to the routine where the assertion was raised
  • Local Variable Panel : Choose the routine where the assertion was raised from the dropdown at the top of the panel.

And then I could inspect the variables of my routine.

  • In Tokyo this appears automatic but in my test a string value turned into garbage. – FredS Oct 12 '17 at 16:00

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