I have this query

SELECT (T1.FirstDayOfMonth
      , T1.VehicleType
      , SUM(T1.Cost-T2.Cost)
      )
FROM (SELECT FirstDayOfMonth
           , VehicleType
           , [Cost] = Cost*Rate
      FROM fnCalculationData(@CalculationId1)
      GROUP BY FirstDayOfMonth, VehicleType
      ) AS T1
    LEFT JOIN (SELECT FirstDayOfMonth
                    , VehicleType
                    , [Cost] = Cost*Rate
               FROM fnCalculationData(@CalculationId2)
               GROUP BY FirstDayOfMonth, VehicleType
               ) AS T2 ON T1.VehicleType = T2.VehicleType
GROUP BY T1.FirstDayOfMonth, T1.VehicleType

But I realize I might need to filter my results on another field, RegistrationTypeId later on, so I add it to my selects:

SELECT (T1.FirstDayOfMonth
      , T1.VehicleType
      , T1.RegistrationTypeId
      , SUM(T1.Cost - T2.Cost)
        )
FROM (SELECT FirstDayOfMonth
           , VehicleType
           , RegistrationTypeId
           , [Cost] = Cost*Rate
      FROM fnCalculationData(@CalculationId1)
      GROUP BY FirstDayOfMonth, VehicleType, RegistrationTypeId
      ) AS T1 LEFT JOIN (SELECT FirstDayOfMonth
                              , VehicleType
                              , RegistrationTypeId
                              , [Cost] = Cost*Rate
                         FROM fnCalculationData(@CalculationId2)
                         GROUP BY FirstDayOfMonth, VehicleType, RegistrationTypeId
                         ) AS T2 ON T1.VehicleType = T2.VehicleType
GROUP BY T1.FirstDayOfMonth, T1.VehicleType, T1.RegistrationTypeId 

But then this gives me the wrong cost value, (even If I dont include RegistrationTypeId in my main SELECTs GROUP BY) it changes row counts of my subselects and the result is wrong.

How can I get return this field without affecting the cost calculation?

  • 5
    Sample data please, with what you get and with what you expect. – wast Oct 13 '17 at 9:11
  • Which SQL Server version are you using? Seems like you need aggregated and detailed information at the same time and window functions can do the work here. Subselects too, of course. – Rigerta Demiri Oct 13 '17 at 9:11
  • Why all the parentheses? – JohnHC Oct 13 '17 at 9:15
  • TSQL? So many brackets... :) – TaPaKaH UA Oct 13 '17 at 9:21
  • The difficulty is that if each Vehicle Type can have multiple Registration Types then when you group by both it re-expands the Vehicle Type Grouping to a number of repeats of the vehicle type (one for each registration type). This would always do this so it depends on what is more important, having the Registration Type in it or maintaining the original cost value and row count... – russ Oct 13 '17 at 10:18
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think you need to include all the GROUP BY keys as JOIN keys:

select T1.FirstDayOfMonth, T1.VehicleType, T1.RegistrationTypeId, 
      (T1.Cost - coalesce(T2.Cost, 0)))
from (Select FirstDayOfMonth, VehicleType, RegistrationTypeId, [Cost] = 
Cost*Rate 
      from fnCalculationData(@CalculationId1) 
      group by FirstDayOfMonth, VehicleType, RegistrationTypeId
     ) t1 left join
     (Select FirstDayOfMonth, VehicleType, RegistrationTypeId, [Cost] = 
Cost*Rate 
      from fnCalculationData(@CalculationId2) 
      group by FirstDayOfMonth, VehicleType, RegistrationTypeId
     ) t2
     on t1.FirstDayOfMonth = t2.FirstDayOfMonth and
        t1.VehicleType = t2.VehicleType and
        t1.RegistrationTypeId = t2.RegistrationTypeId;

You should not need the aggregation in the outer query. You do need coalesce() in case there is no match in the second table.

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