I need writing a function that will copy a multidimensional array in C using pointers. I'm using gcc 5.4.0 and clang 3.9.1 on Gentoo. I'm using a fact that using name of array is the same of referencing to address to it first element, so if we have twodimensional array then array_2d = &array_2d[0] and *array_2d = *(&array_2d[0]) = array_2d[0]. This is my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#define ROWS 2
#define COLS 3

void copy_ptr(double *src, double *dest, int len);
void copy_ptr2d(double **src, double **dest, int rows, int cols);

int main() {
    double array[ROWS][COLS] = { { 12.3, 55.1 }, { 33.6, 21.9, 90.8 } };
    double array2[ROWS][COLS];
    printf("Array { { 12.3, 55.1 }, { 33.6, 21.9, 90.8 } }\n");
    printf("Array copy:\n");
    copy_ptr2d(array, array2, ROWS, COLS);
    for (int i = 0; i < ROWS; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < COLS; j++) {
            printf("array2[%d][%d]: %lf\n", i, j, array2[i][j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
    return 0;
}

void copy_ptr2d(double **src, double **dest, int rows, int cols) {
    for (int i = 0; i < rows; i++) {
        copy_ptr(*src, *dest, cols);
        src++;
        dest++;
    }
}

void copy_ptr(double *src, double *dest, int len) {
    for (int i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        *dest = *src;
        dest++;
        src++;
    }
}

The results of compilation code under gcc 5.4.0:

pecan@tux ~ $ gcc main.c 
main.c: In function ‘main’:
main.c:13:16: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘copy_ptr2d’ from incompatible pointer type [-Wincompatible-pointer-types]
     copy_ptr2d(array, array2, ROWS, COLS);
                ^
main.c:6:6: note: expected ‘double **’ but argument is of type ‘double (*)[3]’
 void copy_ptr2d(double **src, double **dest, int rows, int cols);
      ^
main.c:13:23: warning: passing argument 2 of ‘copy_ptr2d’ from incompatible pointer type [-Wincompatible-pointer-types]
     copy_ptr2d(array, array2, ROWS, COLS);
                       ^
main.c:6:6: note: expected ‘double **’ but argument is of type ‘double (*)[3]’
 void copy_ptr2d(double **src, double **dest, int rows, int cols);
      ^
pecan@tux ~ $ ./a.out 
Array { { 12.3, 55.1 }, { 33.6, 21.9, 90.8 } }
Array copy:
Segmentation fault

And under clang 3.9.1:

pecan@tux ~ $ clang main.c 
main.c:13:16: warning: incompatible pointer types passing 'double [2][3]' to parameter of type 'double **' [-Wincompatible-pointer-types]
    copy_ptr2d(array, array2, ROWS, COLS);
               ^~~~~
main.c:6:26: note: passing argument to parameter 'src' here
void copy_ptr2d(double **src, double **dest, int rows, int cols);
                         ^
main.c:13:23: warning: incompatible pointer types passing 'double [2][3]' to parameter of type 'double **' [-Wincompatible-pointer-types]
    copy_ptr2d(array, array2, ROWS, COLS);
                      ^~~~~~
main.c:6:40: note: passing argument to parameter 'dest' here
void copy_ptr2d(double **src, double **dest, int rows, int cols);
                                       ^
2 warnings generated.
pecan@tux ~ $ ./a.out 
Array { { 12.3, 55.1 }, { 33.6, 21.9, 90.8 } }
Array copy:
Segmentation fault

I don't know why I have leak of memory and what I'm doing wrong that I'm getting "Segmentation fault". Can anyone help me?

  • 1
    I like this solution printf("Array { { 12.3, 55.1 }, { 33.6, 21.9, 90.8 } }\n"); However what about ROWS equal to for example 10?:) – Vlad from Moscow Oct 12 '17 at 21:28
  • 1
    2D-Array is not a pointer to a pointer. – BLUEPIXY Oct 12 '17 at 21:30
  • 2
    Those warnings are telling you something. double[][] is not the same as double **. – Christian Gibbons Oct 12 '17 at 21:31
  • I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because OP just need to learn the basic stuff - at least to understand the difference between double, integer, pointer and array. Similar question are asked here all the time. Zero effort question (ie OP did not do anything to find the answer) – P__J__ Oct 12 '17 at 21:39
  • fix like this – BLUEPIXY Oct 12 '17 at 21:39
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try something like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#define ROWS 2
#define COLS 3

void copy_ptr(double src[], double dest[], int len);
void copy_ptr2d(double src[ROWS][COLS], double dest[ROWS][COLS], int rows, int cols);

int main() {
    double array[ROWS][COLS] = { { 12.3, 55.1 }, { 33.6, 21.9, 90.8 } };
    double array2[ROWS][COLS];
    printf("Array { { 12.3, 55.1 }, { 33.6, 21.9, 90.8 } }\n");
    printf("Array copy:\n");
    copy_ptr2d(array, array2, ROWS, COLS);
    for (int i = 0; i < ROWS; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < COLS; j++) {
            printf("array2[%d][%d]: %lf\n", i, j, array2[i][j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
    return 0;
}

void copy_ptr2d(double src[ROWS][COLS], double dest[ROWS][COLS], int rows, int cols)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < rows; i++) {
        copy_ptr(*src, *dest, cols);
        src++;
        dest++;
    }
}

void copy_ptr(double src[], double dest[], int len)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        *dest = *src;
        dest++;
        src++;
    }
}

Do you understand how that works?

  • Just want you to use your brain here :) – Corey Lakey Oct 12 '17 at 21:36
  • Well, to be fair, I read C fluently, and I am not totally tracking (though I will be after enough times reading it) - that tends to be the case w/ code-only answers. Some technical explanation of why this works would add value to the answer. – CodeMouse92 Oct 12 '17 at 22:20
  • My code shows how to implement the functions using 2D-Arrays. Before my code, the functions accepted arguments of double **, and now they accept double src[][] with defined sizes, just like the arguments that the coder who asked this question was using. If that isn't enough hint to what to do next without literally saying it I don't know what is. I could just give it away, but I never learned anything that way. I'd rather be a teacher in this case, since this problem is very specific to C. Very specific to C. – Corey Lakey Oct 12 '17 at 22:29
  • No, that's understandable. (I train interns for a living, so I totally understand where you're coming from.) However, you also have to remember that (a) you're writing the answer for more people than just the OP, and (b) different people have different experience levels, so what's obvious for you may not be obvious to them. I've found it's usually more helpful to provide the explanation and omit the code, rather than to provide the code and omit the explanation. That way, they have to use their brains in using your explanation to write the code themselves. OP could just c/p this as it is. – CodeMouse92 Oct 13 '17 at 0:19
  • TL;DR - "I hear, and I forget. I see, and I remember. I do, and I understand." If they have to write it, they'll learn more. – CodeMouse92 Oct 13 '17 at 0:22

As you correctly mentioned an array designator used in expressions with rare exceptions is converted to pointer to its first element.

So if you have an array declared like

#define ROWS 2
#define COLS 3

//...

double array[ROWS][COLS];

then passed to a function as an argument as for example

f( array );

it is converted to pointer to its first element.

And what type does the element of the array have?

It has the type double[COLS]. That is elements of a two-dimensional array are one-dimensional arrays.

So a pointer to an array of the type double[COLS] will have type double ( * )[COLS].

So the corresponding function parameter shall have the same type.

You can declare the function parameter as Variable Length Array (VLA) or as an array with known fixed size.

Here is a demonstrative program that uses two approaches.

This function declaration

    void copy_ptr2d( size_t, size_t, double [][*], double [][*] );

uses (pointers to) variable length arrays as parameters,

This function declaration

    void copy_ptr2d2( double [][COLS], double [][COLS], size_t );

uses (pointers to) arrays with known size COLS at compile time as parameters.

If your compiler does not support VLAs then just remove the code that uses the function with VLAs.

    #include <stdio.h>

    #define ROWS 2
    #define COLS 3

    void copy_ptr2d( size_t, size_t, double [][*], double [][*] );

    void copy_ptr2d2( double [][COLS], double [][COLS], size_t );

    void copy_ptr( double *, double *, size_t );

    int main( void ) 
    {
        double array[ROWS][COLS] = 
        { 
            { 12.3, 55.1 }, 
            { 33.6, 21.9, 90.8 } 
        };

        double array2[ROWS][COLS];

        puts( "array\n=====" );

        for ( size_t i = 0; i < ROWS; i++ )
        {
            for ( size_t j = 0; j < COLS; j++ ) printf( "%4.1f ", array[i][j] );
            putchar( '\n' );
        }

        putchar( '\n' );

        puts( "Array copying...\n" );

        copy_ptr2d( ROWS, COLS, array, array2 );

        puts( "array2\n======" );

        for ( size_t i = 0; i < ROWS; i++ )
        {
            for ( size_t j = 0; j < COLS; j++ ) printf( "%4.1f ", array2[i][j] );
            putchar( '\n' );
        }

        putchar( '\n' );

        puts( "Array copying...\n" );

        copy_ptr2d2( array, array2, ROWS );

        puts( "array2\n======" );

        for ( size_t i = 0; i < ROWS; i++ )
        {
            for ( size_t j = 0; j < COLS; j++ ) printf( "%4.1f ", array2[i][j] );
            putchar( '\n' );
        }

        putchar( '\n' );

        return 0;
    }

    void copy_ptr2d( size_t rows, size_t cols, double src[][cols], double dest[][cols] )
    {
        for ( size_t i = 0; i < rows; i++ )
        {
            copy_ptr( src[i], dest[i], cols );
        }
    }    

    void copy_ptr2d2( double src[][COLS], double dest[][COLS], size_t rows )
    {
        for ( size_t i = 0; i < rows; i++ )
        {
            copy_ptr( src[i], dest[i], COLS );
        }
    }    

    void copy_ptr( double *src, double *dest, size_t len ) 
    {
        while ( len-- ) *dest++ = *src++;
    }

The program output looks like

array
=====
12.3 55.1  0.0 
33.6 21.9 90.8 

Array copying...

array2
======
12.3 55.1  0.0 
33.6 21.9 90.8 

Array copying...

array2
======
12.3 55.1  0.0 
33.6 21.9 90.8 

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