21

I have implemented the following component. It works and behaves as expected. Nevertheless, as the implementation of ControlValueAccessor was new to me, I had to follow a blog without understanding the deeper details of a few sections. So this is a type of "it works but why?!" situation.

@Component({ selector: ..., templateUrl: ..., styleUrls: ...,
  providers: [{ provide: NG_VALUE_ACCESSOR, 
                useExisting: forwardRef(() => InputTextComponent), 
                multi: true }]
})
export class InputComponent implements ControlValueAccessor {

  constructor() { }
  @Input() info: string;
  onChange: any = () => { }
  onTouch: any = () => { }

  writeValue(input: any): void {
    this.info.value = input;
    // this.onChange(input);
    // this.onTouch();
  }

  registerOnChange(_: any): void { this.onChange = _; }
  registerOnTouched(_: any): void { this.onTouch = _; }

  setDisabledState?(state: boolean): void { }

  onEdit(value: string): void { this.onChange(value); }
}

When I've got it working, I commented out the second and third line of writeValue(...) method and, as far I can tell, nothing broke. Those calls are consistently suggested by other blogs as well, so I'm convinced that it's improper to omit them. However, I don't believe in magic and prefer to have a concrete reason for doing things.

Why is it important to execute the call to onChange(...) and onTouch(...) in writeValue(...)? What will go wrong and under what circumstances can it be expected?

As a side quest, I also tried to comment out the other methods and discovered that I couldn't tell anything going bananas when I removed setDisabledState(...). When can that one be expected to cause problems? Does it really need to be implemented (I've seen version with question mark both before and after the parentheses with parameters like so: setDisabledState?(state: boolean): void { } but also like this: setDisabledState(state: boolean)?: void { }).

9
  • How are you using this component?
    – yurzui
    Commented Oct 14, 2017 at 9:58
  • Did you read angular.io/api/forms/ControlValueAccessor?
    – jonrsharpe
    Commented Oct 14, 2017 at 10:10
  • Why is it important to execute the call to onChange(...) and onTouch(...) in writeValue(...)? Where did you see it?
    – yurzui
    Commented Oct 14, 2017 at 10:48
  • @yurzui, here is probably referring to these Commented Oct 14, 2017 at 10:52
  • @AngularInDepth.com I think he is referring to this take.ms/IGcPJ
    – yurzui
    Commented Oct 14, 2017 at 10:53

2 Answers 2

24

Read this article that explains the ControlValueAccessor in great details:

You usually need to implement ControlValueAcceessor interface on a component if it's supposed to be used as part of an Angular form.

I commented out the second and third line of writeValue(...) method and, as far I can tell, nothing broke.

This is probably because you're not applying any form directive - formControl or ngModel that links a FormControl to your custom input component. The FormControl uses writeValue method of the InputComponent for communication.

Here is the picture from the article I referenced above:

enter image description here

The writeValue method is used by formControl to set value to the native form control. The registerOnChange method is used by formControl to register a callback that is expected to be triggered every time the native form control is updated. The registerOnTouched method is used to indicate that a user interacted with a control.

Why is it important to execute the call to onChange(...) and onTouch(...) in writeValue(...)? What will go wrong and under what circumstances can it be expected?

This is the mechanism by which you custom control that implements ControlValueAcceessor notifies the Angular's FormControl that a value in the input has changed or the user interacted with the control.

...discovered that I couldn't tell anything going bananas when I removed setDisabledState(...)...Does it really need to be implemented?

As specified in the interface this function is called by the forms API when the control status changes to or from "DISABLED". Depending on the value, it should enable or disable the appropriate DOM element. You need to implement it if you want to be notified whenever the status of an associated FormControl becomes disabled and then you can perform some custom logic (for example, disable your input component).

13
  • Great answer. Two follow-ups, though. #1 If I have registered onChange() but don't invoke it from writeValue() (only setting the value to the backing field but not propagating it to onChange()) I still get the value to the form group in the parent component. So what's not working now? I can't see it. Do you have a clear example on what's not working out there? #2 I've seen setDisableState() without question mark, with question mark after the method name and with question mark after the parentheses. Is that the same meaning? What's that all about? Commented Oct 14, 2017 at 19:57
  • @DonkeyBanana, please read the article I referenced and if you still questions after that create a stackblitz demo and let me know what's unclear from the article Commented Oct 18, 2017 at 8:33
  • 7
    You have to call onChange if the user interacts with your DOM control and changed its value, so that the value is written to the form-value. Calling it in writeValue is wrong. The form will call this function, if the programm changes the value of the form-control. You only have to update your DOM control to reflect the current form-value.
    – Lars
    Commented Mar 30, 2018 at 14:25
  • 1
    I missed a clear statement, that calling onChange inside writeValue is wrong, because onChange has to be used to inform the FormControl about a change of the value and writeValue is used to update the UI. Combining these function is kind of a circular dependency. Everything is ok with your answer. I learned about the ControlValueAccessor just a few days ago and stumbled upon the implementation DonkeyBanana quoted. So I felt the need to comment it.
    – Lars
    Commented Apr 2, 2018 at 16:26
  • 1
    You have saved me from excruciating pain that I was suffering from for last 3 days. Article provides in depth explanation. Thanks!!
    – Manish
    Commented Mar 10, 2020 at 19:48
15

I don't think the accepted answer answers the most central question in a succinct way:

Why is it important to execute the call to onChange(...) and onTouch(...) in writeValue(...)?

It isn't. You do not need to call onChange in writeValue. It is not the intended usage (see documentation link below).

What will go wrong and under what circumstances can it be expected?

Expect nothing to go wrong. Elaborate answer:

If you were to call onChange from inside writeValue you'll notice:

  • First onChange call does nothing. That's because onChange callback hasn't been registered (ie registerOnChange not called) when writeValue is first called.
  • Later calls to onChange from inside writeValue updates your model (with emitModelToViewChange = false to avoid recursively calling writeValue) with the value you gave it - which you just received - from your model.

In other words, unless you rely on your component to somehow immediately change the value it receives in writeValue, and for it to pass those changes back to your model but only on second and later invocations of writeValue, you're safe to not call onChange from writeValue.

See example in documentation here: https://angular.io/api/forms/ControlValueAccessor

3
  • Interesting fact — none of the example links provided by the OP actually has this.onChange() inside writeValue() now.
    – enkryptor
    Commented May 24, 2021 at 11:42
  • interesting indeed - could it really be the internet course-corrected?
    – corolla
    Commented May 26, 2021 at 17:48
  • 1
    @corolla I want to transform the value I pass to my formControl according to different criteria. So I need to call the onChange() method in WriteValue(). How can I do it then since registerOnChange() is triggered after writeValue() ?
    – PepeW
    Commented Aug 10, 2021 at 22:46

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