Consider the following string

long_string = '#' * 4 + 'a' * 10 + '#' * 4

print(long_string)

####aaaaaaaaaa####

I want to cycle through and get only the first several characters until the character is Not a '#'

I can iterate through and get at just the '#'

''.join(x for x in long_string if x.startswith('#'))

'########'

This is too many.

I want to do something like this

def gen_break(long_string, mychar):
    i = iter(long_string)
    s = next(i)
    while s == mychar:
        yield s
        s = next(i)

''.join(gen_break(long_string, '#'))

'####'

This stopped iterating when it encountered a condition for which to break. Is there a way to do this more elegantly within the (this for this in that) syntax?


NOTE:
This was a contrived example in order to highlight the question I am asking. I'm not looking for a way to parse this example string. I'm looking for a way to break out of iteration in an elegant way, preferably using comprehension syntax.

  • 6
    You can't break in a genexp. You can use itertools.takewhile, though. – user2357112 Oct 12 '17 at 21:12
  • 3
    itertools.takewhile does exactly this – Wondercricket Oct 12 '17 at 21:12
  • Could you deliberately set up your situation/generator so that it causes an error precisely at the point you want to break out? – toonarmycaptain Oct 13 '17 at 12:51
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use the itertools.takewhile function:

from itertools import takewhile

''.join(takewhile(lambda x:x == '#','#### foo bar ### qux'))

this then generates:

>>> ''.join(takewhile(lambda x:x == '#','#### foo bar ### qux'))
'####'

So as long as the predicate (the first argument) of takewhile is satisfied, it iterates through the iterable (the second argument). From the moment the predicate is not satisfied, takewhile will stop. It will not exhaust the remaining(s) of the iterable/iterator.

As far as I know you can not do this with list comprehension/generator/... syntax.

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