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I have a question about constexpr defining a static data member of literal type that is declared const (and not specified inline or constexpr) in the class definition:

// S.h

struct S
{
  static int const i; // not specified inline or constexpr
};

// S.cpp

#include "S.h"
constexpr int const S::i = 42; // definition, not declaration

// main.cpp

#include "S.h"
int main()
{
  return S::i;
}

Clang/gcc return 42 in C++11/14 mode, but report an error (undefined reference to S::i) in C++17 mode. If I comment out constexpr both return 42 in C++17 mode, too.

S::i has external linkage because S has external linkage. S::i is not declared constexpr and so (if I'm not mistaken) C++17 10.1.5 p1 does not apply:

A function or static data member declared with the constexpr specifier is implicitly an inline function or variable

I understand this sentence as if it means (bold my understanding): A static data member declared with the constexpr specifier in the class definition is implicitly an inline variable

S::i is thus not an inline variable. Yet the definition of S::i seems to have internal linkage in C++17 mode as if constexpr means inline. Is this correct? If so where is the proof in the standard?

Or do I misunderstand 10.1.5 p1 and it really means (bold my misunderstanding): A static data member declared with the constexpr specifier in the class definition and the definition in namespace scope is implicitly an inline variable?

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Yet the definition of S::i seems to have internal linkage in C++17 mode as if constexpr means inline. Is this correct? If so where is the proof in the standard?

Yes, it is correct. cppreference :

The inline specifier, when used in a decl-specifier-seq of a variable with static storage duration (static class member or namespace-scope variable), declares the variable to be an inline variable.

A static member variable (but not a namespace-scope variable) declared constexpr is implicitly an inline variable. (since C++17)

  • The last (bold) sentence reflects 10.1.5 p1 s2. And as far as I understand the wording "declared constexpr" the static data member must be declared constexpr in the class definition which is not the case here. That's why I wrote that I think that sentence does not apply here. In other words: does the constexpr definition in S.cpp mean that S::i is declared constexpr although it is not declared constexpr in the class definition? – x y Oct 13 '17 at 10:44
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[dcl.inline]/6 states:

If a function or variable with external linkage is declared inline in one translation unit, it shall be declared inline in all translation units in which it appears; no diagnostic is required.

So as you pointed out, if we can show that constexpr implicitly implies inline, it would explain the undefined reference error of your example.

[dcl.constexpr]/1 states [emphasis mine]:

The constexpr specifier shall be applied only to the definition of a variable or variable template or the declaration of a function or function template.

As well as:

A function or static data member declared with the constexpr specifier is implicitly an inline function or variable ([dcl.inline]).

[basic.def]/1 states [emphasis mine]:

A declaration may introduce one or more names into a translation unit or redeclare names introduced by previous declarations.

as well as (/2):

A declaration is a definition unless:

[... none applies for constexpr int const S::i = 42;]

The essence here being that definitions are declarations (that fully define the entity introduced by the declaration), so constexpr int const S::i = 42; is also (in addition to being a definition) a (re-)declaration, in which case [dcl.constexpr]/1 applies, and S::i is inline in the translation unit of S.cpp, ergo, by [dcl.inline]/6, in all other translations units in which it appears. Conversely, by [dcl.constexpr]/1, the constexpr specifier, e.g. specifically in this context of static data members, can only appear in declarations that are definitions.

Somewhat relevant in the context of the latter is that a constexpr static data member declaration with initialization is, also, as of C++17, a definition, allowing for the specification that constexpr shall only be applied to the variable definition (i.e., never to a non-initializing declaration). See [depr.static_constexpr]/1.

  • Thanks for your explanation. It means I could answer my own question: yes, I misunderstand 10.1.5 p1 s2. But two things bother me. First, the standards committee introduces a new language feature (inline variables) that breaks existing code that is at most 6 years old. And second, it is inconsistent with variables declared extern. Suppose in S.h there is instead "extern int const i;", in S.cpp there is instead "constexpr int const i = 42;" and in main() there is instead "return i;". This is OK, there is no undefined reference to i. The same applies to variable templates declared extern. Weird. – x y Oct 15 '17 at 8:07
  • @xy I agree that breaking changes are always delicate. As for the your second comment, I don't see any inconsistency/weirdness there. extern in that context is just storage class specifier not applicable to class members (see [[dcl.stc]/5](timsong-cpp.github.io/cppwp/dcl.stc). By [[basic.link]/3](timsong-cpp.github.io/cppwp/basic.link) i in S.h has external linkage, and for this non-class member variable, the constexpr does not (implicitly) imply inline, thus there is no inconsistency and the external linkage of i, as expected, allows it to be used in main(). – dfri Oct 16 '17 at 9:04
  • But you mention exactly the inconsistency I mean: "the constexpr does not (implicitly) imply inline". Why does the constexpr specifier imply inline in the definition of a const static data member in namespace scope when the constexpr specifier does not imply inline in the definition of a const variable declared extern in namespace scope? S::i is actually only a class scope bound ordinary namespace scope "extern int const i". Apart from that I don't see any difference between those two. That's why I think constexpr should not imply inline for S::i. – x y Oct 16 '17 at 10:45
  • @xy I answered your comment interpreting "inconsistency" as in the "ambiguous" sense (no ambiguity here), whereas I realize you refer to inconsistencies in intent between the well-defined rules for separated (although similar) entities. As for the latter, I do see your point, but I can't answer as to why the standard chose this approach (only that the examples above are, indeed, acting as well-defined and according to the standard). For such a question, you're probably better of asking it in a mail group/slack (cpplang) that is closer to those actually working with & writing the standard. – dfri Oct 16 '17 at 11:12
  • @xy N4424 and its update/addendum P0386R0 should give you the reasons as to why. The latter also introduces the inline implied by constexpr rule (in the context discussed in this Q&A), and one can speculate it has been added to avoid constructs such as static inline constexpr const ... = ... (as used in the former). Finally, N4147 should also be of interest. – dfri Oct 16 '17 at 11:40

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