7

When ranging over an array, two values are returned for each iteration. The first is the index, and the second is a copy of the element at that index.

Here's my code:

var myArray = [5]int {1,2,3,4,5}
sum := 0
// first with copy
for _, value := range myArray {
    sum += value
}
// second without copy
for i := range myArray {
    sum += myArray[i]
}

Which one should i use for better performance?

Is there any difference for built-in types in these two pieces of code?

1
  • The answer to "which is better for performance" is always: Run a benchmark and see. Results often vary between applications, runtime versions, and in some cases the OS or hardware you're using. Commented Oct 14, 2017 at 14:14

5 Answers 5

8

We can test this using Go's benchmarking tool (read more at https://dave.cheney.net/2013/06/30/how-to-write-benchmarks-in-go).

sum_test.go

package sum

import "testing"

func BenchmarkSumIterator(b *testing.B) {
    var ints = [5]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5}

    sum := 0
    for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
        for j := range ints {
            sum += ints[j]
        }
    }
}

func BenchmarkSumRange(b *testing.B) {
    var ints = [5]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5}

    sum := 0
    for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
        for _, value := range ints {
            sum += value
        }
    }

}

Run it with:

$ go test -bench=. sum_test.go 
goos: linux
goarch: amd64
BenchmarkSumIterator-4      412796047            2.97 ns/op
BenchmarkSumRange-4         413581974            2.89 ns/op
PASS
ok      command-line-arguments  3.010s

Range appears be to slightly more efficient. Running this benchmark a few more times also confirms this. It's worth noting that this may only be true for this specific case where you have a small fixed size array. You should try to make decisions like these based on what you'd encounter in production and also try to reconcile that with code readability.

7

the second one is faster but the difference is too low which you can ignore

the main difference is when you have a big size loop. in that case first loop takes more memory than the second one

1
  • It is not so obvious. The second case checks the array boundaries each time. It takes some time too. The first case do it only once. Commented Jan 27, 2021 at 7:43
2

I made some similar tests and came to the conclusion that the for range loop is slightly faster than for i for slices, but there are no difference for arrays.
There are my tests:

package go_test

import "testing"

var intsSlice = []int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100}
var intsArray = [...]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100}

func BenchmarkForRangeI_Slice(b *testing.B) {
    sum := 0
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        for i := range intsSlice {
            sum += intsSlice[i]
        }
    }
}

func BenchmarkForRangeV_Slice(b *testing.B) {
    sum := 0
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        for _, v := range intsSlice {
            sum += v
        }
    }
}

func BenchmarkForI_Slice(b *testing.B) {
    sum := 0
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        for i := 0; i < len(intsSlice); i++ {
            sum += intsSlice[i]
        }
    }
}

func BenchmarkForRangeI_Array(b *testing.B) {
    sum := 0
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        for i := range intsArray {
            sum += intsArray[i]
        }
    }
}

func BenchmarkForRangeV_Array(b *testing.B) {
    sum := 0
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        for _, v := range intsArray {
            sum += v
        }
    }
}

func BenchmarkForI_Array(b *testing.B) {
    sum := 0
    for n := 0; n < b.N; n++ {
        for i := 0; i < len(intsArray); i++ {
            sum += intsArray[i]
        }
    }
}


And the results:

go test -bench=. for_test.go -benchtime 100000000x
goos: windows
goarch: amd64
cpu: 11th Gen Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-11400H @ 2.70GHz
BenchmarkForRangeI_Slice-12     100000000               33.87 ns/op
BenchmarkForRangeV_Slice-12     100000000               33.91 ns/op
BenchmarkForI_Slice-12          100000000               40.68 ns/op
BenchmarkForRangeI_Array-12     100000000               28.47 ns/op
BenchmarkForRangeV_Array-12     100000000               28.57 ns/op
BenchmarkForI_Array-12          100000000               28.40 ns/op
PASS
ok      command-line-arguments  19.439s

If we will dive into the disassembler, we will see that in for i loop go tries to get address of slice and it's size every cycle, but in for range loop it does it only once before the loop:

For range:

sum := 0
for i := range intsSlice {
    sum += intsSlice[i]
}
main.go:9       0x48dd34        488b0de5070b00      MOVQ main.intsSlice(SB), CX     # store slice data pointer in CX (from static address)
main.go:9       0x48dd3b        488b15e6070b00      MOVQ main.intsSlice+8(SB), DX   # store slice data size in DX (from static address) 
main.go:9       0x48dd42        31c0            XORL AX, AX             
main.go:9       0x48dd44        31db            XORL BX, BX             
main.go:9       0x48dd46        eb0e            JMP 0x48dd56    
######################## loop start ##########################              
main.go:9       0x48dd48        488d7001        LEAQ 0x1(AX), SI            
main.go:10      0x48dd4c        488b3cc1        MOVQ 0(CX)(AX*8), DI            
main.go:10      0x48dd50        4801fb          ADDQ DI, BX             
main.go:9       0x48dd53        4889f0          MOVQ SI, AX             
main.go:9       0x48dd56        4839d0          CMPQ DX, AX             
main.go:9       0x48dd59        7ced            JL 0x48dd48     # jump back if AX (index counter) is less than DX (slice size) 
######################## loop end ##########################

For i:

sum := 0
for i := 0; i < len(intsSlice); i++ {
    sum += intsSlice[i]
}
main.go:7       0x48dd34        31c0            XORL AX, AX             
main.go:7       0x48dd36        31c9            XORL CX, CX             
main.go:9       0x48dd38        eb0e            JMP 0x48dd48    
######################## loop start ##########################          
main.go:9       0x48dd3a        488d5801        LEAQ 0x1(AX), BX            
main.go:10      0x48dd3e        488b14c2        MOVQ 0(DX)(AX*8), DX            
main.go:10      0x48dd42        4801d1          ADDQ DX, CX             
main.go:9       0x48dd45        4889d8          MOVQ BX, AX             
main.go:9       0x48dd48        488b15d1070b00      MOVQ main.intsSlice(SB), DX     # store slice data pointer in DX (from static address)
main.go:9       0x48dd4f        483905d2070b00      CMPQ AX, main.intsSlice+8(SB)  # compare to slice data size (static address)    
main.go:9       0x48dd56        7fe2            JG 0x48dd3a                                 # jump back if slice size is greater than AX (index counter)
######################## loop end ##########################
1
1

These are my results:

$ go version
go version go1.20.4 linux/amd64

The benchmarks code:

package tests

import "testing"

func BenchmarkSumIterator(b *testing.B) {
    ints := [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}
    sum := 0

    for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
        for j := range ints {
            sum += ints[j]
        }
    }
}

func BenchmarkSumRange(b *testing.B) {
    ints := [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}
    sum := 0

    for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
        for _, v := range ints {
            sum += v
        }
    }
}

func BenchmarkSumIteratorStruct(b *testing.B) {
    sum := 0
    strs := [10]struct {
        a int
        b [10]int
    }{
        {a: 1, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
        {a: 2, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
        {a: 3, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
        {a: 4, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
        {a: 5, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
        {a: 6, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
        {a: 7, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
        {a: 8, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
        {a: 9, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
        {a: 10, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
    }
    for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
        for j := range strs {
            sum += strs[j].a
        }
    }
}

func BenchmarkSumRangeStruct(b *testing.B) {
    sum := 0
    strs := [10]struct {
        a int
        b [10]int
    }{
        {a: 1, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
        {a: 2, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
        {a: 3, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
        {a: 4, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
        {a: 5, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
        {a: 6, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
        {a: 7, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
        {a: 8, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
        {a: 9, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
        {a: 10, b: [10]int{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}},
    }
    for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
        for _, v := range strs {
            sum += v.a
        }
    }
}

$ go test --bench=. tests/*
goos: linux
goarch: amd64
cpu: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-8550U CPU @ 1.80GHz
BenchmarkSumIterator-8          283174166            4.245 ns/op
BenchmarkSumRange-8             178915618            6.553 ns/op
BenchmarkSumIteratorStruct-8    291987922            4.026 ns/op
BenchmarkSumRangeStruct-8       62024917            18.03 ns/op
PASS
ok      command-line-arguments  6.221s

Copying values is relatively easier when iterating over an array of integers. However, when iterating over a struct, the process becomes more complex as we need to copy the entire struct.

0

Your example is not good.

If the array elements are numbers, there is no difference. Although second one does copy by reference, but the variable i is assigned a new value every time, it also take time.

If the array elements are struct instance, then second one is significantly faster than first one.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.